Lucky (magazine)

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Lucky
Lucky magazine November 2008.png
Editor Eva Chen
Categories Fashion
Frequency Weekly
Publisher Condé Nast
Total circulation
(December 2012)
1,109,835[1]
First issue 2000
Company Advance Publications
Country United States
Language English
Website www.luckymag.com
ISSN 1531-4294

Lucky is a monthly shopping and style magazine.[2]

Operations and history[edit]

Since its launch in December 2000, Lucky has been one of Condé Nast's biggest successes, with circulation going from 500,000 to over 1.1 million.[3]

Reception from magazine industry[edit]

When Lucky was first released, it received criticism for its content that bordered between editorial and advertising. Lucky epitomized a trend for magazines to seem more like catalogs. Additionally, the magazine received negative response to its short and product-centric editorial content. The American Society of Magazine Editors has also been skeptical of Lucky's business practices in featuring products. "Susan Ungaro, editor in chief of Family Circle and a member of the board of directors of the American Society of Magazine Editors, worries that these ‘magalogs' will erode reader trust-Lucky is all picks, no pans-and she fears that inevitably magazines will try to share in the profits from the sale of goods in their pages."[4]

Lucky's reputation has grown to a more positive one as time progressed. Simon Dumenco, columnist of New York Magazine initially gave a negative assessment, but later praises the magazine for focusing on the merits of a product rather than advertising it through celebrity endorsements like other women"s magazines.[5] David Carr and Jeremy W. Peters in an article published in the New York Times stated, "It was, in retrospect, ahead of its time, a print rendering of a shopping portal on the Web. It was well received by both the news media and advertisers, in part because it was a well executed magazine that did not take itself too seriously…"[6]

Reception from advertising industry[edit]

Lucky was Advertising Age's Magazine of the Year in 2003. Advertising Age highlighted Lucky's success with marketers and consumers.[5][7]

Lucky stickers[edit]

"Yes" and "maybe" stickers, an innovation of Lucky, are included in each issue to allow readers to mark their favorite items.[4] Stickers are meant to enhance the reading experience by pulling readers into an activity that offers instant gratification.[8]

Editor-in-chief[edit]

Kim France was founder and the first editor-in-chief of Lucky. As the recession weakened Lucky, readers reduced their shopping habits, thus diminishing their need for a shopping magazine. The Publishers Information Bureau also reported a dwindling amount of advertising pages in Lucky from April to June in 2009 while other magazines marketed towards women recovered.[6]

Brandon Holley replaced France as editor-in-chief in 2010.

In June 2013, Eva Chen replaced Holley as editor-in-chief.[6]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "eCirc for Consumer Magazines". Alliance for Audited Media. December 31, 2012. Retrieved June 21, 2013. 
  2. ^ Lucky Fact Sheet
  3. ^ Since Lucky's launch in December 2000, circulation has gone from 500,000 to over 1 million, proving to be one of the most successful launches in Condé Nast history. [1]
  4. ^ a b Davis, Alisha, and David Noonan. "Are You Feeling Lucky?" Newsweek 135, no. 24 (June 12, 2000): 62.
  5. ^ a b Fine, Jon. "Magazine of the year: Lucky." Advertising Age 74, no. 42 (October 20, 2003): S1,S4.
  6. ^ a b c Carr, David, and Jeremy W. Peters. "The Editor Of Lucky Magazine Is Replaced." New York Times (September 9, 2010): 8.
  7. ^ "Media Insight: Lucky Magazine." PR News 57, no. 14 (April 2, 2001): 1.
  8. ^ Vyse, Stuart. "Shopping as a Leisure-Time Activity." In Going Broke: Why Americans Can't Hold On To Their Money, 147–149. Oxford University Press, 2008.

External links[edit]