Luis Enrique Martínez García

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Luis Enrique
Luis Enrique 12.jpg
Personal information
Full name Luis Enrique Martínez García
Date of birth (1970-05-08) 8 May 1970 (age 43)
Place of birth Gijón, Spain
Height 1.80 m (5 ft 11 in)
Playing position Midfielder / Striker
Club information
Current club Celta (manager)
Youth career
1981–1988 Sporting Gijón
1984–1988 → La Braña (loan)
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1988–1990 Sporting B
1989–1991 Sporting Gijón 36 (14)
1991–1996 Real Madrid 157 (15)
1996–2004 Barcelona 207 (73)
Total 400 (102)
National team
1990–1991 Spain U21 5 (0)
1991–1992 Spain U23 14 (3)
1991–2002 Spain 62 (12)
Teams managed
2008–2011 Barcelona B
2011–2012 Roma
2013– Celta
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.
† Appearances (Goals).

Luis Enrique Martínez García (born 8 May 1970), known as Luis Enrique, is a Spanish retired footballer, and the current manager of La Liga club Celta de Vigo.

As a player his usual position was right or attacking midfielder, but he was notable for his versatility, having played in all positions throughout his career except central defender and goalkeeper.[1][2][3][4][5][6] Starting in 1991 and ending in 2004 he represented both Real Madrid and Barcelona, with equal individual and team success, appearing in more than 500 official games and scoring more than 100 goals.

Enrique represented his country in three World Cups and one European Championship, and was also noted for his temperament and stamina.

Playing career[edit]

Club career[edit]

Luis Enrique was born in Gijón, Asturias. After starting his career with local Sporting de Gijón, he spent most of it with the two biggest Spanish clubs: first Real Madrid for five seasons and, in a stunning move, he saw out his contract and moved to fierce rivals FC Barcelona on a free transfer. The Catalan club's supporters were at first hesitant about their new acquisition, but he soon won the culés' heart, staying eight years with the club, eventually becoming first-team captain and scoring several times in El Clásico against his former employers.

In his first three seasons with Barcelona Luis Enrique netted 46 La Liga goals, with Barça finishing runner-up in 1996–97, subsequently winning back-to-back domestic championship accolades.

On 10 August 2004, at the age of 34, he announced his retirement, feeling that he could no longer keep up to the standards he set for himself.[7] Luis Enrique finished his professional career with league totals of 400 games and 102 goals, being named by Pelé as one of the top 125 greatest living footballers in March.[8]

International career[edit]

Luis Enrique played for Spain in three FIFA World Cups: 1994, 1998 and 2002 (as well as UEFA Euro 1996), and accumulated 62 caps, scoring 12 goals in his international career. He was also a member of the gold-winning squad at the 1992 Summer Olympics in Barcelona, and made his debut for the main side on 17 April 1991, featuring 22 minutes in a 0–2 friendly loss to Romania in Cáceres.[9]

In the 1994 World Cup, held in the United States, in the 1–2 quarter-final defeat against Italy, Mauro Tassotti's elbow made contact with Luis Enrique's face to bloody effect.[10] The action was of such impact that Luis Enrique reportedly lost a pint of blood as a result, but during the match the incident went unpunished; Tassotti was banned for eight games afterwards, and never played internationally again.[11]

When Spain met Italy at Euro 2008 on 22 June, to battle for a place in the semi-finals, Luis Enrique reportedly called for the team to "take revenge" on Italy for the 1994 World Cup incident.[12] Tassotti, now an assistant coach at A.C. Milan, told Marca newspaper that he was tired of always being reminded of this incident and that he had never intended to hurt Luis Enrique.

International goals[edit]

# Date Venue Opponent Score Result Competition
1. 2 July 1994 RFK Memorial, Washington, United States   Switzerland 2–0 3–0 1994 World Cup
2. 16 November 1994 Sánchez Pizjuán, Seville, Spain  Denmark 3–0 3–0 Euro 1996 qualifying
3. 17 December 1994 Constant Vanden Stock, Brussels, Belgium  Belgium 1–4 1–4 Euro 1996 qualifying
4. 4 September 1996 Svangaskarð, Toftir, Faroe Islands  Faroe Islands 0–1 2–6 1998 World Cup qualification
5. 13 November 1996 Heliodoro Rodríguez López, Tenerife, Spain  Slovakia 3–1 4–1 1998 World Cup qualification
6. 11 October 1997 El Molinón, Gijón, Spain  Faroe Islands 1–0 3–1 1998 World Cup qualification
7. 11 October 1997 El Molinón, Gijón, Spain  Faroe Islands 3–1 3–1 1998 World Cup qualification
8. 24 June 1998 Félix Bollaert, Lens, France  Bulgaria 2–0 6–1 1998 World Cup
9. 5 June 1999 El Madrigal, Villarreal, Spain  San Marino 2–0 9–0 Euro 2000 qualifying
10. 5 June 1999 El Madrigal, Villarreal, Spain  San Marino 6–0 9–0 Euro 2000 qualifying
11. 5 June 1999 El Madrigal, Villarreal, Spain  San Marino 7–0 9–0 Euro 2000 qualifying
12. 4 September 1999 Ernst Happel, Vienna, Austria  Austria 1–3 1–3 Euro 2000 qualifying

Managerial career[edit]

Barcelona B[edit]

On 18 June 2008 Luis Enrique returned to Barcelona, taking over the reins of the B team, renamed Barcelona Atlètic for that season.[13] As he succeeded longtime Barça teammate Pep Guardiola, he stated: "I have come home", and "I finished playing here and now I will start coaching here."; as his predecessor he too eventually had success, helping the club return to division two in his second season, after an absence of 11 years.

In mid-March 2011, Luis Enrique announced his departure from Barcelona B at the end of the season, despite still having two years left on his contract.[14] He led the side to the playoffs, but it was ineligible for promotion.

Roma[edit]

On 8 June 2011, Luis Enrique reached an agreement with Serie A club A.S. Roma to become the Giallorossi's new head coach. He signed a two-year contract, being joined by a staff of four members, including Iván de la Peña, who played two years for crosstown rivals S.S. Lazio, as technical collaborator.[15]

Roma was eliminated from the UEFA Europa League by ŠK Slovan Bratislava, amidst great discussion of the substitution of legendary Francesco Totti by Stefano Okaka Chuka. The capital club also lost their first game in the league against Cagliari Calcio, making it just the third time that it lost the opener in 18 years.[16]

Even though he still had one year in his link running, Luis Enrique decided to leave Roma at the end of the season, after the club failed to qualify for any European competition.[17][18]

Celta[edit]

On 8 June 2013 Luis Enrique became Celta de Vigo's new manager, replacing former national teammate Abel Resino. Shortly after, however, after Tito Vilanova announced he was leaving Barcelona, he was viewed as his possible successor,[19] but nothing came of it.

Honours[edit]

Club[edit]

Real Madrid
Barcelona

International[edit]

Statistics[edit]

Club[edit]

Club Season League Cup Europe Other[20] Total
Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
Sporting Gijón 1989–90 1 0 - - - - - - 1 0
1990–91 35 14 9 3 - - - - 44 17
Total 36 14 9 3 0 0 0 0 45 17
Real Madrid 1991–92 29 4 6 1 6 0 - - 41 5
1992–93 34 2 6 0 8 1 - - 48 3
1993–94 28 2 4 1 6 0 2 0 40 3
1994–95 35 4 2 0 6 0 - - 43 4
1995–96 31 3 0 0 8 0 2 0 41 3
Total 157 15 18 2 34 1 4 0 213 18
Barcelona 1996–97 35 17 7 1 7 0 2 0 51 18
1997–98 34 18 6 3 6 4 1 0 47 25
1998–99 26 11 3 0 3 1 2 0 34 12
1999–2000 19 3 5 3 7 6 2 0 33 12
2000–01 28 9 4 1 9 6 - - 41 16
2001–02 23 5 0 0 15 6 - - 38 11
2002–03 18 8 0 0 8 2 - - 26 10
2003–04 24 3 1 0 5 2 - - 30 5
Total 207 73 26 8 60 27 7 0 300 109
Career totals 400 102 53 13 94 28 11 0 558 144

International[edit]

[21]

Spain national team
Year Apps Goals
1991 1 0
1992 0 0
1993 2 0
1994 9 3
1995 8 0
1996 9 2
1997 4 2
1998 8 1
1999 8 4
2000 3 0
2001 5 0
2002 5 0
Total 62 12

Managerial[edit]

As of 1 March 2014.
Team Nat From To Record
G W D L GF GA GD Win %
Barcelona B Spain 18 June 2008 5 June 2011 118 57 36 25 200 135 +65 48.31
Roma Italy 8 June 2011 13 May 2012 38 16 8 14 60 54 +6 42.11
Celta Spain 8 June 2013 Present 28 9 6 13 33 41 −8 32.14
Total 184 82 50 52 293 230 +63 44.57

Other ventures[edit]

After retiring from football, Luis Enrique lived for a while in Australia to practice surfing. He took part in the 2005 edition of the New York City Marathon, finished the Amsterdam Marathon in 2006, the Firenze Marathon in 2007 and the Marathon des Sables in 2008, while also entering and finishing Frankfurt Ironman in 2007. He was supposed to take part in the Klagenfurt Ironman in July 2008, but eventually declined due to his Barcelona manager engagement.[22]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Antic: "Estoy seguro de que mi sistema es bueno" (Antic: "I'm sure my system is good"); El País, 17 August 1991 (Spanish)
  2. ^ El Madrid desborda a un lastimoso Sevilla (Madrid tears pityful Sevilla apart); El País, 29 September 1991 (Spanish)
  3. ^ El Madrid intentará golear al Logroñés en el Bernabéu (Madrid will try to rout Logroñés at the Bernabéu); El País, 14 March 1993 (Spanish)
  4. ^ El jugador más versátil (The most versatile player); El Mundo Deportivo, 12 August 1997 (Spanish)
  5. ^ Dudas (Doubts); El Mundo Deportivo, 25 September 1998 (Spanish)
  6. ^ Adriano: el "relevo" de Luis Enrique (Adriano: Luis Enrique's "replacement"); Barcelona's official website, 22 July 2010 (Spanish)
  7. ^ Luis Enrique bows out; BBC Sport, 10 August 2004
  8. ^ Pele's list of the greatest; BBC Sport, 4 March 2004
  9. ^ De nuevo vencidos y sin Gloria (Again beaten hopelessly); El Mundo Deportivo, 18 April 1991 (Spanish)
  10. ^ Luis Enrique full of respect; BBC Sport, 20 June 2002
  11. ^ Date set for Hendry decision; BBC Sport, 3 April 2001
  12. ^ Luis Enrique: "Espero que Villa me vengue ante Italia" (Luis Enrique: "I hope Villa avenges me with Italy"); Marca, 18 June 2008 (Spanish)
  13. ^ Luis Enrique, nuevo entrenador del Barcelona B (Luis Enrique, new Barcelona B coach); El País, 26 May 2008 (Spanish)
  14. ^ Luis Enrique se va a final de temporada (Luis Enrique leaves at the end of season); Barcelona's official website, 15 March 2011 (Spanish)
  15. ^ "Luis Enrique ha firmato "Farò calcio spettacolo"" [Luis Enrique has signed "I will produce spectacular football"] (in Italian). La Repubblica. 8 June 2011. Retrieved 8 June 2011. 
  16. ^ Serie A – Enrique's Roma lose opener; Yahoo! Sports, 11 September 2011
  17. ^ Luis Enrique's Roma experiment going up in smoke; Four Four Two, 26 April 2012
  18. ^ Luis Enrique lascia la Roma: Per me è una sconfitta (Luis Enrique leaves Roma: For me it's a loss); La Presse, 10 May 2012 (Italian)
  19. ^ "Barcelona set sights on Luis Enrique & Martino to replace Vilanova". Goal.com. 21 July 2013. Retrieved 21 July 2013. 
  20. ^ Includes the Supercopa de España
  21. ^ Luis Enrique Martínez García – Goals in International Matches; at RSSSF
  22. ^ Luis Enrique correrá el Maratón de las Arenas (Luis Enrique to run Marathon des Sables); Marca, 12 February 2008 (Spanish)

External links[edit]

Sporting positions
Preceded by
Sergi Barjuán
FC Barcelona captain
2002–2004
Succeeded by
Carles Puyol