Luís Fabiano

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In this name, the family name is Clemente, not Fabiano.
Luís Fabiano
JSP 0799.JPG
Luís Fabiano while at Sevilla in 2009
Personal information
Full name Luís Fabiano Clemente
Date of birth (1980-11-08) 8 November 1980 (age 33)
Place of birth Campinas, SP, Brazil
Height 1.85 m (6 ft 1 in)[1]
Playing position Striker
Club information
Current team
São Paulo
Number 9
Youth career
Ponte Preta
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1998–2000 Ponte Preta 12 (3)
2000–2002 Rennes 11 (0)
2001 São Paulo (loan) 22 (9)
2002–2004 São Paulo 65 (52)
2004–2005 Porto 22 (3)
2005–2012 Sevilla 149 (72)
2012– São Paulo 65 (33)
National team
2003–2013 Brazil 45 (28)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only and correct as of 13 June 2013.

† Appearances (Goals).

‡ National team caps and goals correct as of 18 October 2012

Luís Fabiano Clemente (born 8 November 1980), commonly known as Luís Fabiano, is a Brazilian footballer who plays for São Paulo FC as a striker.

Luís Fabiano is a prolific goalscorer and was ranked the 2nd highest scoring Brazilian of the 21st century IFFHS. [2]

Club career[edit]

Early career[edit]

Luís Fabiano enjoyed great success during two spells with Brazilian side São Paulo FC, with a disappointing period at French side Rennes sandwiched in between.[3] His strength on the ball, accurate finishing, and pace made him a vital part of the side that fell in the semi-finals of the 2004 Copa Libertadores de América. Luís Fabiano was labeled the "bad boy" of Brazilian football when playing for São Paulo after a number of brawls. During a 2003 Copa Sudamericana match for São Paulo against River Plate of Argentina, a fight between the players broke out. Luís Fabiano ran behind a River player and kicked him just below the neck. While being escorted off the field, Luís Fabiano said that he "would rather fight than take a penalty."[4] He was given a three-match ban from all competitions.

Porto[edit]

Luís Fabiano moved to Portugal to play for FC Porto in 2004 for a €1.875 million transfer fee; Porto, however, only bought 25% of his rights, the other 75% belonging to Global Soccer Investments (later renamed to Rio Football Services).[5][6] There, Luís Fabiano was reunited with his international teammate Diego, who he played with on the Copa América 2004.[7] He had a troublesome season, however, scoring only three goals in 22 matches. This led to Luís Fabiano being transferred to La Liga side Sevilla FC. Sevilla signed 25% economic right from Porto and later signed a further 10% from Rio Football Services for €1.2 million, with a pre-set price of remains 65% rights for €7.15 million to be excised on or before 15 April 2007, however it was never excised. Moreover, Sevilla had to pay Rio Football Services €450,000 annually. Eventually the third parties ownership had brought to the court.[5]

Sevilla[edit]

On 10 May 2006, Luís Fabiano scored a header during Sevilla's 4–0 victory over Middlesbrough in the UEFA Cup Final. The success continued in the 2007–08 season, as Luís Fabiano finished runner-up in the Pichichi Trophy with 24 goals (including two from the penalty spot), second only to Dani Güiza, who had a total of 27 goals. This led to Luís Fabiano being recalled to the Brazilian Seleção. On 29 November, Luís Fabiano was sent off for elbowing FC Barcelona's Sergio Busquets. He had to be restrained by the Sevilla staff.[8] In 2008, Luís Fabiano extended his contract with Sevilla to 2011.[9]

On 4 July 2009, Milan in Italy made an official offer for the Brazilian, according to the striker's agent, and Luís Fabiano reportedly pleaded with his club Sevilla to allow him to make the switch to the San Siro.[10] The deal, however, did not go through.

On 30 August 2010, Luís Fabiano put an end to the speculation with a move away from Sevilla by signing a contract extension until 2013, on the renewal he stated his intentions: "This is my home, I've been here six seasons and I will try to continue scoring goals and continue making history for Sevilla."

Return to São Paulo[edit]

On 13 March 2011, Luís Fabiano returned to Brazil to play again for São Paulo FC. The Brazilian club paid €7.6 million for the striker, who signed a four-year deal.[11][12] He was welcomed by 45,000 fans at his presentation at Morumbi Stadium. On 29 July 2012, playing against Flamengo, Fabiano scored two goals and thus became the seventh most prolific goalscorer of São Paulo History, outscoring the Brazilian legend Leônidas da Silva.[13] On 26 August 2012, Luís Fabiano scored twice in the win of São Paulo against Corinthians by 2–1. .[14]

In 2013, however, after a year that Fabiano was injured or had not good performances, he was charged by Muricy Ramalho, coach of club. According Ramalho, using Paulo Henrique Ganso, who recovered his good shape, as example, Fabiano needs "wanting more".[15]

International career[edit]

Luís Fabiano made his debut for Brazil on 11 June 2003 in a friendly against Nigeria, marking his international debut with a goal before being substituted. He was also included in Brazil's squad for 2003 FIFA Confederations Cup, but did not make any appearances.

He won the Copa América 2004 tournament with Brazil, where he started in all five matches alongside fellow striker Adriano. With his poor form in Europe with Porto and Sevilla, however, he did not make any further international appearances for more than three years. He was finally recalled to the national team on November 2007 for a 2010 FIFA World Cup qualification. On 19 November 2008, Luís Fabiano scored his first international hat-trick in a friendly match against Portugal in Brasília. The match ended in a 6–2 victory for Brazil.[16]

On 28 June 2009, he scored two goals in the Confederations Cup Final win against the United States.[17] He won the golden boot as the tournament's top scorer with five goals.[18]

Luís Fabiano scored his first international goal in nine months with a right-footed strike against Ivory Coast on 20 June 2010 in the 2010 FIFA World Cup. He followed it up with a second goal, which he scored after touching the ball with his hands on two occasions.[19] His third goal of the competition came against Chile in the Round of 16 on 29 June 2010, as Brazil won 3–0. On 11 September 2012 Fabiano was called up for the first time since the World Cup in Africa by then coach Mano Menezes for the two Super Classico de las Americas games in Brazil and Argentina.

Style of play[edit]

A prolific goalscorer with a strong physical presence against defenders and goalkeepers, Luís Fabiano nonetheless has a poor disciplinary record. Even as the top goalscorer in the 2013 season with 16 goals by June, he has received several red cards, affecting São Paulo in important games.[20]

Career statistics[edit]

Club[edit]

As of 18 October 2014

Club Season League Cup[21] Continental[22] Total
Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
Ponte Preta 1998 7 2 - - - - 7 2
1999 5 1 4 0 - - 9 1
2000 0 0 4 1 - - 4 1
Total 12 3 8 1 - - 20 4
Rennes 2000–01 7 0 - - - - 7 0
2001–02 4 0 1 0 - - 5 0
Total 11 0 1 0 - - 12 0
São Paulo 2001 22 9 4 5 6 2 32 16
2002 23 19 0 0 0 0 23 19
2003 34 29 8 8 4 1 46 38
2004 8 5 0 0 12 8 20 13
Total 87 62 12 13 23 11 121 86
Porto 2004–05 22 3 0 0 4 0 26 3
Total 22 3 0 0 4 0 26 3
Sevilla 2005–06 23 5 2 0 12 2 37 7
2006–07 26 10 3 1 9 4 38 15
2007–08 30 24 4 2 10 8 44 34
2008–09 26 8 7 7 4 2 37 17
2009–10 23 15 6 4 6 2 35 21
2010–11 21 10 4 1 8 2 33 13
Total 149 72 26 15 49 20 224 107
São Paulo 2011 10 6 0 0 2 1 12 7
2012 22 17 9 8 5 1 36 26
2013 24 6 0 0 13 7 37 13
2014 16 5 3 2 1 0 20 7
Total 72 34 12 10 21 9 105 53
São Paulo total 159 96 24 23 44 20 226 139
Career Total 353 174 59 39 96 40 508 253

Others[edit]

Intercontinental Cup

Season Club Cup Apps Goals
2004–05 Porto Intercontinental Cup 1 0

State League

Season Club League Apps Goals
1998 Ponte Preta Paulista A2 ?? 1
1999 ?? 10
2000 Paulista ?? 11
2001 São Paulo 9 5
2002 0 0
2003 10 8
2004 9 8
2012 8 5
2013 13 8
2014 14 9

Regional Cup

Season Club Cup Apps Goals
2001 São Paulo Torneio Rio – São Paulo 2 2

Brazilian Champions Cup

Season Club League Apps Goals
2001 São Paulo Copa dos Campeões 6 7
2002 2 2

Friendlies

Season Club League Apps Goals
2004 São Paulo Friendlies 1 0
2013 1 1
2014 2 1

International[edit]

As of 6 February 2013[23][24][25][26]
National team Club Season Apps Goals
Brazil São Paulo 2003 3 1
2004 9 5
Sevilla
2007–2008 8 3
2008–2009 11 13
2009–2010 12 6
São Paulo 2012 1 0
2013 1 0
Total 45 28

Personal life[edit]

Luís Fabiano is married to Juliana Paradela Clemente,[27] and has three children, Giovanna, Gabriella and Giulie.[28] In 2005, his mother was kidnapped by gunmen in Campinas.[29] She was rescued by police 62 days later.[30]

Honours[edit]

Club[edit]

São Paulo
FC Porto
Sevilla

International[edit]

Brazil

Individual[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ São Paulo Futebol Clube - Luis Fabiano
  2. ^ São Paulo Futebol Clube - Fabuloso é eleito o maior goleador brasileiro do século XXI
  3. ^ www.fabianoofficial.com coming soon!
  4. ^ Vickery, Tim (3 July 2005). "Rivals braced for triple showdown Retrieved Jun 28, 2009". BBC News. Retrieved 2010-06-26. 
  5. ^ a b Rio Football Services Hungary KFT v Sevilla Futbal Club SAD [2010] EWHC 2446 (QB) (6 October 2010)
  6. ^ http://www.fcporto.pt/IncFCP/PDF/Investor_Relations/FactosRelevantes/LuisFabiano_310804.pdf
  7. ^ "Porto adds quick-tempered, quick-footed Fabiano to roster". Sportsillustrated.cnn.com. 31 August 2004. Retrieved 2010-06-26. 
  8. ^ Sublime Barcelona Defeat Sevilla
  9. ^ "Fabiano extends Sevilla contract". Fifa.com. 19 July 2008. Retrieved 2010-06-26. 
  10. ^ "Fabiano pleads for Milan move". Sky Sports. 4 July 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-04. 
  11. ^ Mondal, Subhankar (11 March 2011). "Sao Paulo sign Sevilla striker Luis Fabiano in £6.6m deal". Goal.com. Retrieved 11 March 2011. 
  12. ^ Freitas, Kaue (12 March 2011). "Carpegiani: "Luis Fabiano é um atacante fora de série"" [Carpegiani: "Luis Fabiano is a outstanding attacker"]. São Paulo FC (in Portuguese). Retrieved 17 March 2011. 
  13. ^ Luis Fabiano bate Leônidas e é o sétimo maior artilheiro do Tricolor - São Paulo - Superesportes
  14. ^ "Luis Fabiano decide e garante virada do São Paulo sobre Corinthians". gazetaesportiva.net (in Portuguese). 26 August 2012. Retrieved 27 August 2012. 
  15. ^ [1]
  16. ^ Homewood, Brian (20 November 2008). "Soccer-Luis Fabiano hat-trick helps Brazil thump Portugal". Uk.reuters.com. Retrieved 2010-06-26. 
  17. ^ Dawkes, Phil (28 June 2009). "US 2–3 Brazil". BBC Sport. Retrieved 2009-06-30. 
  18. ^ "Top awards for Brazilian duo". FIFA. 28 June 2009. Retrieved 2009-06-30. 
  19. ^ Lewis, Aimee (20 June 2010). "Brazil 3–1 Ivory Coast". BBC Sport. Retrieved 2010-06-21. 
  20. ^ [2]
  21. ^ Includes Copa do Brasil, Coupe de la Ligue, Spanish Cup and Supercopa de España
  22. ^ Includes Copa Libertadores, Copa Sudamericana, Copa Mercosur, UEFA Champions League, UEFA Cup and UEFA Super Cup
  23. ^ "Seleção Brasileira (Brazilian National Team) 2002–2003". Rsssfbrasil.com. Retrieved 2010-06-26. 
  24. ^ "Seleção Brasileira (Brazilian National Team) 2004–2005". Rsssfbrasil.com. Retrieved 2010-06-26. 
  25. ^ "Seleção Brasileira (Brazilian National Team) 2006–2007". Rsssfbrasil.com. Retrieved 2010-06-26. 
  26. ^ "Seleção Brasileira (Brazilian National Team) 2008–2009". Rsssfbrasil.com. Retrieved 2010-06-26. 
  27. ^ "Jogador Luis Fabiano se casa em Campinas". Ofuxico (in Portuguese). 30 December 2005. Retrieved 31 January 2011. 
  28. ^ "The biography, the facts and the story of Luis Fabiano Fact File". Fabianoofficial.com. 8 November 1980. Retrieved 2010-06-26. [dead link]
  29. ^ Gotkine, Elliot (12 March 2005). "Gunmen seize Brazil star's mother". BBC News. Retrieved 2010-06-26. 
  30. ^ Fernando de Freitas in Rio de Janeiro (14 May 2005). "Footballer's kidnapped mother found in São Paulo". Abc.net.au. Retrieved 2010-06-26. 

External links[edit]