Luis and Clark

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Luis and Clark is a line of carbon fiber stringed instruments designed by cellist Luis Leguía of the Boston Symphony Orchestra.[1] The line currently consists of a violin, viola, cello and double bass, all of which are fabricated by Matt Dunham, a Rhode Island boat maker.[2][3] Plans for a classical guitar are also currently under development.[2][4]

Leguía, a boating enthusiast, got the idea for a carbon fiber cello in 1989 from hearing the waves resonate against his catamaran. He proceeded to spend five years in his basement developing and refining the process. By 1991 he had built three cellos, each progressively better than the last. However, he wanted his cellos to be even better, so he turned to carbon fiber expert Steve Clark, the head of Rhode Island's Vanguard Sailboats. Clark eventually would lead Leguía to Dunham, with whom he would establish the manufacturing agreement which exists today.[3]

The strength of the carbon fiber allows for a removal of the cornices of the instrument, thereby improving the sound. In addition, the instruments are immune to changes in weather, and highly resistant to damage. They are designed to be held closer to the body in order to reduce fatigue, a result of less material used in the instruments' creation.[3][5][6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Luis Leguía: Cello". Boston Symphony Orchestra. Retrieved 2007-05-31. 
  2. ^ a b "Clear Carbon and Components, Inc. - Musical Instruments". Clear Carbon and Components, Inc. 2007. Retrieved 2007-05-31. 
  3. ^ a b c Coleman, Sandy (2005-10-30). "Break from tradition sounds even sweeter". The Boston Globe. Retrieved 2007-05-31. 
  4. ^ "Luis and Clark - FAQs". Luis and Clark. Archived from the original on 2007-03-01. Retrieved 2007-05-23. 
  5. ^ "Luis and Clark - The Instruments". Luis and Clark. Archived from the original on 2007-03-06. Retrieved 2007-05-31. 
  6. ^ "United States Patent 6,284,957". Patent Storm. 2001-09-04. Retrieved 2009-03-25. 

External links[edit]