Lumbini Park

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Not to be confused with Lumbini, Nepal, Lumphini Park, Bangkok or Lumbini Gardens, Bangalore
Lumbini Park
Lumbini park, entrance.jpg
Entrance to the park
Type Urban park
Location Hussain Sagar, Hyderabad
Coordinates 17°24′36″N 78°28′20″E / 17.410°N 78.4722°E / 17.410; 78.4722 (Lumbini Park)Coordinates: 17°24′36″N 78°28′20″E / 17.410°N 78.4722°E / 17.410; 78.4722 (Lumbini Park)
Area 7.5 acres (3.0 ha)
Created 1994
Operated by Buddha Purnima Project Authority
Status Open all year

Lumbini Park is a small public, urban park of 7.5 acres (0.030 km2; 0.0117 sq mi) adjacent to Hussain Sagar in Hyderabad, India. Since it is located in the center of the city and is in close proximity to other tourist attractions, such as Birla Mandir and Necklace Road, it attracts many visitors throughout the year. Constructed in 1994, the park is maintained by the Buddha Purnima Project Authority that functions under the directives of the Government of Andhra Pradesh. In 2007, it was one of the targets of the 25 August 2007 Hyderabad bombings that killed 44 people.[1]

History[edit]

In 1994, Lumbini Park was constructed at a cost of INR 2.35 crores on 5 acres (0.020 km2; 0.0078 sq mi) of land adjacent to Hussain Sagar. In 2000, the Buddha Purnima Project Authority (BPPA) was established to maintain specially designated development areas in Hyderabad. Among tourist attractions such as Necklace Road and NTR Gardens, Lumbini Park is being maintained by BPPA.[2] To enhance the inflow of visitors, it constructed additional facilities for laser auditorium, boating facilities among other visually appealing features such as gardens and musical fountains.[2]

In 2006, the park was named as T. Anjaiah Lumbini Park in honour of the late Chief Minister of Andhra Pradesh.[3]

Buddha statue in Lumbini Park

2007 terrorist attacks[edit]

On August 25, 2007, a series of bomb blasts in Hyderabad killed 44 people and injured 60.[1] One of the two blasts occurred during the evening hours in the laser auditorium that housed about 500 people at the time of the incident.[4] After a few days of being cordoned off for crime scene investigation, the park was reopened to public after the installation of metal detectors.[5]

Features[edit]

A parcel of 2.5 acres (0.010 km2; 0.0039 sq mi) adjacent to the park was acquired from the Andhra Pradesh Tourism Department for constructing the laser auditorium. This auditorium, believed to be the first of its kind in India, can seat up to 2000 people at a time for a show on Hyderabad's history.[6][7] This was one of the initiatives for the park which was one of the key areas to support the World City strategy for Hyderabad and to broadcast Nepalese Culture Worldwide.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Kamalapurkar, Shwetal (2007-08-25). "Death toll in Hyderabad serial blasts rises to 44". IBNLive.com. Retrieved 2008-08-17. 
  2. ^ a b "Buddha Purnima Project Authority". Hyderabad Urban Development Authority. Retrieved 2008-08-17. [dead link]
  3. ^ "YSR reiterates promise on housing for the poor". The Hindu. 2006-08-17. Retrieved 2008-08-17. 
  4. ^ Amin Jafri, Syed (2007-08-25). "Hyderabad: 42 killed, 50 injured in twin blasts". Rediff.com. Retrieved 2008-08-17. 
  5. ^ "Lumbini Park reopens today". The Hindu. 2007-08-30. Retrieved 2008-08-17. 
  6. ^ "Trial run of laser show begins today". The Hindu. 2005-01-14. Retrieved 2008-08-17. 
  7. ^ Singh, Khurshchev (2007-09-13). "Hyderabad Woes: Mecca Masjid, Lumbini Park...". Institute of Defence Studies & Analysis. Retrieved 2008-08-17. [dead link]
  8. ^ Ramanathan, Gayatri (2003-04-03). "Hi-tech entertainments on the anvil for Hyderabad". The Times of India. Retrieved 2008-08-17. 

External links[edit]