Luna Negra Dance Theater

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Luna Negra Dance Theater was a dance ensemble that celebrated the richness and diversity of Latino culture through the creation of works by contemporary Latino choreographers. Founded by Cuban-born dancer and choreographer Eduardo Vilaro, the company steered away from folkloric representations and utilized a variety of dance form styles such as Flamenco, Tango or Salsa with contemporary dance movement.[1]

Luna Negra made its home in Chicago at the Harris Theater in Millennium Park, and toured nationally and internationally..[1][2] It focused on the work of Latin choreographers such as,[3] Ron DeJesus, Vicente Nebrada, Gustavo Ramirez Sansano, and Annabelle Lopez Ochoa.[4] The company performed in Chicago at Ravinia Festival, The Harris Theater for Music and Dance, Symphony Center, The Dance Center of Columbia College, Dance Chicago, the Ruth Page Dance Series locally and had toured nationally and internationally to places such as Spain, Panama and Mexico.[4] The dance ensemble made its New York City debut at the New Victory Theater in January 2008.[2][3][5] In the community Luna Negra offered intensive, hands-on education programs that encouraged discovery and exploration of personal and community identity .

When the Harris Theater opened in 2003, it provided an aspiration for small dance companies such as Luna Negra.[6] Luna Negra quickly achieved its goal of performing there,[7][8] and it celebrated its tenth season at the Harris Theater in September of 2008.[9] In past seasons, it co-habitated with the Joffrey Ballet, Hubbard Street Dance Chicago and Concert Dance Inc. at Ravinia Festival.[10][11] The company also performed on the schedule at Ravinia without these other Chicago dance companies.[12][13] In its summer 2008 season, Luna Negra was the opening performance for Ravinia Festival.[14]

In 2010, Luna Negra welcomed Gustavo Ramirez Sansano as its second artistic director in the company's history. Under Mr. Ramirez's leadership Luna Negra continued to soar with explosive and imaginative works that challenged cultural representations and developed new possibilities for the company. In 2013 Luna Negra ceased operations due to financial stress.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Luna Negra Dance Theater". Harris Theater for Music and Dance. Retrieved 2008-08-29. 
  2. ^ a b Simián, José Manuel (2008-01-21). "All-hispanic Luna Negra dance company debuts in New York". New York Daily News. NYDailyNews.com. Retrieved 2008-08-29. 
  3. ^ a b Kourlas, Gia (2008-01-28). "Seeking Raw Beauty in Fluid Movement". The New York Times. The New York Times Company. Retrieved 2008-08-29. 
  4. ^ a b "About Luna Negra". Luna Negra Dance Theater. Archived from the original on 2008-06-10. Retrieved 2008-08-29. 
  5. ^ "Dance Listings". The New York Times. The New York Times Company. 2008-01-25. Retrieved 2008-08-29. 
  6. ^ Smith, Sid (2003-11-02). "The Harris Theater is ready, but can dancers afford rent?". Chicago Tribune. Newsbank. Retrieved 2008-08-29. 
  7. ^ Vitello, Barbara (2006-11-10). "Dance companies premiere new works". Daily Herald. Newsbank. Retrieved 2008-08-29. 
  8. ^ Weiss, Hedy (2003-11-02). "On the Latin beat - Vilaro's dance piece celebrates mambo pioneer". Chicago Sun-Times. Newsbank. Retrieved 2008-08-29. 
  9. ^ Malik, Farrah, and Eric Eatherly (2008-08-19). "LUNA NEGRA DANCE THEATER LAUNCHES ITS 10th ANNIVERSARY SEASON WITH "CICLOS," A PROGRAM FEATURING TWO WORLD PREMIERES AND A WORK TO MARK THE JOSÉ LIMÓN CENTENNIAL" (Press release). Silverman Group. 
  10. ^ Dunning, Jennifer (2006-05-14). "From Salsa to Ballet and Beyond". The New York Times. The New York Times Company. Retrieved 2008-08-29. 
  11. ^ Dunning, Jennifer (2004-05-02). "SUMMER FESTIVALS: DANCE; Guess What: Even More Balanchine". The New York Times. The New York Times Company. Retrieved 2008-08-29. 
  12. ^ Andries, Dorothy (2005-03-10). "Mahler, Mozart and more - Ravinia Festival announces summer classical music schedule". Deerfield Review. Newsbank. Retrieved 2008-08-29. 
  13. ^ Dunning, Jennifer (2005-05-01). "Up on the Toes or Down Barefoot". The New York Times. The New York Times Company. Retrieved 2008-08-29. 
  14. ^ Dunning, Jennifer (2008-05-11). "SUMMER STAGES; Summer Stages". The New York Times. The New York Times Company. Retrieved 2008-08-29. 

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