Luncarty

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Coordinates: 56°27′06″N 3°28′11″W / 56.451644°N 3.469857°W / 56.451644; -3.469857

Luncarty
Scottish Gaelic: Longartaidh
Luncarty is located in Perth and Kinross
Luncarty
Luncarty
 Luncarty shown within Perth and Kinross
OS grid reference NO095298
Council area Perth and Kinross
Lieutenancy area Perth and Kinross
Country Scotland
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town PERTH
Postcode district PH1
Dialling code 01738
Police Scottish
Fire Scottish
Ambulance Scottish
EU Parliament Scotland
UK Parliament Ochil and South Perthshire
Scottish Parliament Perthshire North
List of places
UK
Scotland

Luncarty (About this sound listen ; pronounced Lung-cur-tay) [ˈlʌŋkəɾte]) is a village in Perth and Kinross, Scotland, approximately four miles north of Perth. It lies between the A9 to the west, and the River Tay to the east.

History[edit]

War memorial at Luncarty

The historian Hector Boece (1465–1536), in his History of the Scottish People, records that, in 990, Kenneth III of Scotland defeated the Danes near Luncarty Clan Hay.[1] However, the Scottish historian John Hill Burton strongly suspected the battle of Luncarty to be an invention of Hector Boece.[2][3] In fact, Burton was incorrect. Walter Bower,[4] writing in his Scotichronicon around 1440, some 87 years before Boece first published his Scotorum Historia, refers to the battle briefly as follows:

"that remarkable battle of Luncarty, in which the Norsemen with their king were totally destroyed". Bower does not quote specific sources concerning the battle, but, two sentences later, he refers in a general way to ancient writings that he has consulted. The term Norsemen would include Danes.

The present village was founded in 1752 by William Sandeman, to house workers at his bleachfields.[5] The village formerly had a railway station, and the Perth to Inverness railway line still runs through the village.

Bleachfields[edit]

William Sandeman and his partner Hector Turnbull manufactured linen in Perth and bleached it in Luncarty, for instance with an order of 12,000 to 15,000 yards of "Soldiers' shirting". In 1752 he leveled 12 acres (49,000 m2) of land in Luncarty to form bleachfields. By 1790 when William died, the Luncarty bleachfields covered 80 acres (320,000 m2) and processed 500,000 yards of cloth annually. Second only to agriculture, linen manufacture was a major Scottish industry in the late 18th century — linen then became less important with the introduction of cotton.[6]

Sport[edit]

Luncarty is home to the junior football club Luncarty F.C.

Notable persons[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Groome, Francis H. (1882–1885). "Luncarty". Ordnance Gazetteer of Scotland: A Survey of Scottish Topography, Statistical, Biographical and Historical. Gazetteer for Scotland. Retrieved 2008-07-09. 
  2. ^ The History of Scotland from Agricola's Invasion to the Revolution of 1688,Vol.1, By John Hill Burton; p.364-365, Will. Blackwood and Sons, 1867
  3. ^ A Complete Guide to Heraldry; p.415; By Arthur Charles Fox Davies, and Graham Johnston; Published by Kessinger Publishing, 2004; ISBN 1-4179-0630-8, ISBN 978-1-4179-0630-7; link
  4. ^ S Taylor, DER Watt, B Scott, eds (1990). Scotichronicon by Walter Bower in Latin and English.Vol.5. Aberdeen: Aberdeen University Press. pp. 341–343. 
  5. ^ "Luncarty". Gazetteer for Scotland. Retrieved 2008-07-09. 
  6. ^ Perth Entrepreneurs: the Sandemans of Springfield by Charles D Waterston, 2008, pages 27–33: these pages reference 19 other information sources. ISBN 978-0-905452-52-4

External links[edit]