Luther Martin Kennett

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Luther Martin Kennett (March 15, 1807– April 12, 1873) was a U.S. Representative from Missouri.

Born in Falmouth, Kentucky, Kennett attended private schools. Deputy county clerk of Pendleton County in 1822 and 1823 and of Campbell County, Kentucky, in 1824. He moved to St. Louis, Missouri, in 1825. He was employed in a mercantile establishment. Later engaged in lead mining and the manufacture of shot in Jefferson and St. Francis Counties, Missouri. He returned to St. Louis in 1842. City alderman 1843-1846. He declined to be a candidate for reelection. Spent several years in Europe on account of ill health, returning to St. Louis in 1849. He served as vice president of the Pacific Railroad Co.. He served as mayor of St. Louis 1850-1853 as a member of the Whig party. He served as president of the St. Louis & Iron Mountain Railroad in 1853.

Kennett was elected as an Opposition Party candidate to the Thirty-fourth Congress (March 4, 1855 – March 3, 1857). He was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection. He retired to his home near St. Louis Missouri. He went to Europe in 1867, where he remained until his death in Paris, France, April 12, 1873. He was interred in Bellefontaine Cemetery, St. Louis, Missouri.

The city of Kennett, Missouri is named after him.[1]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Eaton, David Wolfe (1916). How Missouri Counties, Towns and Streams Were Named. The State Historical Society of Missouri. p. 165. 

References[edit]

Political offices
Preceded by
James G. Barry
Mayor of St. Louis, Missouri
1850–1853
Succeeded by
John How
United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Thomas Hart Benton
Member from Missouri's 1st congressional district
1855–1857
Succeeded by
Francis Preston Blair, Jr.