Lyon OU

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Lyon OU
Lyon Olympique Universitaire.svg
Full name Lyon Olympique Universitaire
Nickname(s) Les Loups (The Wolves)
Founded 1896; 118 years ago (1896)
Location Lyon, France
Ground(s) Matmut Stadium (Capacity: 8,000)
President Yvan Patet
Coach(es) Matthieu Lazerges
Raphaël Saint-André
League(s) Top 14
2013–14 1st, Pro D2 (Champions and promoted)
1st kit
2nd kit
Official website
www.lourugby.fr
LOU Rugby against Stade Montois at the Vuillermet Stadium in Lyon, Pro D2 season 2004-2005

Lyon Olympique Universitaire or LOU is a French rugby union team that will compete in the Top 14, the highest level of the country's professional league system, in the 2014–15 season after winning the 2013–14 title in the second-level Pro D2. They were last relegated from the Top 14 at the end of the 2011–12 season, having earned their spot in the Top 14 by winning the 2010–11 Pro D2 crown.

They were founded in 1896 and play in red and black. They are based in Lyon in Rhône-Alpes, and play at the Matmut Stadium in Lyon, having moved from the Stade Vuillermet in 2011.

History[edit]

Le LOU, as it is traditionally known, is one of the oldest sports clubs in France and among the first outside Paris to have set up a rugby section. The club’s original name was Racing Club, the result of a merger of the Racing Club de Vaise and the Rugby Club de Lyon. It was renamed Racing et Cercles Réunis in 1902 after several other clubs joined it, then a few months later Lyon Olympique. Finally, in 1910, it became Lyon Olympique Universitaire. The red and black were adopted in 1902.

The club developed several sections (it now has 13), one of the most successful being the rugby union section, which is now known as LOU Rugby. The rugby club took part in three successive French championship finals (1931–33), losing the first one to Toulon (3-6) but winning the next two against Narbonne (9-3 and 10-3). It then played in lower amateur leagues until it was promoted back to the second professional division (Pro D2). In 2006-07, it had the second biggest budget of the championship and its ambition was to rejoin the Top 14 in the next two years, under the leadership of their coach Christian Lanta, who formerly led Racing Club de France, Italian club Treviso and Agen. However, they would not succeed in their promotion quest until 2011.

Honours[edit]

Finals results[edit]

French championship[edit]

Date Winner Runner-up Score Venue Spectators
10 May 1931 RC Toulon Lyon OU 6-3 Parc Lescure, Bordeaux 10,000
5 May 1932 Lyon OU RC Narbonne 9-3 Parc Lescure, Bordeaux 13,000
7 May 1933 Lyon OU RC Narbonne 10-3 Parc Lescure, Bordeaux 15,000

Challenge Yves du Manoir[edit]

Year Winner Score Runner-up
1932 SU Agen round robin Lyon OU
1933 Lyon OU round robin SU Agen

Current standings[edit]

2014–15 Top 14 Table watch · edit · discuss
Club Played Won Drawn Lost Points For Points Against Points Difference Tries For Tries Against Try Bonus Losing Bonus Points
1 Toulon 12 8 0 4 367 230 +137 44 20 4 1 37
2 Clermont 12 8 0 4 312 209 +103 29 15 3 1 36
3 Stade Français 12 8 0 4 263 292 –29 28 28 4 0 35
4 Racing Métro 12 7 0 5 266 237 +29 27 20 2 3 33
5 Grenoble 12 7 0 5 311 354 −43 28 34 2 2 32
6 Bordeaux 12 6 0 6 339 282 +57 32 26 2 3 29
7 Toulouse 12 6 0 6 270 245 +25 22 19 2 2 28
8 Montpellier 12 6 0 6 246 224 +22 20 19 1 2 27
9 Oyonnax 12 5 0 7 266 258 +8 20 21 2 3 25
10 Bayonne 12 4 1 7 243 252 –9 19 23 2 3 23
11 Brive 12 5 0 7 248 296 −48 22 29 1 2 23
12 Lyon 12 5 0 7 232 302 −70 22 27 0 2 22
13 La Rochelle 12 4 1 7 248 349 −101 21 39 2 1 21
14 Castres 12 4 0 8 233 304 −71 21 35 2 2 20

If teams are level at any stage, tiebreakers are applied in the following order:

  1. Competition points earned in head-to-head matches
  2. Points difference in head-to-head matches
  3. Try differential in head-to-head matches
  4. Points difference in all matches
  5. Try differential in all matches
  6. Points scored in all matches
  7. Tries scored in all matches
  8. Fewer matches forfeited'
  9. Classification in the previous Top 14 season
Green background (rows 1 and 2) receive semi-final play-off places and receive berths in the 2015–16 European Rugby Champions Cup.
Blue background (rows 3 to 6) receive quarter-final play-off places, and receive berths in the Champions Cup.
Yellow background (row 7) indicates the team that advances to a play-off against the winner of the Pro12 vs Aviva Premiership play-off, or 2014–15 European Rugby Challenge Cup winner if they have not already qualified for the Champions Cup.[1]
Plain background indicates teams that earn a place in the European Rugby Challenge Cup.
Red background (row 13 and 14) will be relegated to Rugby Pro D2. Updated 30 November 2014

Current squad[edit]

For player movements leading up to the 2014–15 season, see List of 2014–15 Top 14 transfers#Lyon.

2014–15 Note: Flags indicate national union as has been defined under WR eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-WR nationality.

Player Position Union
Jean-Philippe Bonrepaux Hooker France France
Vincent Colliat Hooker France France
Damien Fitzpatrick Hooker Australia Australia
Deon Fourie Hooker South Africa South Africa
Bogdan Balan Prop Romania Romania
Nahuel Tetaz Chaparro Prop Argentina Argentina
Wian du Preez Prop South Africa South Africa
Hoani Tui Prop New Zealand New Zealand
Jérémy Castex Prop France France
Sven Holtzinger Prop France France
Emmanuel Felsina Prop France France
Guram Kavtidze Prop Georgia (country) Georgia
Anthony Roux Prop France France
Coenraad Basson Lock South Africa South Africa
Joe Tuineau Lock Tonga Tonga
Lionel Nallet Lock France France
Karim Ghezal Lock France France
Mickael De Marco Lock France France
Jean Sousa Flanker France France
Pierrick Gunther Flanker France France
Julien Puricelli Flanker France France
George Smith Flanker Australia Australia
Nicolas Bontinck Flanker France France
Eugène N'Zi Flanker France France
Juan Manuel Leguizamón Number 8 Argentina Argentina
Sakiusa Matadigo Number 8 Fiji Fiji
Charles Malet Number 8 France France
Player Position Union
Ricky Januarie Scrum-half South Africa South Africa
Mathieu Lorée Scrum-half France France
Stephen Brett Fly-half New Zealand New Zealand
Waisele Sukanaveita Centre Fiji Fiji
Laurent Tranier Centre France France
Alexandre Mourot Centre France France
Fabrice Estebanez Centre France France
Paul Bonnefond Centre France France
Kendrick Lynn Centre New Zealand New Zealand
Mosese Ratuvou Wing Fiji Fiji
Thibaut Regard Wing France France
Lachie Munro Wing New Zealand New Zealand
Vincent Martin Wing France France
Jérôme Porical Fullback France France
Romain Loursac Fullback France France
Toby Arnold Fullback New Zealand New Zealand

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Future of European Rugby resolved" (Press release). RFU. 10 April 2014. Retrieved 11 June 2014. 

External links[edit]