Lyriocephalus

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Lyriocephalus
Lyriocephalus scutatus.jpg
Conservation status
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Reptilia
Order: Squamata
Family: Agamidae
Subfamily: Draconinae
Genus: Lyriocephalus
Merrem, 1820
Species: L. scutatus
Binomial name
Lyriocephalus scutatus
(Linnaeus, 1758)
Lyriocephalus scutatus distribution.png

Lyriocephalus scutatus is a species of lizard within the agamid family, the only species in the genus Lyriocephalus. It is the largest agamid endemic to Sri Lanka[2] and lives in dense wet zone forests.[3] It is also called the Hump-nosed Lizard, Hump Snout Lizard or the Lyreshead Lizard. In Sinhalese language, it is known as "Kandukara Bodilima - කදුකර බෝදිලිමා."

Habitat & Distribution[edit]

A large agamid lizard, widespread in the wet lowlands and the midhills, from 25m up to elevation of 1650m. A number of localities are known, such as Ratnapura, Udawatta Kele Sanctuary, Gannoruwa, Gammaduwa, Hanthana, Mathugama, Knuckles Mountain Range, Adam's Peak, Gampola, Kandy and Sinharaja Rain Forest.

Description[edit]

Body is laterally compressed. Pair of small spines present at back of the head. Dorso-nuchal crest developed. Forehead scales keeled. A distinct bony arch appear on the head of adults. Tympanum absent. A V-shaped gular sac present. Large, keeled gualr scales can be seen. Tail is short and compressed with a blunt tip. Dorsum is light geen. Throat yellow. Rest of the venter is cream colored.

Ecology & Diet[edit]

Inhabited in forests with high canopy, it also enters home gardens, and is found on low trees as well as on the ground. Active at day, it ascending higher reaches of trees to sleep at night. The typical threat posture is open-mouth gape, revealing the bright red lining of the oral cavity. This species is also known to feign death when picked up. Diet comprises essentially of earthworms and also arthropods, including termites, butterflies, and moths. Young shoots and buds are also known to feed.

Reproduction[edit]

About 1-11 eggs with measuring 12-13 * 20-22mm per clutch are produced in the months of January, March, May, June, September, October, and December. Eggs are buried after laid in the soil, sometimes under bushes. Incubation period lasts 35 days.

Pictures[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Somaweera, R.; and de Silva, A. (2009). "Lyriocephalus scutatus". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2010.4. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 9 November 2010. 
  2. ^ Somaweera, R.; and de Silva, A. (2009). "Lyriocephalus scutatus". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2010.4. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 9 November 2010. 
  3. ^ [1], The Reptile Database

External links[edit]