Māori All Blacks

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Not to be confused with New Zealand Māori rugby league team.
Māori All Blacks
Union New Zealand Rugby Union
Nickname(s) New Zealand Māori
Emblem(s) Silver fern
Coach(es) New Zealand Colin Cooper
Captain(s) New Zealand Tim Bateman
Team kit
First match
New Zealand Hawke's Bay 0–5 New Zealand Natives New Zealand
(23 June 1888)
Largest win
British Columbia British Columbia 3–111 New Zealand Māori New Zealand
(9 June 2004)
Largest test win
 United States 6–74 New Zealand Māori New Zealand
(7 June 2006)
Largest defeat
New Zealand New Zealand Māori 0–37 South Africa 
(25 August 1956)
Largest test defeat
New Zealand New Zealand Māori 0–37 South Africa 
(25 August 1956)
Official website
www.allblacks.com

The Māori All Blacks, previously called the New Zealand Māori, is a rugby union team from New Zealand. A representative team of the New Zealand Rugby Union, a prerequisite for playing in this team is that the player is to have Māori whakapapa or genealogy. In the past this rule was not strictly applied; non–Māori players who looked Māori were often selected in the team. These included a few Island players and a couple of African descent. Today all players have their ancestry verified before selection in the team.

The team's first ever match was in 1888 against Hawke's Bay, and their first international match in 1888 against Ireland in Dublin. This was followed by a tour of Europe in 1888 and 1889 where the team suffered their first Test defeat—to Wales in Swansea.

The team's early uniforms consisted of a black jersey with a silver fern and white knickerbockers. New Zealand Māori perform a haka—a Māori challenge or posture dance—before each match. The haka was later adopted by the New Zealand national team, the All Blacks, as were their black shirts. In 2001, the Māori first performed the "Timatanga" haka, which describes the evolution of life and the creation of New Zealand from the four winds.

The Māori All Blacks competed in the Churchill Cup, which they won in 2004 and 2006, and in the Pacific Nations Cup, which they won in 2008. In November 2012, the team played three matches in England, against the Canada at Oxford University RFC, the Leicester Tigers and an RFU Championship XV consisting of English-qualified players from the second tier RFU Championship.[1]

Since being given official status in 1910, the New Zealand Maori have selected some of rugby union's great players, including fullback George Nepia who played 46 games for New Zealand from 1924–30, halfback Sid Going who played 86 matches for his country and former New Zealand captain Tane Norton, who represented New Zealand in 61 games, including 27 tests, and later became president of the New Zealand Rugby Union.

History[edit]

The team was renamed the Maori All Blacks in 2012, having been previously called the New Zealand Maori and New Zealand Maoris. The first official New Zealand Maoris team was selected in 1910. However, the 1888 New Zealand Natives team, one of the first of New Zealand's national rugby teams and the first to wear black jerseys, was originally conceived as an all-Māori selection and ultimately included just five non-Māori players in its ranks.

The team is a selection of the best of New Zealand's Māori rugby players and boasts a proud history of defeating national sides. At matches in New Zealand in 2010 to mark one hundred years of Māori All Blacks rugby, the team defeated Ireland and England, having beaten the British and Irish Lions in 2005. Many members have gone on to play for the All Blacks.

The team pioneered the black jersey, the silver fern and performing a haka before kickoff, all now synonymous with New Zealand sport.

The New Zealand Natives[edit]

The New Zealand Natives' football team prior to playing Queensland in July 1889

In 1888–89, the 'New Zealand Natives' were the first overseas team to tour the Home Nations. At first the team was meant to comprise only Māori, but four "whites" were finally included to strengthen the combination. The tour was a private endeavour, and was not an official representative team. The tour was organised by Joseph Warbrick, promoted by Thomas Eyton, and managed by James Scott. The team played 107 matches during their tour. Although most of the matches played were Rugby football, the team also played Victorian Rules football and Association football in Australia. The squad consisted of 26 players, and they achieved a record of 78 wins, 6 draws, and 23 losses. They had success over international side, Ireland, but lost to Wales and England.

The idea for a team of Māori team of footballers to tour Britain was that of Joseph Warbrick. He had initially proposed a team of Māori or part-Māori play the touring British side in 1888. This developed into a venture to have a Māori team Britain if a preliminary tour of New Zealand was successful. After learning of Warbrick's plans, Thomas Eyton contacted him to help manage the tour. Eventually James Scott joined the partnership, and the roles of the three were decided; Warbrick as captain, Scott as manager, and Eyton as promoter. Warbrick started assembling a team for the tour in early 1888. He did have difficulties assembling a team due to player availability, and failed to secure Jack Taiaroa due to his university commitments. Some players who were available for the tour withdrew due to the inclusion of part-Māori in the team. There were twenty Māori players selected for the team. However after the defeat to Auckland five Pakeha players were added to the team. Due to the inclusion of Pakeha players the team was renamed from the New Zealand Māori to the New Zealand Native Football Representatives. The final team consisted of 26 players including Warbrick. The team toured New Zealand before departing overseas. The team played against Hawke's Bay, Auckland, Nelson, Wellington, Canterbury, South Canterbury, and Otago. The first game was held against Hawke's Bay in Napier on 23 June 1888. They played nine games in their preliminary tour of New Zealand of which seven were won. Their last match was against Otago and was won one try to nil was played in Dunedin on 31 July 1888. The team departed for Australia from Dunedin on 1 August 1888. The team arrived in Melbourne where Scott recruited a Victorian Rules coach Jack Lawlor to coach the team while they were in Britain for possible Victorian Rules matches on their return to Australia. The team did play two matches while in Melbourne; both were rugby matches against the Melbourne Rugby Union team with the first won, and the second a draw They departed from Melbourne to Britain via Suez. The team arrived in London on 27 September 1888.

Māori All Blacks and apartheid[edit]

New Zealand has a long history of sporting contact with South Africa, especially through rugby union. Until the 1970s this resulted in discrimination against Māori players, since the apartheid political system in South Africa for most of the twentieth century did not allow people of different races to play sport together, and therefore South African officials requested that Māori players not be included in sides which toured their country. Despite some of New Zealand's best players being Māori, this was agreed to, and Māori were excluded from tours of South Africa, including the Māori All Blacks.

Nonetheless in the early period, South Africa did play the Māori All Blacks. In April 2010 it was revealed by Muru Walters that in 1956 Ernest Corbett, Minister of Māori Affairs, had told the team to deliberately lose to the Springboks "for the future of rugby". The Māori team lost 37-0. This was followed by Walters calling for the New Zealand government to apologise for the way it treated Māori rugby players.[2]

Professional era[edit]

British & Irish Lions playing the New Zealand Māori in 2005

The professional era in Māori rugby union began in 1994, marked the team lost only four of its 26 games played between 1994 and 2004, including beating England, Argentina, Scotland and Fiji. The Māori continued their winning form in 2004 beating the England Saxons in extra time in the final of the Churchill Cup in Canada.

One of their two annual tournaments is a competition involving the Pacific top national teams, the Pacific Nations Cup. From 2008 they replaced the Junior All Blacks, where they were undefeated champions, narrowly beating Australia A in the final game of the tournament. The Churchill Cup was another, winning in 2004 after they returned to the competition in 2006, defeating Ireland A and the USA in pool play in Santa Clara, California and Scotland A in the final in Edmonton, Alberta.

In 2005 the Māori beat the British and Irish Lions for the first time in an official match. Their preparations for this match forced them to withdraw from the 2005 Churchill Cup. In August 2012, NZRU announced the Māori All Blacks would play three matches in the United Kingdom, including an international fixture against Canada. Jamie Joseph was coach with assistance from Daryl Gibson.[3]

Haka[edit]

Performing the haka prior to their match against the United States in 2013.

One of the New Zealand Natives' greatest legacies was the haka, a traditional Māori posture dance with vigorous movements and stamping of the feet, to the accompaniment of rhythmically shouted words; this was first performed during a match on 3 October against Surrey. The haka was later adopted by the New Zealand national team, the All Blacks. In 2001, the Māori first performed the "Timatanga" haka, which describes the evolution of life and the creation of New Zealand from the four winds. This dramatic haka, Timatanga, was written especially for the New Zealand Maori team by team kaumātua (elder) Whetu Tipiwai. It tells the Maori story of the creation from the void, the nothingness, the darkness to what we have today. It also tells of a gathering of young warriors, young chiefs, young rugby players who are making a statement and setting aims, objectives and strategies to achieve matauranga (knowledge), whanaunatanga (unity) and taumatatanga (excellence).

This is not only for the present but for the future of Maori rugby and each individual’s mana (prestige), whanau (family), hapu (sub-tribe) and iwi (tribe). This will increase their oranga (well-being) both wairua (spiritually), hinengaro (mentally) and tinana (physically).

Matches against International sides[edit]

New Zealand Māori matches against international sides from 1996 till present, including the New Zealand Natives 1888 and 1889 tour. These results are only against full international sides, including the British and Irish Lions. Not against second national teams.[4]

Opposing Teams For Against Result Date Venue City Competition
 Ireland 13 4 Won 1888-12-01 Lansdowne Road Dublin Tour Match
 Wales 0 5 Lost 1888-12-22 St. Helen's Swansea Tour Match
 England 0 7 Lost 1889-02-16 Rectory Field Blackheath Tour Match
 Australia 12 6 Won 1913-09-27 Alexandra Park Auckland Australia Tour Match
 South Africa 8 9 Lost 1921-09-07 McLean Park Napier South Africa Tour Match
 Australia 25 22 Won 1922-06-24 Royal Agricultural Showground Sydney Tour Match
 Australia 13 28 Lost 1922-06-26 Royal Agricultural Showground Sydney Tour Match
 Australia 23 22 Won 1922-07-08 Royal Agricultural Showground Sydney Tour Match
 New Zealand 14 21 Lost 1922-08-19 Athletic Park Wellington Friendly
 Australia 23 27 Lost 1923-06-16 Royal Agricultural Showground Sydney Tour Match
 Australia 16 21 Lost 1923-06-23 Royal Agricultural Showground Sydney Tour Match
 Australia 12 14 Lost 1923-06-25 Royal Agricultural Showground Sydney Tour Match
 France 12 3 Won 1926-12-26 Stade Olympique Yves-du-Manoir Paris Tour Match
 New Zealand 18 37 Lost 1929-10-02 Athletic Park Wellington Friendly
British and Irish Lions 13 19 Lost 1930-07-09 Athletic Park Wellington Lions Tour Match
 Australia 3 14 Lost 1931-09-09 FMG Stadium Palmerston North Australia Tour Match
 Australia 6 31 Lost 1936-09-23 FMG Stadium Palmerston North Australia Tour Match
 Fiji 3 3 Draw 1938-08-20 Albert Park Suva Tour Match
 Fiji 5 11 Lost 1938-08-24 Albert Park Suva Tour Match
 Fiji 6 3 Won 1938-08-27 Albert Park Suva Tour Match
 Fiji 4 14 Lost 1939-09-16 Rugby Park Hamilton Fiji Tour Match
 Australia 20 0 Won 1946-09-25 Rugby Park Hamilton Australia Tour Match
 Fiji 22 6 Won 1948-07-31 Albert Park Suva Tour Match
 Fiji 8 9 Lost 1948-08-04 Albert Park Suva Tour Match
 Fiji 14 6 Won 1948-08-07 Albert Park Suva Tour Match
 Australia 12 3 Won 1949-06-04 Sydney Cricket Ground Sydney Tour Match
 Australia 8 8 Draw 1949-06-11 Brisbane Exhibition Ground Brisbane Tour Match
 Australia 3 18 Lost 1949-06-25 Sydney Cricket Ground Sydney Tour Match
British and Irish Lions 9 14 Lost 1950-08-02 Athletic Park Wellington Lions Tour Match
 Fiji 14 21 Lost 1951-09-05 Athletic Park Wellington Tour Match
 New Zealand 22 28 Lost 1952-07-26 Athletic Park Wellington Friendly
 Fiji 12 19 Lost 1954-08-14 Churchill Park Lautoka Tour Match
 Fiji 16 8 Won 1954-08-21 Buckhurst Park Suva Tour Match
 Fiji 9 6 Won 1954-08-24 Buckhurst Park Suva Tour Match
 South Africa 0 37 Lost 1956-08-25 Eden Park Auckland South Africa Tour Match
 Fiji 13 36 Lost 1957-08-10 Athletic Park Wellington Fiji Tour Match
 Fiji 8 17 Lost 1957-08-24 Carisbrook Dunedin Fiji Tour Match
 Australia 14 15 Lost 1958-06-14 Brisbane Exhibition Ground Brisbane Tour Match
 Australia 3 3 Draw 1958-06-28 Sydney Cricket Ground Sydney Tour Match
 Australia 13 6 Won 1958-07-05 Olympic Park Stadium Melbourne Tour Match
 New Zealand 26 8 Lost 1958-07-09 Eden Park Auckland Friendly
British and Irish Lions 6 12 Lost 1959-09-05 Eden Park Auckland Lions Tour Match
 Tonga 16 27 Lost 1960-05-21 Teufaiva Sport Stadium Nuku'alofa Tour Match
 Samoa 28 6 Won 1960-06-04 Apia Park Apia Tour Match
 Samoa 31 5 Won 1960-06-11 Apia Park Apia Tour Match
 France 5 3 Won 1961-07-29 McLean Park Napier France Tour Match
 Fiji 26 9 Won 1964-07-25 Buckhurst Park Suva Tour Match
 South Africa 3 9 Lost 1965-08-28 Athletic Park Wellington South Africa Tour Match
British and Irish Lions 14 16 Lost 1966-08-13 Eden Park Auckland Lions Tour Match
 Tonga 19 26 Lost 1969-08-16 Lancaster Park Christchurch Tonga Tour Match
 Tonga 6 19 Lost 1969-09-06 Eden Park Auckland Tonga Tour Match
 Fiji 11 6 Won 1970-07-25 Lancaster Park Christchurch Fiji Tour Match
 Fiji 9 9 Draw 1970-08-08 Eden Park Auckland Fiji Tour Match
British and Irish Lions 12 23 Lost 1971-06-02 Eden Park Auckland Lions Tour Match
 Samoa 11 6 Won 1973-05-10 Apia Park Apia Tour Match
 Samoa 12 0 Won 1973-05-12 Apia Park Apia Tour Match
 Tonga 3 11 Lost 1973-05-22 Teufaiva Sport Stadium Nuku'alofa Tour Match
 Fiji 6 4 Won 1973-06-02 Buckhurst Park Suva Tour Match
 Fiji 9 3 Won 1973-06-09 Churchill Park Lautoka Tour Match
 New Zealand 8 18 Lost 1973-08-08 Rotorua International Stadium Rotorua Friendly
 Fiji 24 9 Won 1974-08-17 Eden Park Auckland Fiji Tour Match
 Fiji 39 25 Won 1974-08-31 Athletic Park Wellington Fiji Tour Match
 Tonga 23 16 Won 1975-07-19 Rugby Park New Plymouth Tonga Tour Match
 Tonga 37 7 Won 1975-08-02 Eden Park Auckland Tonga Tour Match
 Samoa 19 6 Won 1976-07-17 Rotorua International Stadium Rotorua Samoa Tour Match
 Samoa 24 8 Won 1976-07-24 Eden Park Auckland Samoa Tour Match
British and Irish Lions 19 22 Lost 1977-07-13 Eden Park Auckland Lions Tour Match
 Fiji 19 13 Won 1979-05-19 Buckhurst Park Suva Tour Match
 Samoa 26 3 Won 1979-05-22 Apia Park Apia Tour Match
 Tonga 26 9 Won 1979-05-25 Teufaiva Sport Stadium Nuku'alofa Tour Match
 Fiji 22 9 Won 1980-08-30 Rotorua International Stadium Rotorua Fiji Tour Match
 South Africa 12 12 Draw 1981-08-25 McLean Park Napier South Africa Tour Match
 Wales 19 25 Lost 1982-11-13 National Stadium Cardiff Tour Match
 Spain 66 3 Won 1982-11-20 Campo Central de la Ciudad Universitaria Madrid Tour Match
 Tonga 28 4 Won 1983-06-06 Rotorua International Stadium Rotorua Tonga Tour Match
 Tonga 52 4 Won 1983-06-13 Eden Park Auckland Tonga Tour Match
 Spain 22 12 Won 1988-11-05 Instalaciones Deportivas La Cartuja Seville Tour Match
 Cook Islands 29 17 Won 1992-10-10 National Stadium Raratonga Tour Match
 Tonga 33 10 Won 1992-10-24 Teufaiva Sport Stadium Nuku'alofa Tour Match
 Fiji 35 34 Won 1992-10-31 National Stadium Suva Tour Match
British and Irish Lions 20 24 Lost 1993-05-29 Athletic Park Wellington Lions Tour Match
 Fiji 34 13 Won 1994-06-04 Lancaster Park Christchurch Fiji Tour Match
 Samoa 28 15 Won 1996-06-14 Ericsson Stadium Auckland Samoa Tour Match
 Fiji 25 10 Won 1996-11-01 National Stadium Suva Tour Match
 Tonga 29 20 Won 1996-11-08 Teufaiva Sport Stadium Nuku'alofa Tour Match
 Argentina 39 17 Won 1997-06-14 McLean Park Napier Argentina Tour Match
 Samoa 34 20 Won 1997-08-21 Apia Park Apia Tour Match
 Tonga 66 7 Won 1998-06-19 Lowe Walker Stadium Whangarei Tonga Tour Match
 England 62 14 Won 1998-06-23 Rotorua International Stadium Rotorua England Tour Match
 Scotland 24 8 Won 1998-11-14 Murrayfield Stadium Edinburgh Tour Match
 Fiji 57 20 Won 1999-08-03 National Stadium Suva Tour Match
 Scotland 18 15 Won 2000-06-17 Yarrow Stadium New Plymouth Scotland Tour Match
 Australia 29 41 Lost 2001-06-09 Sydney Football Stadium Sydney Tour Match
 Argentina 43 24 Won 2001-06-26 Rotorua International Stadium Rotorua Argentina Tour Match
 Australia 23 27 Lost 2002-06-15 Subiaco Oval Perth Tour Match
 Tonga 47 12 Won 2003-06-02 North Harbour Stadium Albany Tonga Tour Match
 England 9 23 Lost 2003-06-09 Yarrow Stadium New Plymouth England Tour Match
 Canada 65 27 Won 2003-07-26 Kingsland Calgary Tour Match
 Canada 30 9 Won 2003-08-02 York Stadium Toronto Tour Match
 United States 69 31 Won 2004-06-12 Calgary Rugby Park Calgary Churchill Cup
 Fiji 29 27 Won 2005-06-03 Albert Park Suva Tour Match
British and Irish Lions 19 13 Won 2005-06-11 Waikato Stadium Hamilton Lions Tour Match
 United States 74 6 Won 2006-06-08 Buck Shaw Stadium Santa Clara Churchill Cup
 Canada 59 23 Won 2007-05-26 Franklin's Gardens Northampton Churchill Cup
 Tonga 20 9 Won 2008-06-07 North Harbour Stadium Albany Pacific Nations Cup
 Fiji 11 7 Won 2008-06-14 Churchill Park Lautoka Pacific Nations Cup
 Samoa 17 6 Won 2008-06-21 Waikato Stadium Hamilton Pacific Nations Cup
 Japan 65 22 Won 2008-06-28 McLean Park Napier Pacific Nations Cup
 Ireland 31 28 Won 2010-06-18 Rotorua International Stadium Rotorua Centenary Series Match
 England 35 28 Won 2010-06-23 McLean Park Napier Centenary Series Match
 Canada 32 19 Won 2012-11-23 Oxford University Oxford Tour Match
 Canada 40 15 Won 2013-11-03 BMO Field Toronto Tour Match
 United States 29 19 Won 2013-11-09 PPL Park Philadelphia Tour Match
 Japan 2014-11-01 Noevir Stadium Kobe Tour Match
 Japan 2014-11-08 Chichibunomiya Rugby Stadium Tokyo Tour Match

Overall[edit]

Against Played Won Lost Drawn Win %
 Argentina 2 2 0 0 100.00%
 Australia 18 6 10 2 33.33%
British and Irish Lions 8 1 7 0 12.50%
 Canada 5 5 0 0 100.00%
 Cook Islands 1 1 0 0 100.00%
 England 4 2 2 0 50.00%
 Fiji 28 19 7 2 67.86%
 France 2 2 0 0 100.00%
 Ireland 2 2 0 0 100.00%
 Japan 1 1 0 0 100.00%
 New Zealand 5 0 5 0 0.00%
 Samoa 10 10 0 0 100.00%
 Scotland 2 2 0 0 100.00%
 South Africa 4 0 3 1 0.00%
 Spain 2 2 0 0 100.00%
 Tonga 14 10 4 0 71.43%
 United States 3 3 0 0 100.00%
 Wales 2 0 2 0 0.00%
Total 113 68 40 5 60.18%

Squad for 2013 November tour[edit]

New Zealand Māori 29-man squad for the 2013 North America November Tour, facing Canada (3 November) and United States (9 November).[5]

Note: Bold denotes players that have represented the Māori All Blacks in previous tours.
Note: Flags indicate national union as has been defined under IRB eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-IRB nationality.

Player Position Date of Birth (Age) Club/province Iwi
Ash Dixon Hooker (1988-09-01) 1 September 1988 (age 26) New Zealand Hawke's Bay/Hurricanes Ngāti Tahinga
Hikawera Elliot Hooker (1986-01-22) 22 January 1986 (age 28) New Zealand Counties Manukau/Chiefs Ngāti Awa
Corey Flynn Hooker (1981-01-05) 5 January 1981 (age 33) New Zealand Canterbury/Crusaders Ngāi Tahu
Quentin MacDonald Hooker (1988-09-25) 25 September 1988 (age 26) New Zealand Tasman Rangitane
Joe Royal Hooker (1985-05-31) 31 May 1985 (age 29) New Zealand Bay of Plenty Te Arawa / Ngāti Whātua
Ben Afeaki Prop (1988-01-12) 12 January 1988 (age 26) New Zealand North Harbour/Chiefs Ngāti Awa
Nick Barrett Prop (1988-11-01) 1 November 1988 (age 25) New Zealand Southland Ngāti Kahungunu
Chris Eves Prop (1987-12-11) 11 December 1987 (age 26) New Zealand Manawatu/Hurricanes Tainui
Kane Hames Prop (1988-08-28) 28 August 1988 (age 26) New Zealand Bay of Plenty/Highlanders Ngāi Tūhoe / Ngāti Porou
Jarrad Hoeata Lock (1983-12-12) 12 December 1983 (age 30) New Zealand Taranaki/Highlanders Ngāti Kahungunu / Ngāi Tūhoe
Luke Katene Lock (1986-06-04) 4 June 1986 (age 28) New Zealand Canterbury Ngāti Toa
Joe Wheeler Lock (1987-10-20) 20 October 1987 (age 27) New Zealand Tasman/Highlanders Ngāi Tahu
Luke Braid Flanker (1988-10-05) 5 October 1988 (age 26) New Zealand Auckland/Blues Ngāti Rāhiri Tumutumu
Shane Christie Flanker (1985-09-23) 23 September 1985 (age 29) New Zealand Tasman/Highlanders Te Āti Haunui-a-Pāpārangi
Elliot Dixon Number 8 (1989-09-04) 4 September 1989 (age 25) New Zealand Southland/Highlanders Ngāpuhi
Liam Squire Number 8 (1991-03-20) 20 March 1991 (age 23) New Zealand Tasman/Chiefs Ngāi Tahu
Blade Thomson Number 8 (1990-12-04) 4 December 1990 (age 23) New Zealand Taranaki/Hurricanes Ngāpuhi
Jamison Gibson-Park Scrum-half (1992-02-23) 23 February 1992 (age 22) New Zealand Taranaki/Blues Ngāti Porou / Ngāi Tai
Chris Smylie Scrum-half (1982-03-22) 22 March 1982 (age 32) New Zealand Taranaki/Hurricanes Ngāti Mutunga
Piri Weepu Scrum-half (1983-09-07) 7 September 1983 (age 31) New Zealand Auckland/Blues Te Whakatōhea / Ngāi Tahu
Ihaia West Fly-half (1992-01-16) 16 January 1992 (age 22) New Zealand Hawke's Bay/Blues Ngati Kahungunu / Ngāti Porou
Tim Bateman (c) Centre (1987-06-03) 3 June 1987 (age 27) New Zealand Wellington/Hurricanes Ngāi Tahu
Charlie Ngatai Centre (1990-08-17) 17 August 1990 (age 24) New Zealand Taranaki/Chiefs Ngāti Porou / Te Whanau-a-Apanui
Jackson Willison Centre (1988-09-05) 5 September 1988 (age 26) New Zealand Waikato/Blues Ngāti Mahuta
Zac Guildford Wing (1989-02-08) 8 February 1989 (age 25) New Zealand Hawke's Bay/Crusaders Ngāti Kahungunu / Ngāi Tahu
Matt Proctor Wing (1992-10-26) 26 October 1992 (age 21) New Zealand Wellington/Hurricanes Ngāi Te Rangi / Ngāpuhi
Kurt Baker Fullback (1988-10-07) 7 October 1988 (age 26) New Zealand Taranaki/Highlanders Ngāpuhi
Robbie Robinson Fullback (1989-08-22) 22 August 1989 (age 25) New Zealand Southland/Chiefs Ngāti Tuwharetoa
Andre Taylor Fullback (1988-01-11) 11 January 1988 (age 26) New Zealand Taranaki/Hurricanes Ngāti Tuwharetoa / Ngāti Kahungunu

Squad notes[edit]

Tim Bateman took captaincy from Tanerau Latimer, who has made himself unavailable to have surgery on a long-standing arm injury. Several players were not considered due to injury including Ross Filipo and Bronson Murray. Ash Dixon replaced Corey Flynn after being ruled out of the tour through injury. Hikawera Elliot and Piri Weepu sustained injuries during the North American Tour and were replaced by Quentin MacDonald and Chris Smylie.[6]

Notable players[edit]

Original members of the New Zealand Natives, 1888–1889[edit]

The squad consisted of 26 players. The exact names of several of the players is unknown. The number of matches played is a minimum number only—the line-ups for a number of matches in Britain and Australia are either incomplete or unknown. This team was inducted into the International Rugby Board Hall of Fame.

   

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]