MMA gloves

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A pair of standard MMA gloves

MMA gloves or grappling gloves are small, open-fingered gloves used in mixed martial arts bouts. They usually have around 4-6 oz of padding and are designed to provide some protection to the person wearing the glove, but leave the fingers available for grappling maneuvers such as clinch fighting and submissions.

History[edit]

Small, open-fingered gloves were first mandatory in Japan's Shooto promotion and were later adopted by the UFC as it developed into a regulated sport. Gloves were introduced to protect fighters' fists from injuries, as well as reduce the number of facial lacerations (and stoppages dues to cuts) that fighters experienced without gloves. The introduction of gloves was also intended to encourage fighters to use their hands for striking to allow more captivating matches for fans. There are some similarities to the wrist-supporting, closed-thumb, broken-knuckle kempo gloves popularized by Bruce Lee's 1973 movie Enter the Dragon.

Types and use[edit]

Gina Carano wears MMA gloves during a bout.

Most professional fights have the fighters wear 4 ounce (110 g) gloves, whereas amateurs may wear a slightly heavier 6 ounce (170 g) glove for increased protection.

Impact of gloves on safety and injuries[edit]

The impact of gloves on the injuries caused during a fight is a controversial issue, mostly looked at in relation to boxing. Studies have shown that use of large 'boxing style' gloves fights cause more severe and more long-term brain and eye injuries than bare-knuckle fights,[1][2] although the incidence of superficial injuries (cuts, bruising) is reduced. In part, this can also be attributed to more, shorter rounds in modern fights made possible by the use of gloves, which results in longer fights than earlier and that boxers punch harder while wearing gloves. Before gloves were introduced, boxers rarely hit to the head, because of risk of breaking their own fists.

See also[edit]

Media related to MMA gloves at Wikimedia Commons

References[edit]

  1. ^ British Medical Journal: The Boxing Debate
  2. ^ Dillner L. Boxing should be counted out, says BMA report. BMJ. 1993;306:1561–1562.