Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine

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Michigan State University
College of Osteopathic Medicine
Established 1969
Type Public
Dean William D. Strampel, D.O.[1]
Academic staff 2000[2]
Students 300 per class[2]
Location East Lansing;
Macomb;
Detroit
, Michigan, USA
Campus Rural and Urban
Tuition (2011-2012) $36,741 resident[3]
$78,891 non-resident[3]
Website com.msu.edu

The Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine (MSUCOM) is an American osteopathic medical school and academic division of Michigan State University (MSU) located in East Lansing, Michigan. In addition to the Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (D.O.) degree, the college also offers the DO/PhD combined degree for students interested in the Medical Scientist Training Program.[4] MSUCOM operates three campuses in East Lansing, Macomb, and Detroit Medical Center. The college is accredited by the American Osteopathic Association's Commission on Osteopathic College Accreditation (COCA) and by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools.[5]

U.S. News & World Report has released its annual evaluation of the top graduate schools in the United States, and the Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine was listed in the Top 20. In 2014, MSUCOM ranked ninth among all medical schools in United States of America for primary care education and first in producing the most primary care residents.[6][7] The rankings are based on a variety of factors including peer assessments, student achievement, selectivity and — in this particular category — the number of graduates who enter primary care. Selection is made from a competitive applicant pool and depends on many aspects of the applicant such as GPA, MCAT, maturity, and life experiences.

History[edit]

The Michigan College of Osteopathic Medicine (MCOM) admitted its first students in 1969 at its facility in Pontiac, Michigan.[8] On September 19, 1969, Michigan State University agreed to adopt the program. MCOM was renamed the Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine when the campus was transferred to East Lansing in 1971. The first dean of MSUCOM was Myron S. Magen, D.O.[8] It was the first osteopathic medical school to open since 1916,[9] and the first university-based osteopathic school.[10]

As of July 2009, the Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine started conducting courses at two expansion sites: Detroit Medical Center downtown, and at the Macomb University Center. The expansion was approved by the MSU Board of Trustees in May 2007, and the Commission on Osteopathic College Accreditation approved the expansion in September 2008.[11]

MSU-COM started a pilot program in 2011 for training Canadian students to become osteopathic physicians.[12] The program currently accepts 25 Canadian students each year.

Academics[edit]

The college offers the Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine degree, and a dual D.O./PhD program. The D.O./PhD program was founded in 1986, adding studies in bioethics in 2007 and medical anthropology in 2009.[13]

Training locations[edit]

The College of Osteopathic Medicine conducts pre-clinical training at three different campuses in East Lansing, Macomb, and Detroit. Clinical training for the third and fourth year students occurs at community hospitals throughout Michigan.

Affiliated hospitals[edit]

Currently, there are 30 hospital locations affiliated with MSUCOM through their "Statewide Campus System."[14]

Notable alumni[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "MSU COM dean's message". Retrieved 2010-01-01. 
  2. ^ a b "MSU COM fact sheet". Retrieved 2010-01-01. 
  3. ^ a b "AACOM Member Colleges". Retrieved 2012-05-19. 
  4. ^ "MSU COM DO/PhD program". Retrieved 2010-01-01. 
  5. ^ "Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine". American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine. 2013. Retrieved May 12, 2012. 
  6. ^ "Best Medical Schools: Primary Care". U.S. News & World Report. 2014. Retrieved 13 March 2014. 
  7. ^ "Which schools turn out the most primary care residents?". U.S. News & World Report, LP. 2014. Retrieved 13 March 2014. 
  8. ^ a b "Brief History of the MSU College of Osteopathic Medicine". Retrieved 2010-01-01. 
  9. ^ "Schools By Year of Inaugural Class". American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine. Retrieved 10 July 2012. 
  10. ^ Gevitz, Norman (2004). The DO's: osteopathic medicine in America. Baltimore, Maryland: Johns Hopkins University Press. ISBN 0-8018-7833-0. 
  11. ^ "MSU’s College of Osteopathic Medicine marks Detroit grand opening". MSU.edu. Retrieved 10 April 2013. 
  12. ^ Schierhorn, Carolyn (Nov 21, 2011). "MSUCOM pilot program targets Canadian students for training". The DO. Retrieved 15 July 2012. 
  13. ^ McCann, Daniel (March 3, 2011). "MSUCOM’s DO-PhD program trains bench-to-bedside-savvy researchers". The DO. Retrieved 15 July 2012. 
  14. ^ "Statewide Campus System". Retrieved 2010-01-01. 

External links[edit]