MV Esperanza

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Esperanza
Esperanza on the River Thames off Gravesend, England, August 2010.
Career
Name: MV Esperanza
Operator: Greenpeace
Port of registry: Amsterdam, Netherlands
Builder: Gdansk, Poland
Launched: 1984
Acquired: 2000
Identification: Call sign: PD 6464
Status: in active service, as of 2014
Notes: Former name: Echo Fighter
General characteristics
Type: Expedition/research ship
Tonnage: 2,076 GT
Length: 72.3 m (237 ft 2 in) o/a
Beam: 14.3 m (46 ft 11 in)
Draft: 4.7 m (15 ft 5 in)
Propulsion: 2 × 2,938 bhp (2,191 kW) Sulzer V12 engines
Speed: 16 kts
Boats & landing
craft carried:
2 large and 3 small rigid hull inflatables (RHIB)
Crew: 33
Aviation facilities: Helipad

MV Esperanza is a ship operated by Greenpeace. Previous to being a Greenpeace ship it was a fire-fighter owned by the Russian Navy, built in 1984. It was recommissioned in 2000 and launched in 2002 after being named Esperanza ('hope' in Spanish) by visitors to the Greenpeace website. It had undergone a major refit by Greenpeace to make it more environmentally friendly. A new helicopter deck and boat cranes were also added.

The ship has a heavy ice class,[clarification needed] giving it the ability to work in polar regions. It has a top speed of 16 knots and an overall length of 72.3 m. This makes it the fastest and largest of the Greenpeace fleet.[1]

It has been involved in many campaigns, starting with the logging 'save or delete' campaign and currently in the Arctic off the coast of Greenland, protesting against an offshore drilling project by Cairn Energy.[2]

Video equipment aboard[edit]

Greenpeace added live webcams to the Esperanza in 2006. The webcams are positioned on the bow of the ship, the mast and the bridge, they send a new image every minute to their Defending Our Oceans website and provide an archive of action.

In April 2006, the Esperanza was equipped with state-of-the-art underwater monitoring equipment, including a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) which can shoot video down to a depth of 300 m, and a drop camera capable of reaching depths of 1,000 m.

See also[edit]

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