Ma Liang (general)

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For other people named Ma Liang, see Ma Liang.
Ma Liang
Allegiance  Republic of China
Service/branch Army
Years of service 1950–1953
Rank Lieutenant General
Unit 103rd Route Army
Commands held Commander-in-chief of the 103rd Route Army
Battles/wars Kuomintang Islamic Insurgency in China (1950–1958)
This is a Chinese name; the family name is Ma.

Ma Liang (traditional Chinese: 馬良; simplified Chinese: 马良; pinyin: Mǎ Liáng) [1] was a Chinese Muslim General and a member of the Ma Clique.

He was related to former Governor Ma Bufang of Qinghai, and he had 2,000 Chinese Muslim troops under his command around Gansu/Qinghai during the Kuomintang Islamic Insurgency in China (1950–1958). Chiang Kai-shek sent agents in May 1952 to communicate with him, and Chiang offered him the post of Commander-in-chief of the 103rd Route of the Kuomintang army, which was accepted by Ma. The CIA dropped supplies such as ammunition, radios, and gold at Nagchuka to Ma Liang.[2] Ma Yuanxiang was another Chinese Muslim General related to the Ma family.[3] Ma Yuanxiang and Ma Liang wreaked havoc on the Communist forces. In 1953, Mao Zedong was compelled to take radical action against them.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hsiao-ting Lin (2010). Modern China's Ethnic Frontiers: A Journey to the West. Taylor & Francis. p. 126. ISBN 0-415-58264-4. Retrieved 2010-06-28. 
  2. ^ Hsiao-ting Lin (2010). Modern China's Ethnic Frontiers: A Journey to the West. Taylor & Francis. p. xxii. ISBN 0-415-58264-4. Retrieved 2010-06-28. 
  3. ^ Hsiao-ting Lin (2010). Modern China's Ethnic Frontiers: A Journey to the West. Taylor & Francis. p. xxi. ISBN 0-415-58264-4. Retrieved 2010-06-28. 
  4. ^ Hsiao-ting Lin (2010). Modern China's Ethnic Frontiers: A Journey to the West. Taylor & Francis. p. 122. ISBN 0-415-58264-4. Retrieved 2010-06-28.