Maasbommel

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Maasbommel
Town
Coat of arms of Maasbommel
Coat of arms
LocatieWestMaasEnWaal.png
The town centre (red) and the statistical district (light green) of Maasbommel in the municipality of West Maas en Waal.
The town centre (red) and the statistical district (light green) of Maasbommel in the municipality of West Maas en Waal.
Coordinates: 51°49′15″N 5°32′11″E / 51.82083°N 5.53639°E / 51.82083; 5.53639Coordinates: 51°49′15″N 5°32′11″E / 51.82083°N 5.53639°E / 51.82083; 5.53639
Country Netherlands
Province Gelderland
Municipality West Maas en Waal
Area
 • Total 10.68 km2 (4.12 sq mi)
Population (31 December 2008)
 • Total 1,343
 • Density 130/km2 (330/sq mi)
Time zone CET (UTC+1)
 • Summer (DST) CEST (UTC+2)
Postal code 6627

Maasbommel is a town in the Dutch province of Gelderland. It is a part of the municipality of West Maas en Waal, and lies about 7 km north of Oss. It received city rights in 1328.

Maasbommel was a separate municipality until 1818, when it was merged with Appeltern.[1]

In 2001, the town of Maasbommel had 615 inhabitants. The built-up area of the town was 0.28 km², and contained 255 residences.[2] The statistical area "Maasbommel", which also can include the peripheral parts of the village, as well as the surrounding countryside, has a population of around 1320.[3]

Maasbommel is known as the place where pioneering floating amphibious houses have been built.[4][5][6][7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ad van der Meer and Onno Boonstra, "Repertorium van Nederlandse gemeenten", KNAW, 2006. [1]
  2. ^ Statistics Netherlands (CBS), Bevolkingskernen in Nederland 2001. (Statistics are for the continuous built-up area).
  3. ^ Statistics Netherlands (CBS), Statline: Kerncijfers wijken en buurten 2003-2005. As of 1 January 2005.
  4. ^ Kroeger, Alix (2007-03-01). "Dutch pioneer floating eco-homes". BBC News. Retrieved 2010-07-21. 
  5. ^ "Amphibious Houses: Dutch Answer to Flooding: Build Houses that Swim - SPIEGEL ONLINE - News - International". Spiegel.de. Retrieved 2010-07-21. 
  6. ^ "From floating houses to rafts of hyacinths". Post Carbon Cities. 2007-11-26. Retrieved 2010-07-21. 
  7. ^ "Dutch Architects Plan for a Floating Future". NPR. Retrieved 2010-07-21.