MacNaughton Mountain

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MacNaughton Mountain
MacNaughton Mt NY seen from Duck Hole dam.jpg
MacNaughton Mt. (summit centre) seen from Duck Hole
Elevation 3,983 ft (1,214 m)[1]
Prominence 833 ft (254 m)[1]
Listing Adirondack High Peaks
Location
Location North Elba, Essex County, New York
Range Street Range
Coordinates 44°08′23″N 74°03′52″W / 44.1397768°N 74.064317°W / 44.1397768; -74.064317Coordinates: 44°08′23″N 74°03′52″W / 44.1397768°N 74.064317°W / 44.1397768; -74.064317[2]
Topo map USGS Ampersand Lake

MacNaughton Mountain is a mountain located in Essex County, New York, named after James MacNaughton (1851–1905),[3] the grandson of Archibald McIntyre. The mountain is part of the Street Range of the Adirondack Mountains.

The western slopes and north end of MacNaughton Mountain drain into Preston Ponds and Duck Hole pond, the source of the Cold River, which drains into the Raquette River, the Saint Lawrence River in Canada, and into the Gulf of Saint Lawrence. The eastern slopes and south end of MacNaughton Mtn. drain into the southern Indian Pass Brook, thence into Henderson Lake, the source of the Hudson River, and into New York Bay.

MacNaughton Mountain is within the High Peaks Wilderness Area of New York's Adirondack Park.

According to early surveys, MacNaughton Mountain's elevation was 3,976 ft (1,212 m), short of the 4,000 ft needed to qualify it as one of the Adirondack High Peaks. According to the 1953 survey, the mountain did reach that height, while four of the 46 peaks on the list fell short.[4] However, the list was kept the same because those were the original 46. Since then, a survey has measured the elevation at exactly 3,983 ft (1,214 m).

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "MacNaughton Mountain, New York". Peakbagger.com. Retrieved 2012-12-20. 
  2. ^ "MacNaughton Mountain". Geographic Names Information System, U.S. Geological Survey. Retrieved 2012-12-20. 
  3. ^ "James MacNaughton Dead / President of the MacIntyre Iron Company a Victim of Pneumonia.". New York Times. December 30, 1905. Retrieved 2007-11-08. Mr. MacNaughton was by profession a civil engineer. ... He was prominently identified with the Association for the Protection of the Adirondacks, of which he was a Vice President. 
  4. ^ "Santanoni, NY Quadrangle". Historic USGS Maps of New England & New York. University of New Hampshire. 15 January 2002. Retrieved 2007-11-08.  MacNaughton Mountain is in the southeast corner.

External links[edit]