MacBook Pro

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MacBook Pro
Macbook Pro Retina 13 2013.jpg
A 13" MacBook Pro with Retina Display
Developer Apple Inc.
Type Laptop
Release date January 10, 2006 (original release)
June 11, 2012 (latest Unibody release)
February 13, 2013 (Unibody type with a retina display screen)
July 29, 2014 (latest Retina release)
Operating system OS X
Predecessor PowerBook G4
Website Apple – MacBook Pro

The MacBook Pro is a line of Macintosh portable computers introduced in January 2006 by Apple Inc., and now in its third generation. Replacing the PowerBook G4, the MacBook Pro was the second model, after the iMac, to be announced in the Apple–Intel transition. It is also the high-end model of the MacBook family and is currently produced with 13- and 15-inch screens, although a 17-inch version was previously offered.

The first generation MacBook Pro appeared externally similar to the PowerBook G4, but used the Intel Core processors instead of PowerPC G4 chips. The 15-inch model was released in January 2006, a 17-inch model in April, both of which received several updates and Core 2 Duo processors later in the year.

The second model, known as the "unibody" model, has a more tapered design and a casing made from a single block of aluminum. It debuted in October 2008 as the 15-inch MacBook Pro and the 13-inch aluminum unibody MacBook. The following January brought the design to the 17-inch model, along with the built-in battery that joined the rest of the MacBook Pro line in June, including the 13-inch model which Apple absorbed into the MacBook Pro line. Subsequent updates brought upgraded Intel Core i5 and i7 processors and introduced Intel's Thunderbolt technology.

Apple released the third generation of MacBook Pro in June 2012 as a 15-inch screen size only. At the same time, slightly updated versions of the previous 13- and 15-inch unibody models were announced that will sell in parallel, although Apple has delisted and discontinued the 17-inch variant. While dimensionally smaller than its predecessor, the similarly styled third generation model still retains a unibody design. The most substantial differences in the next-generation MacBook Pro are the fitting of a significantly higher resolution Retina display, the elimination of the optical drive, and replacement of hard disk drives with solid-state drives. A third generation 13-inch MacBook Pro was released on October 23, 2012. As with the 15-inch, it includes a Retina display.

On October 22, 2013 Apple held its Fall Keynote address in San Francisco and announced that it had updated the 13-inch and 15-inch MacBook Pro with Retina display. Both versions introduced the new Haswell chipset. In addition, Apple cut the price of both laptops by $200 due to the planned discontinuation of the non-retina MacBook Pro.

First generation[edit]

First-generation 15-inch MacBook Pro, displaying Mac OS X Leopard.

The original 15-inch MacBook Pro was announced on January 10, 2006, by Steve Jobs at the Macworld Conference & Expo.[1] The 17-inch model was unveiled on April 24, 2006.[2] The first design was largely a carryover from the PowerBook G4, but used Intel Core CPUs instead of PowerPC G4 chips.[3] The 15-inch Macbook Pro weighed the same as the 15-inch aluminum PowerBook G4, but was 0.1 inches (0.25 cm) deeper, 0.4 inches (1.0 cm) wider, and 0.1 inches (0.25 cm) thinner.[4] Other changes from the PowerBook include a built-in iSight webcam and the inclusion of MagSafe, a magnetic power connector designed to detach easily when pulled to prevent the entire laptop from being pulled off a surface. Both features were later brought over to the MacBook. In order to fit into the slimmer MacBook Pro, the optical drive was half the speed of the one in the PowerBook G4 and could not write to dual layer DVDs.[3][5]

Both the original 15- and 17-inch model MacBook Pros come with ExpressCard/34 slots, which replace the PC Card slots found in the PowerBook G4. All pre-unibody 15-inch models have two USB 2.0 ports and one FireWire 400 port,[6] while the 17-inch models have three USB 2.0 ports as well as one FireWire 400 port.[7] When first introduced, the MacBook Pro did not come with FireWire 800 or S-Video ports,[4][6] although FireWire 800 was added in the next 15-inch model revision[8] and was present in every version of the 17-inch design.[7] S-Video capability can be attained through the use of a DVI to S-Video adapter.[4] External displays with up to a 2,560 × 1,600 pixel resolution are supported through a dual-link DVI port.[9] All models include a built-in Gigabit Ethernet port, Bluetooth 2.0, and 802.11a/b/g.[6][7] Later models include support for the draft 2.0 specification of 802.11n[10] and Bluetooth 2.1.

Updates[edit]

Apple refreshed the entire MacBook Pro line on October 24, 2006, to include Intel Core 2 Duo processors.[8] Memory capacity was doubled for each model, to 1 GB on the low-end 15-inch and 2 GB for the high-end 15- and 17-inch models.[8] FireWire 800 was added to the 15-inch models. Hard drive capacity was increased, although video card options stayed the same.[8] The MacBook Pro line received a second update on June 5, 2007 with new Nvidia Geforce 8600M GT video cards and faster processor options.[11][12] LED backlighting was added to the 15-inch model's screen, and its weight was reduced from 5.6 pounds (2.5 kg) to 5.4 pounds (2.4 kg).[12] Furthermore, the speed of the front-side bus was increased from 667 MHz to 800 MHz. On November 1, 2007, Apple added the option of a 2.6 GHz Santa Rosa platform Core 2 Duo CPU as well as reconfigured hard drive options.[12]

First-generation 17-inch MacBook Pro

On February 26, 2008, the MacBook Pro line was again updated.[13][14] LED backlighting was added as an option for the 17-inch model.[13] Processors were updated to "Penryn" cores, which are built on the 45 nanometer process (65 nanometer "Merom" cores were previously used), and hard drive and memory capacities were increased.[13] Multi-touch capabilities, first introduced with the MacBook Air earlier that year, were brought over to the MacBook Pro's trackpad.[13] At the time of the introduction of the 15-inch unibody MacBook Pro on October 14, 2008, the pre-unibody model with the same screen size was discontinued, while the 17-inch pre-unibody model continued to be sold.[15] The original case design was discontinued on January 6, 2009, when the 17-inch MacBook Pro was also updated with unibody construction.[16]

Reception[edit]

Some reviewers applauded the MacBook Pro, which was speedier than the PowerBook G4, with two- or threefold improvements in performance in some areas.[3] For example, the 3D rendering program Cinema 4D XL was 3.3 times faster[3] and the boot-up time was more than halved.[4] The MacBook Pro generally outperformed the PowerBook G4 in performance analyzer utility tests, XBench and Cinebench.[4] Reviewers lauded the screen's maximum brightness, 67 percent higher than the PowerBook G4; the excellent horizontal viewing angles; the matte options; and the bright, crisp, and true colors.[5] Although the screen offered fewer vertical pixels (1,440 × 900 in the MacBook Pro instead of 1,440 × 960 in the PowerBook), one reviewer called the screen "nothing less than stellar".[4] Reviewers praised the new MagSafe power adapter,[3] although one reviewer said it disconnected too easily in some instances.[4] They also praised the backlit keyboard, large trackpad, and the virtually silent operation of the machine.[3][5] The new laptop also offered better wireless performance.

One reviewer criticized the decision to underclock the ATI Mobility Radeon X1600 graphics card by about 30 percent its original speed.[5] The notebook was also noted for running hot.[3][5] Users complained that upgrading system memory was harder than in older Apple notebooks.[4] Since the dimensions for the 15-inch MacBook Pro were tweaked slightly from the 15-inch PowerBook G4, older accessories such as notebook sleeves did not work with the new models.[4] Some users noted a slight flickering when the screen was on lower brightness settings.[4] Battery life remained about the same three-plus hours as in previous models, on par with or better than the competition.[4] Apple increased the battery capacity by 10 Wh, going from 50 in the PowerBook G4 to 60,[4] but the more powerful Core Duo CPU required more power.[4]

Technical specifications[edit]

Table of models
Component Intel Core Duo Intel Core 2 Duo
Model Early 2006[6][7][17] Late 2006[10] Mid 2007[18] Late 2007[19] Early 2008[9] Late 2008
Release date(s) January 10, 2006 (15"),[1] April 24, 2006 (17")[2] October 24, 2006[8] June 5, 2007[12] November 1, 2007[20] February 26, 2008[13] October 14, 2008[21]
Model number(s) MA463*/A or MA464*/A; MA600* or MA601*; MA092*/A MA609*, MA610*, or MA611*/A MA895*, MA896*, or MA897* MA895*/A, MA896*/A, or MA897*/A MB133*/A, MB134*/A, or MB166*/A MB766*/A
Model Identifier(s) MacBookPro1,1, MacBookPro1,2 MacBookPro2,1, MacBookPro2,2 MacBookPro3,1 MacBookPro4,1 MacBookPro4,1 (re-listed)
Widescreen Display
(matte or glossy)[note 1]
15.4", LCD, 1,440 × 900 15.4", LCD, 1,440 × 900, with LED backlighting N/A
17", LCD, 1,680 × 1,050 17", LCD, 1,680 × 1,050
Optional 1,920 × 1,200
17", LCD, 1,680 × 1,050
Optional 1,920 × 1,200, with LED backlighting
17", LCD, 1,920 × 1,200, with LED backlighting
Processor 1.83 GHz (T2400), 2.0 GHz (T2500) or 2.16 GHz (T2600) Intel Core Duo Yonah with 2 MB on-chip L2 cache 2.16 GHz (T7400) or 2.33 GHz (T7600) Intel Core 2 Duo Merom with 4 MB on-chip L2 cache 2.2 GHz (T7500) or 2.4 GHz (T7700) Intel Core 2 Duo Merom with 4 MB on-chip L2 cache 2.2 GHz (T7500) or 2.4 GHz (T7700) Intel Core 2 Duo Merom with 4 MB on-chip L2 cache
Optional 2.6 GHz (T7800) with 4 MB on-chip L2 cache
2.4 GHz (T8300) Intel Core 2 Duo Penryn with 3 MB on-chip L2 cache, or 2.5 GHz (T9300) with 6 MB on-chip L2 cache
Optional 2.6 GHz (T9500) with 6 MB on-chip L2 cache
2.5 GHz (T9300) Intel Core 2 Duo Penryn with 6 MB on-chip L2 cache
Optional 2.6 GHz (T9500) with 6 MB on-chip L2 cache
Front-side bus 667 MHz 800 MHz
Memory
Two slots for PC2-5300 DDR2 SDRAM (667 MHz)
512 MB (two 256 MB) or 1 GB (two 512 MB)
Expandable to 2 GB[note 2]
1 GB (two 512 MB) or 2 GB (two 1 GB)
Expandable[note 2] to 4 GB, but only 3 GB addressable[22]
2 GB (two 1 GB)
Expandable[note 2] to 6 GB[note 3][23]
4 GB (two 2 GB)
Expandable[note 2] to 6 GB[note 3][23]
Graphics
with dual-link DVI
ATI Mobility Radeon X1600 with 128 MB or 256 MB of GDDR3 SDRAM Nvidia Geforce 8600M GT with 128 MB or 256 MB of GDDR3 SDRAM Nvidia Geforce 8600M GT with 256 MB, or 512 MB of GDDR3 SDRAM Nvidia Geforce 8600M GT with 512 MB of GDDR3 SDRAM[24]
Hard drive[note 4] 80 GB, 100 GB, or 120 GB serial ATA, 5,400-rpm
Optional 100 GB 7,200-rpm or 120 GB 5,400-rpm.
120 GB, 160 GB, or 200 GB serial ATA, 5,400-rpm
Optional 100 GB, 7,200-rpm.
120 GB or 160 GB serial ATA, 5,400-rpm
Optional 250 GB, 4,200-rpm or 160 GB, 7,200-rpm.
120 GB or 160 GB serial ATA, 5,400-rpm
Optional 250 GB, 5,400-rpm or 200 GB, 7,200-rpm.
200 GB or 250 GB serial ATA, 5,400-rpm
Optional 200 GB 7,200-rpm or 300 GB 4,200-rpm.
250 GB serial ATA, 5,400-rpm
Optional 320 GB, 7,200-rpm or 128 GB SSD.
Optical disc drive[note 5] Combo drive: 8× DVD read, 24× CD-R and 10× CD-RW recording

SuperDrive: 8× DVD-DL discs reads. DVD+/-R & RW recording. 24× CD-R and 10× CD-RW recording
(optional for 15-inch)
SuperDrive: 4× DVD+R writes, DVD+/-R read, 4× DVD+/-RW writes, 24× CD-R, and 10× CD-RW recording (17-inch)

SuperDrive: 2.4× DVD+R DL writes, DVD+/-R read, 4× DVD+/-RW writes, 24× CD-R, and 10× CD-RW recording or 4× DVD+R DL writes, DVD+/-R read/write, 4× DVD+/-RW writes, 24× CD-R, and 10× CD-RW recording SuperDrive: 4× DVD+R DL writes, DVD+/-R read/write, 4× DVD+/-RW writes, 24× CD-R, and 10× CD-RW recording SuperDrive: 4× DVD+R DL writes, 8× DVD+/-R read/write, DVD+RW writes, DVD-RW writes, 24× CD-R, and 16× CD-RW recording
AirPort Extreme Integrated 802.11a/b/g (AR5007 chipset) Integrated 802.11a/b/g and draft-n (n disabled by default)[note 6][25][26] (AR5008 chipset) Integrated 802.11a/b/g and draft-n (n enabled) (AR5008 or BCM4322 chipset, depending on revision)
Peripheral connections
2x USB 2.0 (15") or 3x USB 2.0 (17") 3x USB 2.0
1x FireWire 400 (15") or 1x FireWire 400 and 1x FireWire 800 (17") 1x FireWire 400 and 1x FireWire 800
ExpressCard/34, Gigabit Ethernet, DVI, Audio line in/out
Supported Operating System OS X 10.6 "Snow Leopard" OS X 10.7 "Lion" OS X 10.9 "Mavericks"
Battery (lithium-polymer, removable) 60 Wh (15") N/A
68 Wh (17")
Weight 5.6 lb (2.5 kg) (15") 5.4 lb (2.4 kg) (15") N/A
6.8 lb (3.1 kg) (17")
Dimensions 14.1 in (36 cm) wide × 9.6 in (24 cm) deep × 1.0 in (2.5 cm) (15") N/A
15.4 in (39 cm) wide × 10.4 in (26 cm) deep × 1.0 in (2.5 cm) (17")

Second generation (unibody)[edit]

Second generation 13-, 15-, and 17-inch MacBook Pro models

On October 14, 2008, in a press event at company headquarters, Apple officials announced a new 15-inch MacBook Pro featuring a "precision aluminum unibody enclosure" and tapered sides similar to those of the MacBook Air.[27][28] Designers shifted the MacBook Pro's ports to the left side of the case, and moved the optical disc drive slot from the front to the right side, similar to the MacBook. The new MacBook Pros had two new video cards: the Nvidia GeForce 9600M GT with either 256 or 512 MB of dedicated memory and a GeForce 9400M with 256 MB of shared system memory.[27] The FireWire 400 port was removed but the FireWire 800 port was retained, and the DVI port was replaced with a Mini DisplayPort receptacle.[27] The original unibody MacBook Pro came with a user-removable battery; Apple claimed five hours of use,[27] with one reviewer reporting results closer to four on a continuous video battery stress test.[29] Apple said that the battery would hold 80 percent of its charge after 300 recharges.[30][not in citation given][31][not in citation given]

Design[edit]

The unibody-construction MacBook Pro largely follows the styling of the original aluminum iMac and the MacBook Air and is slightly thinner than its predecessor, albeit wider and deeper due to the widescreen display.[27] The screen is high-gloss, covered by an edge-to-edge reflective glass finish, while an anti-glare matte option is available in the 15- and 17-inch models in which the glass panel is removed.[32] The trackpad has also been enlarged, giving more room for scrolling and multi-touch gestures.[32] When the line was updated in April 2010, inertial scrolling was added, making the scrolling experience much like that of the iPhone and iPad.[33][34][35] The entire touchpad is usable and acts as a clickable button.[32] The keys, still backlit, are now that of Apple's now-standard sunken keyboard with separated black keys.[33]

Updates[edit]

A size comparison of the unibody line of MacBook Pro laptops

During the MacWorld Expo keynote on January 6, 2009, Phil Schiller announced a 17-inch MacBook Pro with unibody construction. This version diverged from its 15-inch sibling with an anti-glare "matte" screen option (with the glossy finish standard) and a non user-removable lithium polymer battery.[36] Apple affirmed the battery's design was unlike any existing notebook battery. Instead of traditional round cells inside the casing, the lithium-ion polymer batteries are shaped and fitted into each laptop without wasting space. Adaptive charging extends battery life, which uses a chip to optimize the charge flow to reduce wear and tear.[36] Compared to the previous iteration, battery life for the 17" version is quoted at eight hours, with 80 percent of this charge remaining after 1,000 charge-discharge cycles. This battery is not intended to be user-removable.[36]

At Apple's Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC) on June 8, 2009, it was announced that the 13-inch unibody MacBook would be upgraded and re-branded as a MacBook Pro,[37] leaving only the white polycarbonate MacBook in the MacBook line.[38] It was also announced that the entire MacBook Pro line would use the non user-removable battery inherited from the 17-inch MacBook Pro.[39] The updated MacBook Pro 13- and the 15-inch would each have up to a claimed seven hours of battery life, while the 17-inch would keep its eight-hour capacity.[37][39] Some sources even reported up to eight hours of battery life for the 13- and 15-inch MacBook Pros during casual use,[40] while others reported around six hours.[32] Like the 17-inch MacBook Pro, Apple claims that they will last around 1,000 charge cycles while still containing 80 percent of their capacity.[41] Graphics card options stayed the same from the previous release, although the 13-inch,[42] and the base model 15-inch, came with only the GeForce 9400M GPU.[43] The screens were also improved, gaining a claimed 60 percent greater color gamut.[42][43] All of these mid 2009 models also included a FireWire 800 port and all except the 17-inch models would receive an SD card slot.[28] The 17-inch model would retain its ExpressCard/34 slot.[39] For the 13-inch MacBook Pro, the Kensington lock slot was moved to the right side of computer body.[44] In August 2009, Apple extended the "matte" anti-glare display option to the 15-inch MacBook Pro.[45]

On April 13, 2010, the MacBook Pro saw another update.[46] Intel Core i5 and Core i7 CPUs were introduced in the 15- and 17-inch models, while the 13-inch retained the Core 2 Duo with a speed increase.[46] The power brick was redesigned[33] and a high-resolution display (of 1,680 × 1,050) was announced as an option for the 15-inch models.[34] For video cards, the 13-inch gained an integrated Nvidia GeForce 320M graphics processing unit (GPU) with 256 MB of shared memory, while the 15- and 17-inch models were upgraded to the GeForce GT 330M, with either 256 or 512 MB of dedicated memory.[46] The 15" and 17" models also have an integrated Intel GPU that is built into the Core i5 and i7 processors.[46] The 15-inch model also gained 0.1 pounds (0.045 kg).[34] Save for a third USB 2.0 slot, all the ports on the 17-inch MacBook Pro are the same in type and number as on the 15-inch version.[47] All models come with 4 GB of system memory that is upgradeable to 8 GB across the board.[46] Battery life was also extended further in this update, to an estimated ten hours for the 13-inch and 8–9 hours on the 15- and 17-inch MacBook Pros.[46] This was achieved through greater power efficiency and adding more battery capacity.[46] Through stress test use, one reviewer reported nearer six hours for a continuous video battery stress test (in the 15-inch)[35] and another, who called the battery life "unbeatable", reported nearer eight (in the 13-inch) in their "highly demanding battery drain test".[33]

The line was updated on February 24, 2011 with the introduction of Intel Thunderbolt technology and dual core Intel Core i5 and i7 (on 13-inch model) or quad-core i7 (on 15- and 17-inch models) Sandy Bridge processors as well as a high definition FaceTime camera. Intel HD Graphics 3000 come integrated with the CPU, while the 15- and 17-inch models also utilize graphics cards from AMD, the Radeon HD 6490M and Radeon HD 6750M models. Later editions of these models following the release of OS X Lion also lacked a dashboard (F4) key, replacing the dashboard key with a launchpad key. The bottoms, which include the information, are also engraved differently from the 2010 models.[48] The 2011 models also debuted Intel's Thunderbolt serial bus platform that can achieve speeds of up to 10 Gbit/s,[49] which is up to twice as fast as the USB 3.0 specification, 20 times faster than the USB 2.0 specification, and up to 12 times faster than FireWire 800.[50] Apple says that it can be used to drive displays or to transfer large quantities of data in a short amount of time.[50]

On June 11, 2012, Apple showcased its upgraded Mac notebooks, OS X Mountain Lion, and iOS 6 at the Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC) in San Francisco.[51] The new MacBook Pro models were updated with Ivy Bridge processors and USB 3.0 ports, and the default RAM on premium models was increased to 8 GB.[52] Following this announcement, the 17" model was discontinued. After a media event on October 22, 2013 Apple discontinued all second generation MacBook Pros except for the entry 2.5 GHz 13" model.[53]

Reception[edit]

Some reviewers praised the new laptop's compact size for its performance,[29] the quality of the screen, and sturdy unibody build,[29] which allowed easier upgrading of internal components as compared to the original models.[29] Some reviewers also noted that the new MacBook Pro ran more quietly and at cooler temperatures.[29] However, others criticized the amount of heat generated by the new design.[54][55]

Reviewers lamented the loss of a matte screen option for the 2008 unibody MacBook Pro, noting the reflectiveness of the screen in sunlight, even when its brightness was turned all the way up.[29] CNET's Dan Ackerman commented of the mid-2009 models, "According to Apple, the new display offers a wider color gamut, and the screen certainly looks bright and colorful, but we wish the same matte-screen option offered on the 17-inch MacBook Pro was available across the line... While the LED screen means a thinner lid and some battery life benefits, the edge-to-edge glass covering the entire display panel grabs stray light rays with ease, making the glossy screen hard to see in some lighting conditions."[32] As of 2011, however, matte screens are offered for both the 15" and 17" models. Furthermore, the addition of Mini DisplayPort instead of the more popular HDMI was criticized.[29] The relatively low number of ports and lower end technical specifications when compared to similarly priced laptops from other brands were also frowned upon.[29]

Laptop Magazine's Michael Prospero praised the 2010 15-inch model's display, calling it "bright and crisp". He further commented, "While reflections from the glossy display weren't overwhelming, it's also nice to know there's an antiglare option—though only for the higher resolution display. Still, colors were bright, blacks were deep and dark, and viewing angles were excellent both vertically and horizontally." He also lauded the quality of the iSight webcam, the responsiveness of the touchpad, the microphone and speakers, as well as the performance of the new CPUs for the 15" model and the long battery life. Complaints included the price of the laptop, the low number of USB ports, and the lack of HDMI.[34]

CNET praised the automatic graphics switching features of the 15- and 17-inch 2010 models as well as the graphics cards themselves. Acclaim was also given to the Core i5 and i7 CPUs, the multi-touch trackpad, and the addition of audio capabilities to the Mini DisplayPort video output.[35] They also called for the addition of HDMI and the Blu-ray optical disc format, saying that most other computers in the MacBook Pro's price range possessed these features.[35] CNET also criticized the option of a higher resolution screen in the 15-inch model, saying "the higher-resolution screen should be included by default."[35]

Technical specifications[edit]

Discontinued Current
Table of models
Component Intel Core 2 Duo Intel Core 2 Duo, Core i5, Core i7 Intel Core i5, Core i7
Model[56] Late 2008 Early 2009 Mid 2009 Mid 2010 Early 2011 Late 2011 Mid 2012
Release date October 14, 2008[27] January 6, 2009 (17")[16]
March 3, 2009 (15")[57]
June 8, 2009[58] April 13, 2010[46] February 24, 2011[59] October 24, 2011[60] June 11, 2012[61][62]
Model number(s) MB470*/A or MB471*/A MB470*/A, MC026*/A or MB604*/A MB990*/A, MB991*/A, MC118*/A, MB985*/A, MB986*/A, or MC226*/A MC374*/A, MC375*/A, MC371*/A, MC372*/A, MC373*/A or MC024*/A MC700*/A, MC724*/A, MC721*/A, MC723*/A, or MC725*/A MD311*/A, MD313*/A, MD314*/A, MD318*/A or MD322*/A MD101*/A, MD102*/A, MD103*/A or MD104*/A
Model Identifier(s) MacBookPro5,1 (15") MacBookPro5,1 (15")
MacBookPro5,2 (17")
MacBookPro5,1 (15")
MacBookPro5,2 (17")
MacBookPro5,3 (15")
MacBookPro5,4 (15")
MacBookPro5,5 (13")
MacBookPro6,1 (17")
MacBookPro6,2 (15")
MacBookPro7,1 (13")
MacBookPro8,1 (13")
MacBookPro8,2 (15")
MacBookPro8,3 (17")
MacBookPro9,1 (15")
MacBookPro9,2 (13")
LED-backlit widescreen glossy display (16:10) N/A 13.3", 1,280 × 800
15.4", 1,440 × 900 15.4", 1,440 × 900
Optional matte screen
15.4", 1,440 × 900
Optional 1,680 × 1,050 (glossy or matte)
N/A 17", 1,920 × 1,200
Optional matte screen
N/A
Video camera iSight (480p) FaceTime HD (720p)
Processor N/A 2.26 GHz (P8400) or 2.53 GHz (P8700) Intel Core 2 Duo Penryn with 3 MB on-chip L2 cache 2.4 GHz (P8600) or 2.66 GHz (P8800) Intel Core 2 Duo Penryn with 3 MB on-chip L2 cache 2.3 GHz (2410M) Intel Core i5 Sandy Bridge with 3 MB on-chip L3 cache or 2.7 GHz (2620M) Intel Core i7 Sandy Bridge with 4 MB on-chip L3 cache 2.4 GHz (2435M) Intel Core i5 Sandy Bridge with 3 MB on-chip L3 cache or 2.8 GHz (2640M) Intel Core i7 Sandy Bridge with 4 MB on-chip L3 cache 2.5 GHz (3210M) Intel Core i5 Ivy Bridge with 3 MB on-chip L3 cache or 2.9 GHz (3520M) Intel Core i7 Ivy Bridge with 4 MB on-chip L3 cache
2.4 GHz (P8600) with 3 MB on-chip L2 cache or

2.53 GHz (T9400) Intel Core 2 Duo Penryn with 6 MB on-chip L2 cache
Optional 2.8 GHz (T9600) with 6 MB on-chip L2 cache

2.4 GHz (P8600) (15" only) with 3 MB on-chip L2 cache or
2.66 GHz (T9550) (15" and 17" only) Intel Core 2 Duo Penryn with 6 MB on-chip L2 cache
Optional 2.93 GHz (T9800) with 6 MB on-chip L2 cache (15" and 17" only)
2.53 GHz (P8700) or 2.66 GHz (P8800) (15" only) with 3 MB on-chip L2 cache or

2.8 GHz (T9600) (15" and 17" only) Intel Core 2 Duo Penryn with 6 MB on-chip L2 cache
Optional 3.06 GHz (T9900) with 6 MB on-chip L2 cache (15" and 17" only)

2.4 GHz (520M) (15" only) or 2.53 GHz (540M) (15" and 17" only) with 3 MB on-chip L3 cache or 2.66 GHz (620M) (15" and 17" only) Intel Core i7 Arrandale with 4 MB on-chip L3 cache
Optional 2.8 GHz (640M) with 4 MB on-chip L3 cache (15" and 17" only)
2.0 GHz quad-core (2635QM) (15" only) or 2.2 GHz quad-core (2720QM) (15" and 17" only) Intel Core i7 Sandy Bridge with 6 MB on-chip L3 cache
Optional 2.3 GHz (2820QM) with 8 MB on-chip L3 cache (15" and 17" only)
2.2 GHz quad-core (2675QM) (15" only) or 2.4 GHz quad-core (2760QM) (15" and 17" only) Intel Core i7 Sandy Bridge with 6 MB on-chip L3 cache
Optional 2.5 GHz (2860QM) with 8 MB on-chip L3 cache (15" and 17" only)
2.3 GHz quad-core (3615QM) (15" only) or 2.6 GHz quad-core (3720QM) (15" only) Intel Core i7 Ivy Bridge with 6 MB on-chip L3 cache
Optional 2.7 GHz (3820QM) with 8 MB on-chip L3 cache (15" only)
System bus N/A 1,066 MHz front side bus (13") Intel Direct Media Interface 5 GT/s
1,066 MHz front side bus (15" and 17") Intel Direct Media Interface
2.5 GT/s (15" and 17")
Memory
(Two slots)
2 GB (two 1 GB) or 4 GB (two 2 GB)
Expandable to 4 GB by default, expandable to 8 GB with the latest EFI update[63]
4 GB (two 2 GB)
Expandable to 8 GB.[note 2] 2.66 GHz and 2.93 GHz models expandable to 8 GB
2 GB (two 1 GB) or 4 GB (two 2 GB)
Expandable to 8 GB
4 GB (two 2 GB)
Expandable to 8 GB
16 GB on 13" models
4 GB (two 2 GB)
Expandable to 16 GB
4 GB (two 2 GB) or 8 GB (two 4 GB)
Expandable to 16 GB
1066 MHz PC3-8500 DDR3 SDRAM 1333 MHz PC3-10600 DDR3 SDRAM
Expandable to 16GB of 1600 MHz PC3-12800 DDR3 SDRAM (only models with i7 27xxQM or 28xxQM processor)[64][unreliable source?][65]
1600 MHz PC3-12800 DDR3 SDRAM
Graphics N/A Nvidia GeForce 9400M with 256 MB of DDR3 SDRAM shared with main memory (13" and some 15" models) Nvidia GeForce 320M with 256 MB of DDR3 SDRAM shared with main memory (13" models only) Intel HD Graphics 3000 with 384 MB (512 MB with 8 GB of RAM installed)[66] DDR3 SDRAM shared with main memory (13" models only) Intel HD Graphics 4000 with DDR3 SDRAM shared with main memory (13" models only)
Nvidia GeForce 9400M with 256 MB of DDR3 SDRAM shared with main memory and Nvidia GeForce 9600M GT with 256 MB or 512 MB of GDDR3 SDRAM
Can switch between the two (but cannot use both)
Nvidia GeForce 9400M with 256 MB of DDR3 SDRAM shared with main memory and Nvidia GeForce 9600M GT with 256 MB or 512 MB of GDDR3 SDRAM (some 15" or 17" models)
Can switch between the two (but cannot use both)
Intel HD Graphics with 256 MB of DDR3 SDRAM shared with main memory and Nvidia GeForce GT 330M with 256 MB or 512 MB of GDDR3 SDRAM (15" and 17" models)
Automatically switches between graphics hardware when running OS X
Intel HD Graphics 3000 with 384 MB DDR3 SDRAM shared with main memory (15" and 17" models) and AMD Radeon HD 6490M with 256 MB GDDR5 memory (15" models)
or AMD Radeon HD 6750M with 1 GB GDDR5 memory (15" and 17" models)
Automatically switches between graphics hardware when running OS X
Intel HD Graphics 3000 with 384 MB DDR3 SDRAM shared with main memory (15" and 17" models) and AMD Radeon HD 6750M with 512 MB GDDR5 memory (15" models)
or AMD Radeon HD 6770M with 1 GB GDDR5 memory (15" and 17" models)
Automatically switches between graphics hardware when running OS X
Intel HD Graphics 4000 with DDR3 SDRAM shared with main memory and Nvidia GeForce GT 650M with 512 MB GDDR5 memory (base 15" model) or 1 GB GDDR5 memory
Automatically switches between graphics hardware when running OS X
Secondary storage[note 4] 250 GB or 320 GB serial ATA at 5,400-rpm
Optional 250 GB or 320 GB at 7,200-rpm, 128 GB SSD
250 GB or 320 GB serial ATA at 5,400-rpm
Optional 250 GB or 320 GB at 7,200-rpm, 128 GB or 256 GB SSD
160 GB, 250 GB, 320 GB, or 500 GB serial ATA at 5,400-rpm
Optional 320 GB or 500 GB at 5,400-rpm or 7,200-rpm (15" and 17" only) or 128 GB or 256 GB SSD
250 GB, 320 GB, or 500 GB serial ATA at 5,400-rpm.
Optional 320 GB or 500 GB at 5,400-rpm or 7,200-rpm or 128 GB, 256 GB, or 512 GB SSD.
320 GB (13" only), 500 GB or 750 GB serial ATA at 5,400-rpm.
Optional 500 GB or 750 GB at 5,400-rpm or 500 GB at 7,200-rpm (15" and 17" only), or 128 GB, 256 GB, or 512 GB SSD
500 GB or 750 GB serial ATA at 5,400-rpm (13" and base 15" models) or 17" 750 GB serial ATA at 5,400-rpm (high-end 15" and 17" models)
Optional 750 GB at 5,400-rpm or 7,200-rpm (15" and 17" only), or 128 GB, 256 GB, or 512 GB SSD
500 GB or 750 GB serial ATA at 5,400-rpm Optional 750 GB at 5,400-rpm or 7,200-rpm or 1 TB at 5,400-rpm or 128 GB, 256 GB, 512 GB or 1 TB SSD
SATA 3 Gbit/s SATA 6 Gbit/s
Optical disc drive[note 5] SuperDrive: 4× DVD±R DL writes, DVD+/-R read/write, 8× DVD+RW writes, 6× DVD-RW writes, 24× CD-R, and 16× CD-RW recording
AirPort Extreme Integrated 802.11a/b/g/draft-n (n enabled) (BCM4322 2 × 2 chipset) Integrated 802.11a/b/g/n (BCM4331 3 × 3 chipset)
Peripheral connections ExpressCard/34 SDXC card slot (13" and 15") or ExpressCard/34 (17") SDXC card slot
2x USB 2.0 2x USB 2.0 (15") or 3x USB 2.0 (17") 2x USB 2.0 (13" and 15") or 3x USB 2.0 (17") 2x USB 3.0
Mini DisplayPort (without audio support) Mini DisplayPort (with audio support) Thunderbolt port
Gigabit Ethernet, Firewire 800, Audio line in/out
Battery (lithium polymer, non-removable except in original 15") N/A 58 Wh (13") 63.5 Wh (13")
50 Wh removable lithium-polymer (15") 73 Wh (15") 77.5 Wh (15")
N/A 95 Wh (17") N/A
Weight N/A 4.50 lb (2.04 kg) (13")
5.5 lb (2.5 kg) (15") 5.6 lb (2.5 kg) (15")
N/A 6.6 lb (3.0 kg) (17") N/A
Dimensions N/A 12.78 in (32.5 cm) wide × 8.94 in (22.7 cm) deep × 0.95 in (2.4 cm) high (13")
14.35 in (36.4 cm) wide × 9.82 in (24.9 cm) deep × 0.95 in (2.4 cm) high (15")
N/A 15.47 in (39.3 cm) wide × 10.51 in (26.7 cm) deep × 0.98 in (2.5 cm) high (17") N/A

Early 2011 model GPU Issues[edit]

Early 2011 models reportedly suffer from manufacturing problems leading to overheating, graphical issues, and eventually complete GPU and logic board failure. A thread was opened on the Apple Support community[67] that reached more than 8,000 posts and 1,200,000 visits (Sept 2014). Users started a petition requesting a recall over the issue, which quickly surpassed 15,000 signatures.[68] A similar but nonidentical issue affected iMac GPUs which were later recalled by Apple.[69] The problem was covered by many articles in Mac-focused magazines, starting late 2013 throughout 2014.[70][71][72][73][74] In August 2014 the law firm Whitfield Bryson & Mason LLP begun investigating the problem,[75] considering a class action against Apple. Apple, as of mid-September 2014, refuses to comment on the issue.

Third generation (Retina)[edit]

Third generation MacBook Pro 15-inch with Retina display
The third generation MacBook Pro, as seen below a MacBook Air, has a MagSafe 2 and two Thunderbolt ports.

On June 11, 2012, at the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC) in San Francisco Apple introduced a new third generation MacBook Pro, marketed as the "MacBook Pro with Retina display" to differentiate it from the updated models of the previous generation released the same day.[51] The new model includes Intel's third generation Core i7 processors (Ivy Bridge microarchitecture) along with USB 3.0 integrated, and a high-resolution 15.4" IPS 2880x1800-pixel Retina display.[52] Other new or changed features include a second Thunderbolt port, an HDMI port, and a new thinner MagSafe port, dubbed the 'MagSafe 2'.[76]

On October 23, 2012, Apple introduced in a keynote a new version of the third-generation MacBook Pro. This was a 13-inch version, very similar in specification to the 15-inch version but with slightly lower capabilities, such as less powerful processors and a 13-inch 2560x1600 pixel display, representing 227 pixels per inch.[77]

The new models omit Ethernet and FireWire 800 ports, though Apple offers Thunderbolt adapters for both interfaces.[78] They also omit a SuperDrive, making the 15-inch model Apple's first professional notebook since the PowerBook 2400c to ship without a built-in optical drive.[79] Instead of a hard disk drive the new models ship with a solid state drive standard in a proprietary flash module design rather than a 2.5" notebook drive. Apple also claims improved speakers and microphones and a new system for cooling the notebook with improved fans.[76]

The Retina models also have fewer user-accessible upgrade or replacement options than previous MacBooks. Unlike the previous generations, the memory is soldered onto the logic board and thus is not end-user upgradable. Because of this, the amount of memory can only be chosen at time of purchase. The solid state drive is not soldered, and can be replaced with a larger unit.[80] The battery is glued into place; attempts to remove it may destroy the battery and/or trackpad.[81] The entire case uses proprietary pentalobe screws and cannot be disassembled with standard tools. While the battery is glued in, recycling companies have stated that the design is only "mildly inconvenient" and does not hamper the recycling process.[82]

The Retina models do not have a Kensington lock slot, so alternative products are required to physically secure them.[83]

On February 13, 2013, Apple announced updated prices and processors for their MacBook Pro with Retina Display. The 13-inch MacBook Pro with Retina Display and 128 GB flash storage is the entry-level model, while the upgraded model with 256 GB of flash storage now comes with a 2.6 GHz processor. Apple also announced that the 15-inch MacBook Pro with Retina Display now has a 2.4 GHz processor. The top-line version of the 15-inch variant now comes with a 2.7 GHz quad-core processor and 16 GB of RAM.[84]

On October 22, 2013 Apple updated the line with Intel's Haswell processors and Iris Graphics, 802.11ac wi-fi, Thunderbolt 2, and PCIe-based flash storage. The lower-end 15-inch model now only includes integrated graphics while the higher-end model continues to include discrete Nvidia graphics in addition to integrated graphics.[85] Support for 4K video output via HDMI was added but this limits the number of external displays from three to two.[86] On July 29, 2014 Apple announced updated prices and processors for their Haswell Macbook Pro with Retina Display.[87]

Design[edit]

The Retina display MacBook Pros largely follow the styling of the previous generation with its aluminum enclosure and separated black keys. The most apparent body changes are a thinner chassis, and a display with a redesigned hinge and thinner bezel. The power button is now located on the keyboard rather than the upper right corner of the chassis.[88] At 0.71 inches (18 mm) thick the 15-inch model is 25 percent thinner than its predecessor. Unlike any previous Macintosh laptops the model name is not visible when the computer is in normal use as the model now has its name on the underside of the chassis rather than the screen bezel, where it had been located on all Macintosh laptops after the PowerBook 280c in 1995.[89][90]

Reception[edit]

The third generation MacBook Pro received positive reviews because of the Retina display, flash storage, and power. It was criticized, however, because of the price and lack of an ethernet port and optical drive. Roman Loyola of Macworld said that the Retina MacBook Pro was "groundbreaking" and made people "rethink how they use technology." He praised the inclusion of USB 3.0 and the slimmer body.[91] Dan Ackerman of CNET commented "I've previously called the 15-inch MacBook Pro one of the most universally useful all-around laptops you can buy. This new version adds to that with HDMI, faster ports, and more portability. But it also subtracts from that with its exclusion of an optical drive and Ethernet port, plus its very high starting price. The Pro and Retina Pro are clearly two laptops designed for two different users, and with the exception of all-day commuters who need something closer to a MacBook Air or ultrabook, one of the two branches of the MacBook Pro family tree is still probably the most universally useful laptop you can buy."[92]

The Retina Macbook line have no optical drives, requiring the use of external one. This is the official Apple external drive designed for these computers.

Joel Santo Domingo of PC Magazine gave the MacBook Pro an "Editor's Choice" rating. He praised “brilliant Retina display” the thin design, port selection and speedy storage, and highlighted the expansibility via Thunderbolt ports which support up to seven devices each.[93] David Pogue of The New York Times praised the 15-inch model's screen, keyboard, sound, start-up time, cosmetics, battery life, storage, and RAM capacity, however criticized the lack of a SuperDrive, pricing, and compatibility of the MagSafe 2 connector.[94]

Since the battery is glued in and cannot be easily disassembled for recycling (an EPEAT requirement), Apple received criticisms about the machine's ability to be recycled. Greenpeace spokesman Casey Harrell said Apple "has pitted design against the environment—and chosen design. They're making a big bet that people don't care, but recycling is a big issue."[95] Wired also criticized Apple's recyclability claims, stating "[t]he design may well be comprised of 'highly recyclable aluminum and glass'—but my friends in the electronics recycling industry tell me they have no way of recycling aluminum that has glass glued to it like Apple did with both this machine and the recent iPad."[96]

The Retina displays on the MacBook Pro have been criticized for "image retention," usually when they were manufactured by LG.[97][98]

Technical specifications[edit]

Discontinued Current
Table of models
Component Intel Core i5, Core i7
Model Mid 2012 Late 2012 Early 2013 Late 2013 Mid 2014
Release date June 11, 2012[61][62] October 23, 2012[77] February 13, 2013[84] October 22, 2013 July 29, 2014[87]
Model number(s) MC975*/A or MC976*/A MC975*/A or MC976*/A, MD212*/A or MD213*/A ME664*/A or ME665*/A or ME698*/A, ME662*/A or ME663*/A or ME697*/A ME864*/A or ME865*/A or ME866*/A, ME293*/A or ME294*/A MGX72*/A or MGX82*/A or MGX92*/A, MGXA2*/A or MGXC2*/A
Model Identifier(s) MacBookPro10,1 (15") MacBookPro10,1 (15")
MacBookPro10,2 (13")
MacBookPro11,1 (13")
MacBookPro11,2 (15")
MacBookPro11,3 (15")
LED-backlit widescreen glossy Retina display N/A 13.3", 2,560 × 1,600 (16:10)
15.4", 2,880 × 1,800 (16:10)
Video camera FaceTime HD (720p)
Processor N/A 2.5 GHz (i5-3210M) dual-core Intel Core i5 Ivy Bridge processor with 3 MB shared L3 cache

Optional 2.9 GHz (i7-3520M) dual-core Intel Core i7 Ivy Bridge processor with 4 MB shared L3 cache

2.6 GHz (i5-3230M) dual-core Intel Core i5 Ivy Bridge processor with 3 MB shared L3 cache

Optional 3.0 GHz (i7-3540M) dual-core Intel Core i7 Ivy Bridge with 4 MB shared L3 cache

2.4 GHz (i5-4258U) dual-core Intel Core i5 Haswell processor with 3 MB shared L3 cache

Optional 2.6 GHz (i5-4288U) dual-core Intel Core i5 Haswell with 3 MB shared L3 cache
Optional 2.8 GHz (i7-4558U) dual-core Intel Core i7 Haswell with 4 MB shared L3 cache

2.6 GHz (i5-4278U) dual-core Intel Core i5 Haswell processor with 3 MB shared L3 cache

Optional 2.8 GHz (i5-4308U) dual-core Intel Core i5 Haswell with 3 MB shared L3 cache
Optional 3.0 GHz (i7-4578U) dual-core Intel Core i7 Haswell with 4 MB shared L3 cache

2.3 GHz (i7-3615QM) quad-core Intel Core i7 Ivy Bridge with 6 MB on-chip L3 cache

Optional 2.6 GHz (i7-3720QM) with 6 MB on-chip L3 cache
Optional 2.7 GHz (i7-3820QM) with 8 MB on-chip L3 cache

2.4 GHz (i7-3630QM) quad-core Intel Core i7 Ivy Bridge with 6 MB on-chip L3 cache Optional 2.7 GHz (i7-3740QM) with 6 MB on-chip L3 cache
Optional 2.8 GHz (i7-3840QM) with 8 MB on-chip L3 cache
2.0 GHz (i7-4750HQ) quad-core Intel Core i7 Crystal Well with 6 MB on-chip L3 and 128 MB L4 cache
Optional 2.3 GHz (i7-4850HQ) with 6 MB on-chip L3 cache
Optional 2.6 GHz (i7-4960HQ) with 6 MB on-chip L3 cache
2.2 GHz (i7-4770HQ) quad-core Intel Core i7 Crystal Well with 6 MB on-chip L3 and 128 MB L4 cache
Optional 2.5 GHz (i7-4870HQ) with 6 MB on-chip L3 cache
Optional 2.8 GHz (i7-4980HQ) with 6 MB on-chip L3 cache
System bus Intel Direct Media Interface 5 GT/s
Memory N/A 8 GB built-in onboard RAM (not upgradeable) 4 GB built-in onboard RAM (not upgradeable) (13", 128 GB)
Optional 8 GB and 16 GB RAM configuration available at time of purchase only
8 GB built-in onboard RAM (not upgradeable) (13")
Optional 16 GB RAM configuration available at time of purchase only
8 GB built-in onboard RAM (not upgradeable) (13", 256 GB and 512 GB)
Optional 16 GB RAM configuration available at time of purchase only
8 GB built-in onboard RAM (not upgradeable) (15")
Optional 16 GB RAM configuration available at time of purchase only
8 GB built-in onboard RAM (not upgradeable) (15", 2.4 GHz)
Optional 16 GB RAM configuration available at time of purchase only
8 GB built-in onboard RAM (not upgradeable) (15", 2.0 GHz)
Optional 16 GB RAM configuration available at time of purchase only
16 GB built-in onboard RAM (15")
16 GB built-in onboard RAM (15", 2.7 GHz) 16 GB built-in onboard RAM (15", 2.3 GHz)
1600 MHz PC3-12800 DDR3L SDRAM
Graphics N/A Intel HD Graphics 4000 with DDR3L SDRAM shared with main memory (13") Intel Iris 5100 Graphics with DDR3L SDRAM shared with main memory (13")
Intel HD Graphics 4000 with DDR3L SDRAM shared with main memory and Nvidia GeForce GT 650M with 1 GB GDDR5 memory. (15")
Automatically switches between graphics hardware when running OS X
Intel Iris Pro 5200 Graphics with DDR3L SDRAM shared with main memory (15", 2.0 & 2.2 GHz)
Intel Iris Pro 5200 Graphics with DDR3L SDRAM shared with main memory and Nvidia GeForce GT 750M with 2 GB GDDR5 memory. (15", 2.3 & 2.5 GHz)
Automatically switches between graphics hardware when running OS X
Secondary storage[note 4] N/A 128 GB, 256 GB, 512 GB, or 768 GB SSD (13") 128 GB, 256 GB, 512 GB, or 768 GB SSD (13", 2.5 GHz) 128 GB or 256 GB (13", 2.4 GHz) 128 GB or 256 GB (13", 2.6 GHz)
256 GB, 512 GB, or 768 GB SSD (13", 2.6 GHz) 512 GB or 1 TB SSD (13", 2.6 GHz) 512 GB or 1 TB SSD (13", 2.8 GHz)
256 GB, 512 GB, or 768 GB SSD (15", 2.3 GHz) 256 GB, 512 GB, or 768 GB SSD (15", 2.4 GHz) 256 GB, 512 GB, or 1 TB SSD (15", 2.0 GHz) 256 GB, 512 GB, or 1 TB SSD (15", 2.2 GHz)
512 GB or 768 GB SSD (15", 2.6 GHz) 512 GB or 768 GB SSD (15", 2.7 GHz) 512 GB or 1 TB SSD (15", 2.3 GHz) 512 GB or 1 TB SSD (15", 2.5 GHz)
Mini-SATA 6 Gbit/s PCIe 2.0 x2 5.0 GT/s
AirPort Extreme Integrated 802.11a/b/g/n (2.4 & 5 GHz, up to 450 Mbit/s)
(BCM4331 3 × 3 chipset)
Integrated 802.11a/b/g/n/ac (2.4 & 5 GHz, up to 1.3 Gbit/s)
Peripheral connections SDXC card slot
2 USB 3.0
2 Thunderbolt ports 2 Thunderbolt 2 ports
HDMI port (up to 1920 by 1200)[99] HDMI port (up to 3840 by 2160 mirrored or 4096 by 2160)[86]
Audio line out (analog/optical)
Battery (lithium polymer, non-removable)
N/A 74 Wh (13") 71.8 Wh (13")
95 Wh (15")
Weight
N/A 3.57 lb (1.62 kg) (13") 3.46 lb (1.57 kg) (13")
4.46 lb (2.02 kg) (15")
Dimensions
N/A 12.35 in (31.4 cm) wide × 8.62 in (21.9 cm) deep × 0.75 in (1.9 cm) high (13") 12.35 in (31.4 cm) wide × 8.62 in (21.9 cm) deep × 0.71 in (1.8 cm) high (13")
14.13 in (35.9 cm) wide × 9.73 in (24.7 cm) deep × 0.71 in (1.8 cm) high (15")

Software and operating systems[edit]

The OS X operating system has been pre-installed on all MacBook Pros since release, starting with version 10.4.4 (Tiger).[1] Along with OS X, iLife has also shipped with all systems, beginning with iLife '06.[1]

The MacBook Pro comes with the successor to BIOS, Extensible Firmware Interface (EFI) 1.1. EFI handles booting differently from BIOS-based computers,[100] but provides backwards compatibility, allowing dual and triple boot configurations. In addition to OS X, the Microsoft Windows operating system is installable on Intel x86-based Apple computers. Officially, this is limited to both 32-bit and 64-bit versions of Windows XP, Vista, 7 and 8, with the necessary hardware drivers included with the Boot Camp software.[58][101] Other x86 operating systems such as Linux are also unofficially supported.[102] This is made possible by the presence of the Intel architecture as provided by the CPU and the BIOS emulation Apple has provided on top of EFI.[103][104]

As the MacBook Pro uses a different hardware platform than earlier PowerPC (PPC)-based Macintoshes, versions of OS X prior to Lion can run PPC applications only via the Rosetta emulator, which exacts some performance penalty, cannot emulate some lower-level PPC code, and does not support 64-bit (G5 specific) PPC features.[105] Rosetta is not present in Lion and later, so PPC applications cannot be run under those versions of OS X.[106]

Timeline of the MacBook family

iMac (Intel-based) MacBook Pro#Third generation (Retina) MacBook Pro#Third generation (Retina) MacBook Pro#Second generation (unibody) MacBook Pro#Second generation (unibody) MacBook Pro#Second generation (unibody) MacBook Pro#First generation MacBook Pro#First generation MacBook#Unibody aluminum model MacBook Pro#First generation MacBook#Unibody polycarbonate model MacBook#Original polycarbonate model MacBook#Original polycarbonate model MacBook Air MacBook Air


See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Through use of a second display, all pre-unibody MacBook Pros simultaneously support their native resolution on the internal display and a maximum of 2560 × 1600 on an external display.
  2. ^ a b c d e Existing memory modules may need to be replaced.
  3. ^ a b Some sources reference 6 GB functionality.
  4. ^ a b c Hard and solid-state drives listed are configurations available from Apple.
  5. ^ a b Quoted optical drive speeds are the maximum possible for each drive.
  6. ^ Wireless-N functionality requires installing the wireless-N enabler software included with the AirPort Extreme Wireless-N Router or sold as a download on the Apple online store, or by upgrading to OS X 10.5 "Leopard" or later.

References[edit]

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  28. ^ a b "Apple WWDC Keynote Address" (QuickTime Movie). Apple. Archived from the original on June 11, 2009. Retrieved June 10, 2009. 
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