Macon County, Georgia

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Macon County, Georgia
Macon County Courthouse.JPG
Map of Georgia highlighting Macon County
Location in the state of Georgia
Map of the United States highlighting Georgia
Georgia's location in the U.S.
Founded December 14, 1837
Named for Nathaniel Macon
Seat Oglethorpe
Largest city Oglethorpe
Area
 • Total 405.95 sq mi (1,051 km2)
 • Land 403.28 sq mi (1,044 km2)
 • Water 2.67 sq mi (7 km2), 0.66%
Population
 • (2010) 14,740
 • Density 35/sq mi (13/km²)
Congressional district 2nd
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4

Macon County is a county located in the U.S. state of Georgia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 14,740.[1] The county seat is Oglethorpe.[2][3]

The Macon County Courthouse is located in Oglethorpe, Georgia.

History[edit]

Macon County was created in 1837 from Houston ("house-ton") and Marion counties, effective December 14 of that year. The 91st county, it was named for the recently deceased General Nathaniel Macon of North Carolina, who served in the U.S. Congress for 37 years and ran for U.S. vice president. (The city of Macon, Georgia was also named for him, but is actually the seat of another county.) Parts of the county were used to create Taylor and Peach counties, in 1852 and 1924 respectively.

The first county seat was actually not chosen until 1838 when the county's inferior court selected Lanier. The Georgia General Assembly (state legislature) designated it so on December 29 of that year and incorporated it as a town. The Central of Georgia Railroad was then built through Oglethorpe in the 1850s, and the assembly called for a referendum on moving the seat to Oglethorpe in February of both 1854 and 1856. Little is known about the first vote, but the second resulted in the change to the new county seat the following year.

The infamous Andersonville National Cemetery is at the southwestern tip of the county. During the American Civil War, 13,000 died there from starvation and disease. [2] The county has seen an increase in tourists due to a song by The Mountain Goats. There is also an active Mennonite community within the county. The area code for Macon County is currently 478.

Geography[edit]

According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 405.95 square miles (1,051.4 km2), of which 403.28 square miles (1,044.5 km2) (or 99.34%) is land and 2.67 square miles (6.9 km2) (or 0.66%) is water.[4]

Major highways[edit]

State routes[edit]

Adjacent counties[edit]

National protected area[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1840 5,045
1850 7,052 39.8%
1860 8,449 19.8%
1870 11,458 35.6%
1880 11,675 1.9%
1890 13,183 12.9%
1900 14,093 6.9%
1910 15,016 6.5%
1920 17,667 17.7%
1930 16,643 −5.8%
1940 15,947 −4.2%
1950 14,213 −10.9%
1960 13,170 −7.3%
1970 12,933 −1.8%
1980 14,003 8.3%
1990 13,114 −6.3%
2000 14,074 7.3%
2010 14,740 4.7%
Est. 2012 14,263 −3.2%
U.S. Decennial Census[5]
2012 Estimate[6]

As of the census[7] of 2000, there were 14,074 people, 4,834 households, and 3,485 families residing in the county. The population density was 35 people per square mile (13/km²). There were 5,495 housing units at an average density of 14 per square mile (5/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 59.48% Black or African American, 37.37% White or Caucasian, 0.22% Native American, 0.60% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 1.52% from other races, and 0.75% from two or more races. 2.59% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 4,834 households out of which 34.50% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 42.70% were married couples living together, 24.40% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.90% were non-families. 25.20% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.40% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.71 and the average family size was 3.25.

In the county the population was spread out with 27.60% under the age of 18, 9.70% from 18 to 24, 27.60% from 25 to 44, 22.30% from 45 to 64, and 12.70% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 98.50 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.70 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $24,224, and the median income for a family was $29,402. Males had a median income of $26,922 versus $18,611 for females. The per capita income for the county was $11,820. About 22.10% of families and 25.80% of the population were below the poverty line, including 39.00% of those under age 18 and 22.60% of those age 65 or over.

Education[edit]

Cities and towns[edit]

Media[edit]

Macon County has been an important setting for season 4 of AMC's hit TV show, The Walking Dead. Macon County was a shooting place for the new 2013 movie, The Hunger Games: Catching Fire.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved February 16, 2014. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ [1]
  4. ^ "Census 2000 U.S. Gazetteer Files: Counties". United States Census. Retrieved 2011-02-13. 
  5. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". Census.gov. Retrieved July 22, 2013. 
  6. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". Census.gov. Retrieved July 22, 2013. 
  7. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 32°21′N 84°02′W / 32.35°N 84.04°W / 32.35; -84.04