Madang Airport

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Madang Airport
Madang (Flughafen).jpg
IATA: MAGICAO: AYMD
WMO: 94014
Summary
Airport type Public
Operator Papua New Guinea Office Of Civil Aviation
Location Madang
Coordinates 05°12′30″S 145°47′00″E / 5.20833°S 145.78333°E / -5.20833; 145.78333Coordinates: 05°12′30″S 145°47′00″E / 5.20833°S 145.78333°E / -5.20833; 145.78333
Map
AYMD is located in Papua New Guinea
AYMD
AYMD
Location of Madang Airport
Runways
Direction Length Surface
ft m
07/25 5,174 1,577 Asphalt
Source: World Aero Data [1]

Madang Airport (IATA: MAGICAO: AYMD), is an airport located in Madang, Papua New Guinea.

Airlines and destinations[edit]

Airlines Destinations
Air Niugini Port Moresby, Lae, Wewak
Airlines PNG Lae
Hevilift
Heli-Niugini

History[edit]

World War II[edit]

During World War II, occupied by the Imperial Japanese Army in January 1943, as a forward operating airfield for aircraft based at Wewak. Later expanded to a 3250' x 240' runway with a single taxiway with 31 revetment areas. Bombed by the allies during late 1943 and early 1944 the airfield became unserviceable.

Imperial Japanese Army Air Force Units at Madang[edit]

Imperial Japanese Army Air Force

  • 59th Sentai (Ki-43 Oscar)
  • 68th Sentai (Ki-61 Tony)
  • 248th Sentai (Ki-43-III Oscar)

Allied Liberation[edit]

Liberated by Australian Army forces on 24 April 1944. A large amount of high octane fuel was captured and used by the Australians for use in the Royal Australian Navy motor launch boats. The airfield was repaired and used by the Royal Australian Air Force until the end of the war.

Royal Australian Air Force Units at Madang[edit]

Accidents and incidents[edit]

  • On 11 April 1972, Douglas C-47 VH-PNB of Trans Australia Airlines overran the runway on landing, ending up in the sea damaged beyond economic repair.[1]
  • On 17 July 1972, Douglas C-47A VH-MAE of Ansett Airlines of Papua New Guinea was damaged beyond economic repair when the starboard undercarriage collapsed on landing. The aircraft was operating a domestic cargo flight from Wapenamanda Airport.[2]
  • On 30 October 1972, Douglas C-47B VH-PNA of Ansett Airlines of Papua New Guinea overran the runway on landing. The aircraft was subsequently withdrawn from use and used for fire practice, eventually being scrapped in 1978.[3]
  • On 31 May 1995 an Air Niugini Fokker F-28 Fellowship 1000, registration P2-ANB, attempted a landing in bad weather and aquaplaned off the runway and fell into a ditch at the eastern end of the runway. The aircraft was carrying 4 crew and 35 passengers, none of whom was injured.[4]
  • On 19 October 2013 an Air Niugini Avions de Transport Regional ATR-42-300 cargo plane, registration P2-PXY, made a failed takeoff attempt and fell into in Mero Creek at the western end of the runway. The right wing and engine were destroyed by fire but the three crew escaped to safety with minor injuries. There were no passengers on board.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "VH-PNB Accident description". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 5 September 2010. 
  2. ^ "VH-MAE Accident description". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 5 September 2010. 
  3. ^ "VH-PNA Accident description". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 7 September 2010. 
  4. ^ "ASN Aircraft accident Fokker F-28 Fellowship 1000 P2-ANB Madang Airport (MAG)". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 22 October 2013. 
  5. ^ "ASN Aircraft accident ATR-42-320F P2-PXY Madang Airport (MAG)". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 22 October 2013.