Madhav Das Nalapat

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Madhav Das Nalapat (M.D. Nalapat) is an Indian academic and columnist. Currently Editorial Director of The Sunday Guardian,[1] and Vice-Chair of Manipal University's Advanced Research Group, he has been the Coordinating Editor of the Times of India and editor of the Mathrubhumi.

Nalapat writes extensively on security, policy and international affairs.[2]

His columns are also published in the The Pakistan Observer[3] and Organiser,[4] the in-house publication / newspaper of the Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh.

Personal[edit]

He was born to K. Madhava Das and the renowned Indian English writer Kamala Surayya. Eldest of three brothers, Madhav is married to Lakshmi Bayi of the formerly Royal House of Travancore.[5]

Nalapat is a Gold Medalist in economics from the University of Mumbai.[citation needed]

Career[edit]

Nalapat became Editor of the Mathrubhumi, a Malayalam-language newspaper in 1984. Nalapat had earlier been Editorial Director of the Mathrubhumi Group of publications, and previous to that (from 1978), Executive Director of the newspaper company. He continued on the board of directors throughout his tenure in the company.[citation needed]

In 1989 he shifted from Malayalam to English-language journalism, becoming the resident editor of Times of India at Bangalore. In 1994 he moved to Delhi as resident editor of the Times of India. He also worked as Chief of News Bureau in 1995–1997, before becoming contributing editor in end-1998 to concentrate on writing.[citation needed]

The next year, he merged journalism with academics, becoming India's first professor of geopolitics at Manipal University and a distinguished fellow of the University of Georgia. In the past, he has served on the academic councils of Thiruvananthapuram,[clarification needed] Calicut and Bangalore universities.[citation needed]

He has contributed to leading publications throughout the world and has written six books, including INDUTVA whose central thesis is that every Indian is a synthesis of Vedic, Moghul and Western cultural DNA and religious exclusivism goes against such an ethos of fusion.[citation needed]

Apart from his work, he has played a key role in the literacy movement in Kerala, as the first honorary coordinator of the Kerala Association for Non-formal Education and Development. He was also the honorary secretary of the Kerala Children's Film Society, which screens educational films for children. He has also been active in environmental issues as honorary secretary of the Kerala Forestry Board, besides other NGOs. He has been active in actions designed to ensure that socially disadvantaged sections of Indian society were enabled to get better – if not equal – treatment, and has not diluted his secular vision of society, believing that the peoples of all faiths need to be given equal treatment in all lands[citation needed].

The inspiration of the Editor's character in the Malayalam movie 'Vartha' can be traced to him and his short but rather controversial career at Mathrubhumi.[citation needed]

Current affiliations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Sunday Guardian". 
  2. ^ Hearings (24 February 2005). "July 21–22, 2005 Written Testimony by M. D. Nalapat". Uscc.gov. Retrieved 3 November 2012. 
  3. ^ "The Pakistan Observer". 
  4. ^ "Organiser". 
  5. ^ "Travancore The Kulasekhara Dynasty Genealogy". Christopher Buyers. Retrieved 1 June 2013. 

External links[edit]