Madison Hubbell

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Madison Hubbell
2011 Skate America Madison HUBBELL Zachary DONOHUE.jpg
Hubbell and Donohue in 2011
Personal information
Country represented United States
Born (1991-02-24) February 24, 1991 (age 23)
Lansing, Michigan
Home town Okemos, Michigan
Residence Ann Arbor, Michigan
Height 5 ft 7 in (1.70 m)
Partner Zachary Donohue
Former partner Keiffer Hubbell, Nicholas Donahue
Coach Pasquale Camerlengo, Anjelika Krylova
Former coach Yaroslava Nechaeva, Yuri Chesnichenko
Choreographer Pasquale Camerlengo, Anjelika Krylova
Former choreographer Yaroslava Nechaeva, Yuri Chesnichenko
Skating club Detroit Skating Club
Former skating club Ann Arbor FSC
ISU personal best scores
Combined total 158.25
2014 Four Continents
Short dance: 61.05
2014 Four Continents
Free dance 97.20
2014 Four Continents

Madison L. Hubbell (born February 24, 1991) is an American ice dancer. With Zachary Donohue, she is the 2014 Four Continents champion, a two-time Nebelhorn Trophy champion (2011, 2013), and the 2012 U.S. national bronze medalist.

She competed with her brother Keiffer Hubbell from 2001 to 2011. They are the 2010 Four Continents bronze medalists, 2006 JGP Final champions, and two-time (2009, 2011) U.S. national pewter medalists.

Personal life[edit]

Madison Hubbell was born in Lansing, Michigan. She graduated from Laurel Springs High School in 2009 and entered Owens Community College in the fall of 2009.

Career[edit]

The Hubbells during their Josh Groban exhibition at the 2008–2009 Junior Grand Prix Final

Madison Hubbell started skating at age 5. She started ice dancing at age eight, skating with first partner Nicholas Donahue for one year.[1]

Early career with Keiffer Hubbell[edit]

Madison Hubbell teamed up with her brother, Keiffer Hubbell, in early 2001.[1] They originally represented the Lansing Skating Club in competition.

In the 2001–2002 season, Madison and Keiffer Hubbell competed for the first time on the Juvenile level, which is the lowest competition level in the U.S. Figure Skating structure. They competed at the Eastern Great Lakes Regional Championships, the qualifying competition for the U.S. Junior Championships. They placed second in the first compulsory dance, and then won the other two compulsory dances and the free dance to win the Juvenile event.[2] This win qualified them for the 2002 U.S. Junior Championships, where they placed 9th in the first compulsory dance, 6th in the second, and 7th in the free dance to place 7th overall.[3]

In the 2002–2003 season, the Hubbells remained on the Juvenile level. At the Eastern Great Lakes Regional Championships, they won all three segments of the competition to win the gold medal.[4] This win qualified them for the 2003 U.S. Junior Championships, where they won the first compulsory dance, placed second in the second compulsory dance, and won the free dance to win the gold medal overall.[5]

The Hubbells moved up to the Intermediate level in the 2003–2004 season and began represented the Ann Arbor Figure Skating Club in competition. At the Eastern Great Lakes Regional Championships, they won all three segments of the competition to win the gold medal.[6] This win qualified them for the 2004 U.S. Junior Championships, where they placed second in the first compulsory dance and then won both the second compulsory dance and the free dance to win the gold medal overall.[7] This was their second consecutive national title.

In the 2004–2005 season, the Hubbells moved up to the Novice level, which is the first level that competes at the U.S. Championships. At the Eastern Great Lakes Regional Championships, the first qualifying competition for the national championships, the Hubbells won all three segments of the competition, winning the competition ahead of training mates Emily Samuelson / Evan Bates.[8] This win qualified them for the Midwestern Sectional Championships, the final qualifying competition for the national championships. At the sectional championships, the Hubbells won both compulsory dances and then placed second in the free skate to win the silver medal behind Samuelson / Bates.[9] This win qualified them to the 2005 U.S. Championship. At the national championships, the Hubbells placed second in the first compulsory dance, then placed sixth in both the second compulsory dance and the free dance segments to place 5th overall.[10] Following the event, the Hubbells were assigned to the Estonia International Dance Competition.[11] At that spring competition, which was their first major international event,[12] the Hubbells won all three segments of the competition and won the gold medal.[13] This medal qualified the Hubbells for the USFSA Reserve team for the following season.

The Hubbells remained on the Novice level for the 2005–2006 season. At the Eastern Great Lakes Regional Championships, they won all three segments of the competition to win the gold medal.[14] This win qualified them for the Midwestern Sectional Championships, where they competed under the ISU Judging System for the first time. They won all three segments of the competition to win the gold medal by a margin of victory of 8.88 points ahead of silver medalists Piper Gilles / Timothy McKernan.[15] This win qualified them for the 2006 U.S. Championships. At the national championships, the Hubbells tied with fellow sibling team Cathy Reed / Chris Reed in the first compulsory dance with a score of 19.23.[16] The tie was broken by the technical elements mark and so the Hubbells won that segment of the competition.[17] The Hubbells won the second compulsory dance by a margin of 0.29 points ahead of the Reeds.[18] The Hubbells lost the free dance to the Reeds by 1.68 points.[19] The Hubbells placed second overall, winning the silver medal and placed second overall by a margin of 1.39 points behind the Reeds and 6.22 points ahead of bronze medalists Samantha Tomarchio / Nicholas Sinchak.[20]

Junior and senior career with Keiffer Hubbell[edit]

The Hubbells moved up to the Junior level both nationally and internationally in the 2006–2007 season. They made their ISU Junior Grand Prix debut on the 2006–2007 ISU Junior Grand Prix circuit. At their first event, the event in Courchevel, France, the Hubbells placed second in the compulsory and original dances and then won the free dance. They won the silver medal behind Ekaterina Bobrova / Dmitri Soloviev by a margin of 0.78 points.[21] The Hubbells were then assigned to their second event, the event in The Hague, Netherlands. They placed third in the compulsory dance segment and then won both the original and free dances to win the gold medal overall by a margin of victory of 1.84 points ahead of silver medalists Grethe Grünberg / Kristian Rand.[22] These two placements combined qualified them for the 2006–2007 ISU Junior Grand Prix Final, for which the Hubbells were the third-ranked qualifiers.[23] Qualifying for the event had also given them a bye to the U.S. Championships.

At the Junior Grand Prix Final, the Hubbells placed second in the Midnight Blues compulsory dance by a margin of 0.17 points behind Bobrova / Soloviev.[24] They won both the original and free dances to win the gold medal overall by a margin of victory of 2.17 points ahead of silver medalists and training mates Emily Samuelson / Evan Bates.[25]

At the 2007 U.S. Championships, the Hubbells placed second in both compulsory dances behind Samuelson / Bates. They won the original dance and went into the free dance in first place overall,[26] where they placed second. They won the silver medal overall, placing second by a margin of 0.17 points behind champions Samuelson / Bates, and 24.56 points ahead of bronze medalists and training-mates Lynn Kriengkrairut / Logan Giulietti-Schmitt.[27] The top three junior dance teams were named to the 2007 Junior Worlds,[28] and all three junior teams were coached by Yaroslava Nechaeva and Yuri Chesnichenko.[29]

At the 2007 Junior Worlds, the Hubbells both fell in the Silver Samba compulsory dance[30] and placed 12th in that segment of the competition.[31] They placed 5th in the original dance and 4th in the free dance to move up to place 6th overall.[32]

The Hubbells remained on the Junior level for the 2007–2008 season. Originally scheduled to compete on the 2007–2008 ISU Junior Grand Prix series, the Hubbells withdrew from their events and missed the fall season due to an injury to Keiffer. They began their competitive season at the Midwestern Sectional Championships, where they won all three segments of the competition to qualify for the 2008 U.S. Championships. At the national championships, the Hubbells won the compulsory dance, placed third in the original dance, and then won the free dance to win the gold medal overall. This win qualified them for the 2008 Junior Worlds. At the World Junior Championships, the Hubbells placed 5th in all three segments of the competition and 5th overall.[33]

In the 2008–2009 season, the Hubbells moved up to the senior level nationally and remained juniors internationally. They competed on the 2008–2009 ISU Junior Grand Prix. At their first event in Mexico City, Mexico, they won all three segments of the competition to win the gold medal by a margin of victory of 17.26 points ahead of silver medalists Kharis Ralph / Asher Hill.[34] The Hubbells were then assigned to their second event, the event in Cape Town, South Africa, where they again won all three segments of the competition to win the gold medal by a margin of victory of 9.25 points ahead of silver medalists Piper Gilles / Zachary Donohue.[35] These two placements combined qualified them for the 2008–2009 ISU Junior Grand Prix Final, for which the Hubbells were the top-ranked qualifiers.[36] Qualifying for the Junior Grand Prix Final also gave them a bye to the U.S. Championships.

The Junior Grand Prix Final was being held for the first time concurrently with the Grand Prix Final and so therefore did not include a compulsory dance segment. The Hubbells fell during the original dance and placed 6th in that segment of the competition.[37] They placed second in the free skate[38] and won the silver medal overall, placing 6.47 points behind champions Madison Chock / Greg Zuerlein.[39]

The Hubbells made their senior national debut at the 2009 U.S. Championships. They placed fourth in the compulsory dance,[40] the original dance,[41] and the free dance,[42] to place fourth overall and win the pewter medal.[43] They were named to the team for the 2009 Junior Worlds for the third consecutive year.[44]

At the 2009 World Junior Championships, the Hubbells placed 2nd in the compulsory dance, 3rd in the original dance, and 4th in the free skate to place 4th overall, placing 0.46 points behind bronze medalists Ekaterina Riazanova / Jonathan Guerreiro.[45]

Following the 2009 Trophée Eric Bompard competition, the Hubbells moved from Yaroslava Nechaeva and Yuri Chesnichenko – who coached them in Ann Arbor, Michigan for 10 years – to Pasquale Camerlengo and Anjelika Krylova in Detroit, Michigan.[46]

On May 12, 2011, the Hubbells announced the end of their partnership.[47] Her brother had experienced hip and back problems and was undecided about his future.[48]

Partnership with Zachary Donohue[edit]

On May 12, 2011, it was announced that Madison Hubbell would continue her ice dancing career with Zachary Donohue.[47] The team trains at the Detroit Skating Club under the guidance of the coaching team of Pasquale Camerlengo, Anjelika Krylova, Massimo Scali, Natalia Annenko-Deller, and Elizabeth Punsalan, with assistance on elements from Jason Dungjen.[48] They made their international debut at the 2011 Nebelhorn Trophy where they won the gold medal.[49][50] They finished 10th at the 2012 World Championships.

In 2013–14, Hubbell/Donohue won gold at the 2013 Nebelhorn Trophy, placed fourth at the 2013 Skate America, and won their first Grand Prix medal, bronze, at the 2013 Skate Canada International. After placing fourth at the 2014 U.S. Championships, they were assigned to the 2014 Four Continents Championships and finished ahead of Piper Gilles / Paul Poirier to take the gold medal. Hubbell/Donohue were first alternates for the 2014 World Championships but were unable to take the slot made available when Davis/White withdrew — Hubbell had sustained a torn labrum in her left hip, requiring surgery.[51]

Programs[edit]

With Zachary Donohue[edit]

Hubbell and Donohue at the 2011 Skate America
Season Short dance Free dance Exhibition
2013–2014
[52][53]
  • Nocturne Into Bohemian Rhapsody
    by Lucia Micarelli
2012–2013
[54][55][53]
Titanic:
  • Waltz
  • John Ryan's Polka
2011–2012
[56][53]
  • Latin medley
  • Make You Feel My Love
    by Adele

With Keiffer Hubbell[edit]

Season Short dance Free dance Exhibition
2010–2011
[57][58]
Original dance
2009–2010
[59][58]
Ukrainian folk dance:
  • Bukovinski Dance
  • Dibro Vchanka
    by Suzirya Ensemble
2008–2009
[60][58]
2007–2008
[61][58]
Folklore from the Alps:
  • Schuhplattler
  • Hope
    by Apocalyptica
2006–2007
[62][58]
  • Tango
2005–2006
[58]
  • Modern Tango
2004–2005
[58]
2003–2004
[58]
2002–2003
[58]

Competitive highlights[edit]

With Zachary Donohue[edit]

International[63]
Event 2011–12 2012–13 2013–14 2014–15
Worlds 10th
Four Continents 5th 1st
GP Bompard 4th TBD
GP Skate America 6th 4th
GP Skate Canada 5th 3rd TBD
Finlandia Trophy 3rd
Nebelhorn Trophy 1st 1st
National[53]
U.S. Champ. 3rd 4th 4th
Midwestern Sect. 1st
GP = Grand Prix; TBD = Assigned

With Keiffer Hubbell[edit]

The Hubbells (left) during the medals ceremony at the 2008 JGP Final.
International[64]
Event 2004–05 2005–06 2006–07 2007–08 2008–09 2009–10 2010–11
Four Continents 3rd
GP Bompard 8th
GP Cup of China 6th
GP Cup of Russia WD
GP Skate Canada 6th
Finlandia 8th 4th
International: Junior[64]
Junior Worlds 6th 5th 4th
JGP Final 1st 2nd
JGP France 2nd
JGP Mexico 1st
JGP Netherlands 1st
JGP South Africa 1st
Estonian IDI 1st N.
National[58]
U.S. Champ. 5th N. 2nd N. 2nd J. 1st J. 4th 6th 4th
Midwest. Sect. 2nd N. 1st N. 1st J.
EGL Regionals 1st N. 1st N.
GP = Grand Prix; JGP = Junior Grand Prix; WD = Withdrew
Levels: N. = Novice; J. = Junior
IDI = Ice Dance Invitational; EGL = Eastern Great Lakes

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Mittan, Barry (February 18, 2007). "Duos Dazzling Dance Debut". SkateToday. 
  2. ^ "2002 Eastern Great Lakes Regional Championships Juvenile Dance Final Standings". U.S. Figure Skating. 
  3. ^ "2002 U.S. Junior Figure Skating Championships Juvenile Dance Final Standings". U.S. Figure Skating. 
  4. ^ "2003 Eastern Great Lakes Regional Figure Skating Championships Juvenile Dance Final Standings". U.S. Figure Skating. 
  5. ^ "2003 U.S. Junior Figure Skating Championships JUVENILE DANCE Final Standings". U.S. Figure Skating. 
  6. ^ "2004 Eastern Great Lakes Regional Championships Intermediate Dance Final Standings". U.S. Figure Skating. 
  7. ^ "2004 U.S. Junior Figure Skating Championships Intermediate Dance Final Standings". U.S. Figure Skating. 
  8. ^ "2005 Eastern Great Lakes Regional Championships Novice Dance Final Standings". U.S. Figure Skating. 
  9. ^ "2005 Midwestern Sectional Championships Novice Dance Final Standings". U.S. Figure Skating. 
  10. ^ "2005 State Farm US Figure Skating Championships Novice Dance Final Standings". U.S. Figure Skating. 
  11. ^ "International Teams Named For Upcoming Championships". U.S. Figure Skating. 2005-01-21. 
  12. ^ "U.S. Athletes Overseas for Two International Competitions". U.S. Figure Skating. 2005-03-31. 
  13. ^ "2005 Estonia International Dance Competition Novice Dance Final Result". U.S. Figure Skating. 
  14. ^ "2006 Eastern Great Lakes Figure Skating Championships Novice Dance Final Standings". U.S. Figure Skating. 
  15. ^ "2006 Midwestern Sectional Championships Novice Dance Result". U.S. Figure Skating. 
  16. ^ "2006 State Farm U.S. Figure Skating Championships Novice Dance – Compulsory Dance 1 Result Details". U.S. Figure Skating. 
  17. ^ Backman, Daphne (2005-01-08). "Two Pairs of Siblings on Top in Novice Ice Dancing". U.S. Figure Skating. 
  18. ^ "2006 State Farm U.S. Figure Skating Championships Novice Dance – Compulsory Dance 2 Result Details". U.S. Figure Skating. 
  19. ^ "2006 State Farm U.S. Figure Skating Championships Novice Dance – Free Dance Result Details". U.S. Figure Skating. 
  20. ^ "2006 State Farm U.S. Figure Skating Championships Novice Dance Result". U.S. Figure Skating. 
  21. ^ "ISU Junior Grand Prix Courchevel – Ice Dancing". International Skating Union. 
  22. ^ "ISU Junior Grand Prix The Hague – Ice Dancing Ice Dancing Result". International Skating Union. 
  23. ^ "Junior Grand Prix of Figure Skating 2006 / 2007 FINAL RESULT Junior Ice Dancing". International Skating Union. 
  24. ^ "ISU Junior Grand Prix Final 2006/2007 – Junior Ice Dancing – Compulsory Dance Midnight Blues Result Details". International Skating Union. 
  25. ^ "ISU Junior Grand Prix Final 2006/2007 – Junior Ice Dancing Result". International Skating Union. 
  26. ^ Backman, Daphne (2007-01-23). "Hubbells Tango To the Junior Dance Lead". U.S. Figure Skating. 
  27. ^ "2007 State Farm U.S. Figure Skating Championships Junior Dance Final Result". U.S. Figure Skating. 
  28. ^ "International Team Selections". U.S. Figure Skating. 2007-01-28. 
  29. ^ Walker, Elvin (September 3, 2007). "Netchaeva and Tchesnitchenko Cultivate a Dynasty of Their Own". Golden Skate. 
  30. ^ Zanca, Salvatore (2007-02-27). "McLaughlin and Brubaker Lead after Short Program at World Junior Championships". U.S. Figure Skating. 
  31. ^ "ISU World Junior Figure Skating Championships – Junior Ice Dancing Compulsory Dance Silver Samba Result Details". International Skating Union. 
  32. ^ "2007 ISU World Junior Figure Skating Championships – Junior Ice Dancing Result". International Skating Union. 
  33. ^ "2008 ISU World Junior Figure Skating Championships – Junior Ice Dancing Result". International Skating Union. 
  34. ^ "ISU JGP Mexico Cup – Junior Ice Dance Result". International Skating Union. 
  35. ^ "ISU JGP Skate Safari – Junior Ice Dance Result". International Skating Union. 
  36. ^ "ISU Junior Grand Prix of Figure Skating 2008/2009 Junior Ice Dance FINAL RESULTS". International Skating Union. 
  37. ^ "SBS ISU Grand Prix and Junior Grand Prix Final – Junior Ice Dance – Original Dance Result Details". International Skating Union. 
  38. ^ "SBS ISU Grand Prix and Junior Grand Prix Final – Junior Ice Dance". International Skating Union. 
  39. ^ "SBS ISU Grand Prix and Junior Grand Prix Final – Junior Ice Dance Result". International Skating Union. 
  40. ^ "2009 U.S. FIGURE SKATING CHAMPIONSHIPS Championship Dance Compulsory Dance Final Result Details". U.S. Figure Skating. 
  41. ^ "2009 U.S. FIGURE SKATING CHAMPIONSHIPS Championship Dance Original Dance Final Result Details". U.S. Figure Skating. 
  42. ^ "2009 U.S. FIGURE SKATING CHAMPIONSHIPS Championship Dance Free Dance Final Result Details". U.S. Figure Skating. 
  43. ^ "2009 U.S. FIGURE SKATING CHAMPIONSHIPS Championship Dance Final Results". U.S. Figure Skating. 
  44. ^ "U.S. Figure Skating Announces World, Four Continents and World Junior Teams". U.S. Figure Skating. 2009-01-25. 
  45. ^ "ISU World Junior Figure Skating Championships 2009 – Junior Ice Dance Result". International Skating Union. 
  46. ^ "Ice Dancers Madison Hubbell and Keiffer Hubbell Announce Coaching Change". U.S. Figure Skating. November 2, 2009. 
  47. ^ a b "Madison Hubbell and Keiffer Hubbell Announce End of Partnership". U.S. Figure Skating. May 12, 2011. Retrieved June 3, 2011. 
  48. ^ a b Rutherford, Lynn (July 27, 2011). "Hubbell, Donohue hope to put a spell on judges". icenetwork. Retrieved July 27, 2011. 
  49. ^ Flade, Tatjana (September 22, 2011). "Zhiganshina and Gazsi dance to lead at Nebelhorn". GoldenSkate. Retrieved September 22, 2011. 
  50. ^ Flade, Tatjana (September 24, 2011). "Hubbell and Donohue capture gold at Nebelhorn Trophy". GoldenSkate. Retrieved September 24, 2011. 
  51. ^ "Davis and White Elect Not to Compete at 2014 World Championships". U.S. Figure Skating. 3 March 2014. 
  52. ^ "Madison HUBBELL / Zachary DONOHUE: 2013/2014". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on February 22, 2014. 
  53. ^ a b c d "Madison Hubbell / Zach Donohue". IceNetwork. 
  54. ^ "Madison HUBBELL / Zachary DONOHUE: 2012/2013". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on July 5, 2013. 
  55. ^ Berlot, Jean-Christophe (November 15, 2012). "Hubbell, Donohue emphasize passion over points". IceNetwork. 
  56. ^ "Madison HUBBELL / Zachary DONOHUE: 2011/2012". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on April 19, 2012. 
  57. ^ "Madison HUBBELL / Keiffer HUBBELL: 2010/2011". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on April 19, 2012. 
  58. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Madison Hubbell / Keiffer Hubbell". IceNetwork. Archived from the original on July 13, 2011. 
  59. ^ "Madison HUBBELL / Keiffer HUBBELL: 2009/2010". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on May 29, 2010. 
  60. ^ "Madison HUBBELL / Keiffer HUBBELL: 2008/2009". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on May 31, 2009. 
  61. ^ "Madison HUBBELL / Keiffer HUBBELL: 2007/2008". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on May 14, 2008. 
  62. ^ "Madison HUBBELL / Keiffer HUBBELL: 2006/2007". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on August 11, 2007. 
  63. ^ "Competition Results: Madison HUBBELL / Zachary DONOHUE". International Skating Union. 
  64. ^ a b "Competition Results: Madison HUBBELL / Keiffer HUBBELL". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on October 13, 2012. 

External links[edit]