Maggie McIntosh

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Margaret L. McIntosh
Maggie McIntosh (2008).jpg
Member of the Maryland House of Delegates
from the 43rd district
Incumbent
Assumed office
January 6, 2003
Preceded by (new district)
Maryland House of Delegates
42nd District
In office
November 10, 1992 – January 5, 2003
Preceded by Anne Perkins
Personal details
Born (1947-12-22) December 22, 1947 (age 66)
Quinter, Kansas
Political party Democratic
Website delmaggie.com

Margaret L. McIntosh (born December 22, 1947) is an American politician from the state of Maryland. The Chairman of the Environmental Matters Committee of the Maryland House of Delegates, she has been a member of the House of Delegates since November 1992.[1] She is a former Baltimore City Public School teacher who now chairs one of the six standing committees of the Maryland House of Delegates.[2] A Democrat, she represents the state's 43rd district in Baltimore City.

Early life and career[edit]

McIntosh received her Bachelor’s Degree in arts education from Wichita State University in 1970 and her Master of Science degree from the Johns Hopkins University in 1987. An educator, she taught art in the Baltimore City Public Schools from 1972 to 1978, before becoming an adjunct instructor of continuing education at Catonsville Community College (now known as the Catonsville campus of the Community College of Baltimore County). She would later spend nine years working for the City of Baltimore at the Commission on Aging and Retirement Education, serving from 1985 to 1988 as the Director of Pre-Retirement Education. During that time, she was heavily involved in Democratic campaigns, including those of Michael Dukakis and Barbara Mikulski.[3] She was elected as a delegate to both the 1980 and 2008 Democratic National Conventions, the latter as a delegate pledged to Hillary Clinton.

Legislative career[edit]

Maggie McIntosh was appointed to fill a vacancy in the House of Delegates in November 1992, when Delegate Anne Perkins accepted a teaching position in China. Two years later she was elected to a full term representing the 42nd District of Baltimore City and parts of Baltimore County. She has been re-elected in 1998, 2002, 2006 and 2010, but had to run in a substantially different district after the post-2000 round of redistricting; the 43rd, which she now represents, contains only 10% of the voters from her previous district, the 42nd. Nevertheless, in 2002, she placed first in a Democratic primary election in her new district which included five serving or former delegates vying for three seats.

In the Legislature[edit]

In the House of Delegates, McIntosh first served on the Appropriations Committee. She chaired the Subcommittee on Personnel and was a member of the Education and Economic Development and Capitol Subcommittees. In 1998, McIntosh assumed the position of Vice Chairman of the Commerce and Government Matters Committee. In 2001, she was named House Majority Leader after a previous stint as Deputy Majority Whip (1995–98). She remains the only woman in Maryland history to serve as majority leader. In January 2003, McIntosh was named chairman of the House Environmental Matters Committee, which handles legislation regarding not just the environment, natural resources, and agriculture, but also transportation, housing, and local government.

McIntosh during floor debate in 2009

Legislative Notes and Accomplishments[edit]

  • Voted 2nd (after Speaker Michael E. Busch) in The Maryland Gazette of Politics and Business's list of most influential Maryland state delegates for 2010[4]
  • Inducted into Daily Record (Maryland)'s Circle of Excellence after being named to Top 100 Women in Maryland list in 1998, 2000, and 2010[5]
  • Elected Vice-Chair of The Chesapeake Bay Commission (2012 - )
  • Sponsor of 2012 Bottle Deposit bill
  • Co-Sponsor of Death Penalty Repeal legislation
  • Co-sponsor of Marriage Equality legislation
  • Lead Sponsor, Chesapeake Conservation Corp Program[6]
  • Lead Sponsor, Ground Rent Registration and Reform[7]
  • Co-sponsored HB 860 (Baltimore City Public Schools Construction and Revitalization Act of 2013). Signed by the Governor on May 16, 2013, the new law approved 1.1 billion dollars to construct new schools in Baltimore City.[8]

Past election results[edit]

  • 2010 Race for Maryland House of Delegates – 43rd District[9]
Voters to choose three:
Name Votes Percent Outcome
Curt Anderson, Democratic 24,831   35.1%    Won
Maggie McIntosh, Democratic 23,266   32.9%    Won
Mary L. Washington, Democratic 22,334   31.6%    Won
Other Write-Ins 312   .44%    Lost
  • 2006 Race for Maryland House of Delegates – 43rd District[10]
Voters to choose three:
Name Votes Percent Outcome
Curt Anderson, Democratic 22,315   29.4%    Won
Maggie McIntosh, Democratic 22,093   29.1%    Won
Ann Marie Doory, Democratic 21,219   28.0%    Won
Armand F. Girard, Republican 3,425   4.5%    Lost
David G.S. Greene, Green 2,619   3.5%    Lost
Brandy Baker, Green 2,267   3.0%    Lost
Richard J. Ochs, Green 1,772   2.3%    Lost
  • 2002 Race for Maryland House of Delegates – 43rd District[11]
Voters to choose three:
Name Votes Percent Outcome
Maggie McIntosh, Democratic 21,993   32.5%    Won
Curt Anderson, Democratic 21,131   30.8%    Won
Ann Marie Doory, Democratic 19,999   29.15%    Won
John A. Heath, Republican 5,243   7.64%    Lost
Morning Sunday, Green(Write-In) 152   .22%    Lost
Other Write-Ins 97   .14%    Lost
  • 1998 Race for Maryland House of Delegates – District 42[12]
Voters to choose three:
Name Votes Percent Outcome
Samuel I. Rosenberg, Dem. 21,768   30%    Won
James W. Campbell, Dem. 20,903   29%    Won
Maggie McIntosh, Dem. 20,443   29%    Won
Jeffrey B. Smith Jr., Rep. 8,399   12%    Lost

Firsts[edit]

Delegate McIntosh is the first woman to be appointed majority leader in the Maryland House of Delegates [13] and the first openly gay person in the Maryland General Assembly.[14][15] She is also the first woman to serve as the chairman of the Environmental Matters Committee where she has steered several major legislative initiatives to passage. The Chesapeake Bay Restoration Act, which funded upgrades at wastewater treatment plants around the state, is among McIntosh's accomplishments, as well as an annexation measure passed in 2006 in which she brought counties and municipalities together. One of McIntosh's chief initiatives in 2007 is the Chesapeake Bay Green Fund, which would levy a surcharge on new development to pay for Bay restoration.[16]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Maggie McIntosh, Maryland State Delegate". Msa.md.gov. Retrieved 2013-12-05. 
  2. ^ "Looking after Maggie’s farm". Gazette.net. 2007-03-09. Retrieved 2013-12-05. 
  3. ^ Cecil, Andrea (2005-02-18). "Baltimore art teacher rises to top in Maryland politics". Daily Record. Retrieved 2009-04-12. 
  4. ^ Poll (2 April 2010). "Where Does Your Legislator Rank? See the list.". Maryland Gazette of Politics and Business. Retrieved 10 April 2010. 
  5. ^ "Circle of Excellence". Maryland Daily Record. Retrieved 11 January 2012. 
  6. ^ "2010 Regular Session HB 943". Maryland General Assembly. Retrieved 11 January 2012. 
  7. ^ "2010 Regular Session HB 943". Maryland General Assembly. Retrieved 11 January 2012. 
  8. ^ "House Bill 860". Maryland Legislative Services. Retrieved March 16, 2014. 
  9. ^ "House of Delegates Results". Maryland State Board of Elections.  Retrieved on Jan. 11, 2012
  10. ^ "House of Delegates Results". Maryland State Board of Elections.  Retrieved on Mar. 3, 2007
  11. ^ Maryland State Board of Elections (2002-12-02). "Maryland State Board of Elections". Elections.state.md.us. Retrieved 2013-12-05. 
  12. ^ "House of Delegates Results". Maryland State Board of Elections.  Retrieved on Nov. 6, 2007
  13. ^ http://andrejkoymasky.com/liv/fam/biom1/maci2.html.  Missing or empty |title= (help)[dead link]
  14. ^ "Maggie McIntosh : State House of Delegates, Dist. 43 (MD), Annapolis, Maryland - The Gay & Lesbian Victory Institute". Glli.org. Retrieved 2013-12-05. 
  15. ^ http://media.www.jhunewsletter.com/media/storage/paper932/news/2002/04/26/News/Mcintosh.Praises.Openness-2248396.shtml
  16. ^ http://mlis.state.md.us/2007rs/sponsors/mcintosh$.htm.  Missing or empty |title= (help)[dead link]

External links[edit]