Maggie Thrett

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Maggie Thrett
Born (1946-11-18) 18 November 1946 (age 67)
New York City
Occupation Singer, Stage / Film / television actor
Years active 1962–1970

Maggie Thrett, born Diane Pine,[1] was a singer and stage, movie and television actress in the 1960s. Aged fifteen, she made her Off-Broadway debut in 1962 in Out Brief Candle.[2] By the age of eighteen she was regularly performing as a dancer at Trude Heller's in Greenwich Village, New York, as noted in the January 1965 edition of Harper's Bazaar.[3]

As a vocalist, Maggie Thrett recorded a single (under her birth name) entitled "Lucky Girl" for Take 3 Records in 1964,[4] and had a minor US hit (as Maggie Thrett) in 1965 with "Soupy", produced by Bob Crewe and issued on the DynoVoice (formerly Dyno-Vox) label.[5] Billboard journalist Aaron Sternfield, reviewing a live Maggie Thrett performance at Basin Street East, New York, on July 15, 1965, wrote that she "has a magnificent range, her phrasing and timing are near perfect, and she blends the right combination of sex and satire."[6]

In 1966 Maggie Thrett went to Hollywood to further her acting career. As an actress, she is probably best remembered for her roles in a 1966 Star Trek episode ("Mudd's Women") and the 1968 comedy movie Three in the Attic. She also appeared as a prostitute in the 1970 movie Cover Me Babe. Having signed to Universal Studios, she is reported to have used her life savings to buy out her contract prior to appearing in Three in the Attic [7] for American International Pictures.

In May 1970, Maggie Thrett was involved in a road accident while a passenger on singer/songwriter Gram Parsons' motorcycle. Although she was apparently unharmed (Gram Parsons, meanwhile, suffered significant injuries),[8] it was soon after this that she disappeared from the entertainment business[9] having tired of continual auditioning and producers' unwanted advances. Within two years of leaving Hollywood, Maggie Thrett had met and married her husband, Alex, with whom she has had three children.[10]

Discography[edit]

  • "Lucky Girl" / "Your Love is Mine" (Take 3 709, 1964)
  • "Soupy" / "Put a Little Time Away" (DynoVoice 205, 1965)
  • "Soupy" / "Put a Little Time Away" (Barry B-3347, 1965) (Canadian release)

A further DynoVoice single, "Walk On By", is referenced in Aaron Sternfield's Billboard review of Maggie Thrett's July 1965 Basin Street East performance.[11] However, there is no evidence of this single's release in the DynoVoice singles catalog,[12] nor does any other source appear to corroborate its existence.

Filmography[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Lisanti, Tom, & Paul, Louis. (2002). Film fatales: women in espionage films and television, 1962-1973. McFarland & Co., p. 289. ISBN 978-0-7864-1194-8
  2. ^ Lisanti, Tom, & Paul, Louis. (2002). Film fatales: women in espionage films and television, 1962-1973. McFarland & Co., p. 289. ISBN 978-0-7864-1194-8
  3. ^ It's All The Streets You Crossed Not So Long Ago
  4. ^ Norman Bergen Discography
  5. ^ DynoVoice 45 Discography
  6. ^ Didley group electric act. (1965, July 31). Billboard, p. 12.
  7. ^ Lisanti, Tom, & Paul, Louis. (2002). Film fatales: women in espionage films and television, 1962-1973. McFarland & Co., p. 291. ISBN 978-0-7864-1194-8
  8. ^ Meyer, David N. (2008). Twenty thousand roads: the ballad of Gram Parsons and his cosmic American music. Villard, p. 332. ISBN 978-0-345-50336-7
  9. ^ Lisanti, Tom, & Paul, Louis. (2002). Film fatales: women in espionage films and television, 1962-1973. McFarland & Co., p. 291. ISBN 978-0-7864-1194-8
  10. ^ Maggie Thrett at Starbase Adran
  11. ^ Didley group electric act. (1965, July 31). Billboard, p. 12.
  12. ^ DynoVoice 45 Discography

External links[edit]