Maggie Williams

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Margaret A. Williams
Personal details
Born Kansas City, Missouri
Political party Democratic
Spouse(s) Bill Barrett
Residence Westerly, RI
Alma mater Trinity Washington University, Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania
Occupation Corporate Executive, Consultant, Government Official, Administrator
Religion Roman Catholicism
For other people named Margaret Williams, see Margaret Williams (disambiguation).

Margaret "Maggie" Ann Williams (born December 25, 1954 in Kansas City, Missouri) is a partner in Griffin Williams, a management-consulting firm.[1] She was the campaign manager for Hillary Rodham Clinton's 2008 presidential campaign. Following Clinton's win in the New Hampshire primary in January 2008, Williams was brought onto the Clinton campaign staff as a senior adviser. On February 10, 2008, she replaced Patti Solis Doyle as the campaign's manager.[2]

Early life and education[edit]

Williams attended high school at Notre Dame de Sion in Kansas City, Missouri. She received her B.A. in Political Science from Trinity College, Washington DC in 1977 and an honorary doctorate in 2009.[3] Williams also received a masters from the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania in 1990.

Early career[edit]

Williams was an aide to Representative Morris K. Udall, Democrat of Arizona from 1977–78, Press Secretary for the Democratic National Committee in 1979, manager of the Press office of the D.N.C. convention in 1980, campaign press secretary for Representative Robert G. Torricelli, Democrat of New Jersey in 1982, director of media relations for the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities in 1983, a member of the convention staff of the D.N.C. in 1984 and communications director for the Children's Defense Fund, 1984-1990.[4]

White House years[edit]

While at the Children's Defense Fund she met, and became friends with then First Lady of Arkansas Hillary Rodham Clinton. She served as Clinton's transition director in 1992 and as her chief of staff during her first term as First Lady of the United States (1993–1997), the first African American woman to hold that position and the first Chief of Staff to the First Lady who also served as an Assistant to the President. As stated in Taylor Branch's The Clinton Tapes, in 1994, President Clinton turned to Williams "to compile confidential suggestions" on personnel shifts...According to Branch, "When I asked how unusual it was for the first lady's office to be involved, he replied there was no easy blueprint for reorganizing the organizers. Williams was shrewd, discreet, and efficient."[5]

In a profile in Essence Magazine Ana Perez, who during George Bush's administration was the first Black person to serve as a press secretary to a First Lady said of Williams: "I am in awe of her...I have so much respect for her because she has this absolutely calm center and because she is a good and decent person. She's a do-gooder in every sense of the word."[6] She has been described as having "very good judgment on issues and people" by Leon Panetta.[7]

Vince Foster Scandal[edit]

On the night of the July 20, 1993 suicide of deputy White House counsel Vince Foster, a Secret Service agent claimed that he saw Williams remove two handfuls of folders from his office, which she vehemently denied.[8]

Post White House[edit]

After leaving the White House, Williams served as the President of Fenton Communications. In this position, she became the highest ranked black woman in an American top-50 public relations firm.[9] Previously, Williams served as a communications consultant in Paris.

President Bill Clinton asked Williams to be his chief of staff at the Clinton Foundation. She worked with President Clinton to develop his post-presidency agenda and launched the foundation's programming and policy efforts. She worked to ensure collaborative process between former Clinton Administration staff and the Clinton Library’s design and museum firm to insure a robust policy focus throughout the structure.[10]

In June 2014, she was named Director of the Institute of Politics at the Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University.

2008 presidential campaign[edit]

Williams became the campaign manager for Hillary Rodham Clinton's 2008 presidential campaign after being brought on as a senior adviser following Clinton's win in the New Hampshire primary in January 2008. On February 10, 2008, she replaced Patti Solis Doyle as the campaign's manager.[11] and infused Clinton's campaign "with a sense of purpose" according to staffers.[12] In their book, The Battle for America: The Story of an Extraordinary Election, Haynes Johnson and Dan Balz wrote that with Williams in charge the campaign was more collegial and operated with greater efficiency.[13]

Boards and affiliations[edit]

In addition to her consulting business, Williams is a director of the Scholastic Publishing Corporation,[14] the Clinton Health Access Initiative (CHAI). She is a trustee of the Rhode Island School of Design[15] and a US Commissioner for the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). From 2000 to 2007, Williams also served as director at Delta Financial Corporation, a mortgage lender that filed for bankruptcy in December 2007.[16] She serves on the Advisory Boards of the Eli J. Segal Citizenship Program at Brandeis University and the Institute of Politics (IOP) at the Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University.[17]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "A Conversation with Maggie WIlliams '77". Trinity Washington University. Summer 2010. Retrieved 2011-06-17. 
  2. ^ Beth Fouhy (2008-02-10). "Clinton replaces campaign manager". Associated Press. Retrieved 2008-02-10. [dead link]
  3. ^ "Maggie Williams, Commencement Address". Trinity College. Summer 2009. Retrieved 2011-02-10. 
  4. ^ "Maggie Williams, Ex-Chief Of Staff For Hillary Clinton, To Head Firm In D.C". Jet Magazine. 2000-10-16. Retrieved 2008-02-10. 
  5. ^ Branch, Taylor (2009). The Clinton tapes : wrestling history with the president (1st Simon & Schuster hardcover ed. ed.). New York, N.Y.: Simon & Schuster. pp. 160–161. ISBN 978-1-4165-4333-6. 
  6. ^ Vanessa J. Gallman, Women Who Make A Difference; Maggie Williams, Essence, 10/93
  7. ^ Pal Runs to Clinton's Rescue, McClatchy, 2/16/08
  8. ^ http://michaelgraham.com/hillarys-bag-man-er-person-takes-the-helm-at-the-iop/
  9. ^ "Maggie Williams, Former Fellow". Harvard University Institute of Politics. Retrieved 2011-06-17. 
  10. ^ Martha T. Moore (2004-02-15). "Clinton Busy Writing Own Job Description". USA Today. Retrieved 2011-06-17. 
  11. ^ Beth Fouhy (2008-02-10). "Clinton replaces campaign manager". Associated Press. Retrieved 2008-02-10. [dead link]
  12. ^ Early mistakes couldn’t be fixed, Fort Worth Star-Telegram, 6/4/08
  13. ^ Dan Balz; Haynes Johnson (2009). The Battle for America: The Story of an Extraordinary Election. New York: Penguin Books. ISBN 978-0-14-311770-4. 
  14. ^ "Scholastic Committee Composition". Scholastic. Retrieved 2011-05-29. 
  15. ^ http://www.risd.edu/About/History_Mission_Governance/Leadership/
  16. ^ Glenn Thrush (2008-03-29). "Clinton campaign head made $200,000 with subprime lender". Newsday. Retrieved 2008-03-31. 
  17. ^ "Maggie Williams, Former Fellow". Harvard University Institute of Politics. Retrieved 2011-06-17. 

References[edit]

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