Magic: The Gathering Pro Tour season 2005

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
2005 Pro Tour season
Pro Player of the Year Japan Kenji Tsumura
Rookie of the Year France Pierre Canali
World Champion Japan Katsuhiro Mori
Pro Tours 7
Grands Prix 31
Hall of Fame inductions Jon Finkel
Darwin Kastle
Alan Comer
Tommi Hovi
Olle Råde
Start of season 10 September 2004
End of season 4 December 2005

The 2005 Pro Tour season was the tenth season of the Magic: The Gathering Pro Tour. On 10 September 2004 the season began with Grand Prix Rimini. It ended on 4 December 2005 with the conclusion of the 2005 World Championship in Yokohama and was thus the longest Pro Tour season ever. The season consisted of 31 Grand Prixs and 7 Pro Tours, held in Columbus, Nagoya, Atlanta, Philadelphia, London, Los Angeles, and Yokohama. At the end of the season Kenji Tsumura was proclaimed Pro Player of the year as the first Japanese player. Also the first class of the Hall of Fame was inducted. The inductees were Jon Finkel, Darwin Kastle, Tommi Hovi, Alan Comer, and Olle Råde.

Grand Prixs – Rimini, Vienna, Austin[edit]

Pro Tour – Columbus (29–31 October 2004)[edit]

Pierre Canali from France won the inaugural Pro Tour of the season, which was also the first Pro Tour he attended. His deck was an aggressive all-artifact deck called "Affinity". For the first time Japan had three players amongst the final eight while the USA had in the Top 8 for the first time in three Pro Tours.[1]

Tournament data[edit]

Prize pool: $200,130
Players: 286
Format: Extended
Head Judge: Jaap Brouwer[2]

Top 8[edit]

Quarter-finals Semi-finals Finals
                 
1 Pierre Canali 3
8 Geoffrey Siron 1
Pierre Canali 3
Olivier Ruel 2
5 Masashi Oiso 0
4 Olivier Ruel 3
Pierre Canali 3
Shuhei Nakamura 0
2 Nicholas West 3
7 Ryuichi Arita 0
Nicholas West 0
Shuhei Nakamura 3
3 Gadiel Szleifer 1
6 Shuhei Nakamura 3

Final standings[edit]

Place Player Prize Pro Points Comment
1 France Pierre Canali $30,000 25 Pro Tour debut
2 Japan Shuhei Nakamura $20,000 20
3 United Kingdom Nicholas West $15,000 16 Pro Tour debut
4 France Olivier Ruel $13,000 16 3rd Final day
5 United States Gadiel Szleifer $9,000 12
6 Japan Masashi Oiso $8,500 12 4th Final day
7 Japan Ryuichi Arita $8,000 12 2nd Final day
8 Belgium Geoffrey Siron $7,500 12

Pro Player of the year standings[edit]

Rank Player Pro Points
1 France Pierre Canali 25
2 Japan Shuhei Nakamura 20
3 France Olivier Ruel 18
4 United Kingdom Nicholas West 16
5 Japan Ryuichi Arita 12
Japan Masashi Oiso 12
Belgium Geoffrey Siron 12
United States Gadiel Szleifer 12

Grand Prixs – Helsinki, Brisbane, Yokohama, Porto Alegre, Paris, Chicago, Osaka[edit]

Pro Tour – Nagoya (28–30 January 2005)[edit]

Pro Tour Nagoya was the last Pro Tour employing the Rochester Draft format. Shu Komuro from Japan defeated Anton Jonsson in the finals to win the tournament.[3]

Tournament data[edit]

Prize pool: $200,130
Players: 236
Format: Rochester Draft (Champions of Kamigawa)
Head Judge: Collin Jackson[2]

Top 8[edit]

Quarter-finals Semi-finals Finals
                 
1 Masashiro Kuroda 1
8 Anton Jonsson 3
Anton Jonsson 3
Terry Soh 1
5 Frank Karsten 1
4 Terry Soh 3
Anton Jonsson 1
Shu Komuro 3
2 Jarno Harkonen 1
7 Murray Evans 3
Murray Evans 1
Shu Komuro 3
3 Vasilis Fatouros 1
6 Shu Komuro 3

Final standings[edit]

Place Player Prize Pro Points Comment
1 Japan Shu Komuro $30,000 25
2 Sweden Anton Jonsson $20,000 20 5th Final day
3 Malaysia Terry Soh $15,000 16 2nd Final day
4 Canada Murray Evans $13,000 16 2nd Final day
5 Japan Masashiro Kuroda $9,500 12 2nd Final day
6 Netherlands Frank Karsten $8,500 12
7 Finland Jarno Harkonen $7,500 12
8 Greece Vasilis Fatouros $6,500 12 1st Greek in a Top 8

Pro Player of the year standings[edit]

Rank Player Pro Points
1 Japan Shu Komuro 31
2 Japan Shuhei Nakamura 30
3 France Pierre Canali 28
4 France Olivier Ruel 27
5 Sweden Anton Jonsson 23

Grand Prixs – Boston, Eindhoven, Seattle[edit]

Pro Tour – Atlanta (11–13 March 2005)[edit]

The Canadian French cooperation team "Nova" won Pro Tour Atlanta, defeating the American team "We Add" in the final. "Nova" consisted of Gabriel Tsang, David Rood, and Gabriel Nassif. For Nassif it was the first Pro Tour victory after five previous final day appareances including three second places.[4] Atlanta was the last Pro Tour using the three person team Limited format, although it was still used for the team competition at the World Championship that year and the next.

Tournament data[edit]

Players: 357 (119 teams)
Prize Pool: $200,100
Format: Team Kamigawa Block Sealed (Champions of Kamigawa, Betrayers of Kamigawa) – first day, Team Kamigawa Block Rochester Draft (Champions of Kamigawa-Betrayers of Kamigawa) – final two days
Head Judge: Sheldon Menery[2]

Top 4[edit]

Semifinals Semi-finals
           
1 Les baltringues de Ludipia 0
4 We Add 2
We add 0
Nova 2
3 One Spin 1
2 Nova 2

Final standings[edit]

Place Team Player Prize Pro Points Comment
1 Nova Canada Gabriel Tsang $60,000 20 3rd Final day
Canada David Rood 20 2nd Final day
France Gabriel Nassif 20 6th Final day
2 We Add United States Don Smith $30,000 16 Pro Tour debut
United States Andrew Pacifico 16
United States Adam Chambers 16
3 Les baltringues de Ludipia France Benjamin Caumes $18,000 12 2nd Final day
France Nicolas Bornarel 12
France Camille Fenet 12
4 One Spin Japan Tomohiro Kaji $15,000 12
Japan Kenji Tsumura 12
Japan Tomoharu Saitou 12

Pro Player of the year standings[edit]

Rank Player Pro Points
1 Japan Shu Komuro 39
2 Japan Shuhei Nakamura 32
3 France Pierre Canali 31
France Olivier Ruel 31
5 Japan Masashi Oiso 29

Grand Prixs – Singapore, Leipzig, Lisbon, Detroit[edit]

Pro Tour – Philadelphia (6–8 May 2005)[edit]

Pro Tour Philadelphia featured a tournament system different from those of other Pro Tours. While Swiss system was still used all players with three or more losses and/or draws were automatically dropped from the tournament. Prizes were given out not in relation to the final standings, but for the individual matches won, where matches in later rounds of the tournament were worth more than those in the earlier rounds.[5] It was also announced in the week prior to Pro Tour Philadelphia, that the end of the year payout based on Pro Points would be dropped after the season in favor of the Pro Club. Under the new system a player would receive special benefits based on the total amount of Pro Points he had acquired in a season.[6]

16-year-old Gadiel Szleifer defeated 18-year-old Kenji Tsumura in the final to win the tournament. Szleifer played a control deck built around Gifts Ungiven.[7] Former Pro Player of the year Kai Budde received a lot of attention for being undefeated after day one, but was eliminated after he picked up three losses in the first three rounds of day two.[8]

Tournament data[edit]

Players: 311
Prize Pool: $194,898
Format: Kamigawa Block Constructed (Champions of Kamigawa, Betrayers of Kamigawa)
Head Judge: Mike Guptil[2]

Top 8[edit]

Quarter-finals Semi-finals Finals
                 
1 Steven Wolfman 3
8 André Müller 2
Steven Wolfman 0
Gadiel Szleifer 3
5 Jeff Novekoff 1
4 Gadiel Szleifer 3
Gadiel Szleifer 3
Kenji Tsumura 2
3 Ryan Cimera 2
6 Kenji Tsumura 3
Kenji Tsumura 3
Olivier Ruel 0
7 Olivier Ruel 3
2 Mark Herberholz 1

Final standings[edit]

Place Player Prize Pro Points Comment
1 United States Gadiel Szleifer $21,725 25 2nd Final day
2 Japan Kenji Tsumura $12,275 20 2nd Final day
3 Canada Steven Wolfman $7,475 16 2nd Final day
4 France Olivier Ruel $6,950 16 4th Final day
5 United States Ryan Cimera $2,825 12 Pro Tour debut
6 United States Jeff Novekoff $4,750 12 Pro Tour debut
7 United States Mark Herberholz $3,175 12 2nd Final day
8 Germany André Müller $2,075 12

Pro Player of the year standings[edit]

Rank Player Pro Points
1 France Olivier Ruel 49
2 United States Gadiel Szleifer 47
3 Japan Shu Komuro 45
4 Japan Kenji Tsumura 44
5 Japan Shuhei Nakamura 40

Grand Prixs – Matsuyama, Bologna[edit]

Pro Tour – London (8–10 July 2005)[edit]

Geoffrey Siron from Belgium won Pro Tour London, defeating Tsuyoshi Fujita in the finals. In the Top 8 Siron did not lose a single game.[9]

Tournament data[edit]

Players: 314
Prize Pool: $200,130
Format: Booster Draft (Champions of Kamigawa-Betrayers of Kamigawa-Saviors of Kamigawa)
Head Judge: Jaap Brouwer[2]

Top 8[edit]

Quarter-finals Semi-finals Finals
                 
1 Antti Malin 3
8 Tomi Walamies 1
Antti Malin 1
Tsuyoshi Fujita 3
5 Arnost Zidek 2
4 Tsuyoshi Fujita 3
Tsuyoshi Fujita 0
Geoffrey Siron 3
2 David Larsson 1
7 Johan Sadeghpour 3
Johan Sadeghpour 0
Geoffrey Siron 3
3 Masashi Oiso 0
6 Geoffrey Siron 3

Final standings[edit]

Place Player Prize Pro Points Comment
1 Belgium Geoffrey Siron $30,000 25 2nd Final day, 1st Belgian to win a Pro Tour
2 Japan Tsuyoshi Fujita $20,000 20 2nd Final day
3 Sweden Johan Sadeghpour $15,000 16
4 Finland Antti Malin $13,000 16
5 Japan Masashi Oiso $9,000 12 5th Final day
6 Finland Tomi Walamies $8,500 12 3rd Final day
7 Czech Republic Arnost Zidek $8,000 12
8 Sweden David Larsson $7,500 12

Pro Player of the year standings[edit]

Rank Player Pro Points
1 France Olivier Ruel 59
2 United States Gadiel Szleifer 50
3 Japan Shu Komuro 49
4 Japan Shuhei Nakamura 47
Japan Masashi Oiso 47
Japan Kenji Tsumura 47

Grand Prixs – Minneapolis, Niigata, Taipei, Salt Lake City, Mexico City, Nottingham[edit]

Pro Tour – Los Angeles (28–30 October 2005)[edit]

Antoine Ruel defeated Billy Moreno in the finals to become champion of Pro Tour Los Angeles. He played a blue-black control deck, built around Psychatog.[10]

Tournament data[edit]

Players: 340
Prize Pool: $200,130
Format: Extended
Head Judge: Gijsbert Hoogendijk[2]

Top 8[edit]

Quarter-finals Semi-finals Finals
                 
1 Kenji Tsumura 3
8 Ryuichi Arita 1
Kenji Tsumura 0
Antoine Ruel 3
5 Antoine Ruel 3
4 Tsuyoshi Fujita 1
Antoine Ruel 3
Billy Moreno 0
2 Billy Morena 3
7 Ervin Tormos 2
Billy Moreno 3
Chris McDaniel 2
3 Chris McDaniel 3
6 Chih-Hsian Chang 1

Final standings[edit]

Place Player Prize Pro Points Comment
1 France Antoine Ruel $30,000 25 3rd Final day
2 United States Billy Moreno $20,000 20
3 Japan Kenji Tsumura $15,000 16 3rd Final day
4 United States Chris McDaniel $13,000 16
5 Japan Tsuyoshi Fujita $9,000 12 3rd Final day
6 Taiwan Chih-Hsiang Chang $8,500 12 1st Taiwanese Player in a Top 8
7 United States Ervin Tormos $8,000 12 Pro Tour debut
8 Japan Ryuichi Arita $7,500 12 3rd Final day

Pro Player of the year standings[edit]

Rank Player Pro Points
1 Japan Kenji Tsumura 72
2 France Olivier Ruel 67
3 Japan Masashi Oiso 62
4 United States Gadiel Szleifer 58
5 Japan Shu Komuro 55

Grand Prixs – Melbourne, Copenhagen, Kitakyuushuu, Philadelphia, Bilbao, Beijing[edit]

2005 World Championships – Yokohama (30 November – 4 December 2005)[edit]

The tournament began with the first Hall of Fame induction ceremony. Jon Finkel, Darwin Kastle, Tommi Hovi, Alan Comer and Olle Råde were honored for their accomplishments and their determination to the game. In the final of the 2005 World Championship Katsuhiro Mori defeated Frank Karsten, thus completing an all-Japanese Worlds in Yokohama. The Top 4 also included Japanese players Akira Asahara and Tomohiro Kaji, shortly before Japan had won the team competition, and even the Pro Player of the year went to Japanese Kenji Tsumura.[11]

Tournament data[edit]

Prize pool: $208,130 (individual) + $195,000 (national teams)
Players: 287
Formats: Standard, Booster Draft (Ravnica), Extended
Head Judge: Collin Jackson, Sheldon Menery[2]

Top 8[edit]

Quarter-finals Semi-finals Finals
                 
1 Marcio Carvalho 1
8 Akira Asahara 3
Akira Asahara 2
Frank Karsten 3
5 Ding Leong 2
4 Frank Karsten 3
Frank Karsten 1
Katsuhiro Mori 3
2 Tomohiro Kaji 3
7 André Coimbra 1
Tomohiro Kaji 1
Katsuhiro Mori 3
3 Katsuhiro Mori 3
6 Shuhei Nakamura 0

Final standings[edit]

Place Player Prize Pro Points Comment
1 Japan Katsuhiro Mori $35,000 32
2 Netherlands Frank Karsten $23,000 24 2nd Final day
3 Japan Tomohiro Kaji $15,000 16 2nd Final day
4 Japan Akira Asahara $13,000 16
5 Portugal Marcio Carvalho $9,500 12
6 Singapore Ding Leong $8,500 12
7 Japan Shuhei Nakamura $7,500 12 2nd Final day
8 Portugal André Coimbra $6,500 12

National team competition[edit]

  1. Japan Japan (Ichiro Shimura, Takuma Morifuji, Masashi Oiso)
  2. United States United States (Jonathan Sonne, Antonino De Rosa, Neil Reeves)

Pro Player of the year final standings[edit]

After the World Championship Kenji Tsumura was awarded the Pro Player of the year title as the first Japanese player.

Rank Player Pro Points Prize
1 Japan Kenji Tsumura 84 $12,000
2 France Olivier Ruel 83 $11,800
3 Japan Masashi Oiso 80 $11,600
4 Japan Shuhei Nakamura 66 $11,400
5 United States Gadiel Szleifer 62 $11,200

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Canali Crushes Columbus". Wizards of the Coast. 31 October 2004. Retrieved 24 March 2009. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g "Head Judges of Pro Tours and World Championships". XS4ALL. 30 October 2009. Retrieved 16 November 2009. 
  3. ^ "Komuro Finishes the Rochester". Wizards of the Coast. 30 January 2005. Retrieved 24 March 2009. 
  4. ^ "Nova Burns Brightest in Atlanta". Wizards of the Coast. 13 March 2005. Retrieved 25 March 2009. 
  5. ^ "2005 Pro Tour-Philadelphia". Wizards of the Coast. 2005$2. Retrieved 25 March 2009. 
  6. ^ Buehler, Randy (2 May 2005). "Welcome to the Pro Players Club". Wizards of the Coast. Retrieved 25 March 2009. 
  7. ^ "Szleifer Seizes Sunday". Wizards of the Coast. 8 May 2004. Retrieved 25 March 2009. 
  8. ^ David-Marshall, Brian (7 May 2005). "Feature: Kai Budde in Black and White". Wizards of the Coast. Retrieved 25 March 2009. 
  9. ^ "Siron Sweeps to Victory". Wizards of the Coast. 10 July 2005. Retrieved 25 March 2009. 
  10. ^ "A Starring Role for Antoine Ruel". Wizards of the Coast. 30 October 2005. Retrieved 25 March 2009. 
  11. ^ "Worlds 2005: Japan's Crowning Achievement". Wizards of the Coast. 4 December 2005. Retrieved 25 March 2009.