Magic Roundabout (Hemel Hempstead)

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Road sign showing the official name Plough Roundabout
Magic Roundabout, looking south with mini roundabouts 1 (nearest), 2 and 3 in view. The grassy bank at the centre of the picture is part of the central hub roundabout. Taken from part of the new Riverside development
Line drawing of the roundabout in its first configuration. The road labelled '2' is the dual-carriageway St Albans Road and provides the main access to Hemel from the M1 motorway.

The "Magic Roundabout" in Hemel Hempstead, Hertfordshire, England is the familiar name given to the Plough roundabout. The familiar name comes from the children's television programme, and is also used for a similar junction in Swindon and the M40 junction in Denham. The official name relates to a former public house, called The Plough Inn, which was between the junction of what is now Selden Hill and St Albans Road.

Description[edit]

Constructed in 1973, the "Magic Roundabout" in Hemel Hempstead was voted the UK's second-worst roundabout in a 2005 poll held by an insurance company (the winner being its Swindon counterpart).[1]

In 2011 the roundabout was voted the best in Britain by motorists in a competition organised by a car leasing service.[2]

Early history[edit]

The original magic roundabout had six exits in total, with the British Petroleum building spanning "Marlowes", the road leading to the town centre, in the approximate position of the earlier railway viaduct. The BP building was found to be unstable due to defective reinforced concrete and the exit had to be closed. The building was demolished but the original route was not restored, although a newer side exit from the roundabout replaced the junction with Marlowes off a side road.

Other similar roundabouts[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 51°44′46″N 00°28′23″W / 51.74611°N 0.47306°W / 51.74611; -0.47306