Maglalatik

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The Maglalatik(also known as Magbabao) is an indigenous dance from the Philippines in which coconut shell halves that are secured onto the dancers' hands and on vests upon which are hung four or six more coconut shell halves. The dancers - all male - perform the dance by hitting one coconut shell with the other - sometimes the ones on the hands, sometimes, the ones on the body, and sometimes the shells worn by another performer, all in time to a fast drumbeat. Like many native Filipino dances, it is intended to impress the viewer with the great skill of the dancer, and in some Filipino Martial Arts (FMA) circles, it has been noted that the manlalatik "consists of a trapping and boxing method hidden in a dance."[1]

By-product, 2012 Good Friday burned "latik" with the coconut healing oil as main product.

The name of the dance comes from the Filipino word "Latik", which means "fried coconut milk curd", a coconut product that is used in Filipino cooking, particularly in snacks.

Sources[edit]

  1. ^ Kautz, Pete (2005). "The Tinikling: How Traditional Filipino Dance Can Develop Your Combative Attributes!". Alliance Martial Arts. Retrieved January 15, 2009. 

The Maglalatik is an indigenous dance from the Philippines in which coconut shell halves that are secured onto the dancers' hands and on vests upon which are hung four or six more coconut shell halves. The dancers - all male - perform the dance by hitting one coconut shell with the other - sometimes the ones on the hands, sometimes, the ones on the body, and sometimes the shells worn by another performer, all in time to a fast drumbeat.

Originally performed in Binan, Laguna as a mock-war dance that demonstrates a fight between the Moros and the Christians over the prized latik or coconut meat during the Spanish rule, this dance is also shown to pay tribute to the town’s patron saint, San Isidro Labrador. It has a four-part performance such as the palipasan and the baligtaran showing the intense battle, the paseo and the escaramusa- the reconciliation. Moro dancers wear read trousers while the Christian dancers show up in blue. All dancers are male; with harnesses of coconut shells attached on their chests, backs, thighs and hips.

See also[edit]