Magnesium injection cycle

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Magnesium Injection Cycle (MAGIC) is an engine design currently under development by Mitsubishi Corporation and the Tokyo Institute of Technology which uses magnesium and water to generate power.[1][2][3][4][5] The engine also makes use of solar-powered lasers.

Overview[edit]

The joint project, initiated in 2005 and still in the experimental stage, developed a prototype carbon dioxide (CO
2
)-free engine in 2006 that ran successfully without the need for fossil fuels. The chemical reaction between magnesium (in a powder form) and water at room temperature produces high-energy steam and hydrogen. The hydrogen is burned at the same time to produce additional high-energy steam. These two steam sources power the engine. The energy cycle produces no carbon dioxide or other harmful emissions. The only by-products of this reaction are water and magnesium oxide. The magnesium (a common metallic element) is separated from the oxygen through a solar-powered laser process (the development of which is already well advanced) and is reused over and over again as fuel.[1][2][3]

Output[edit]

Despite its small dimensions (approx. 5 cm in diameter and 13.5 cm in height), the engine can generate a heat output of several tens of kW from which power is obtained.[3] The engine is aimed to be used in cogeneration, automobiles, ships, and many other areas. A statement in 2006 claimed that further research is planned with the aim of commercialization in the next three years.[1][3] No updated timeline has been released.

Personnel[edit]

The engine development was led by Professor Takashi Yabe with the help of Professor Ikuta and others of Tokyo Institute of Technology with the cooperation of Ono Denki Seisakusho, K.K., a precision manufacturer located in Shinagawa, Tokyo.[3] Professor Yabe performed experiments of the technology in 2007 at the Hokkaido Toyako G8 environmental summit hosted in Chitose, Japan.[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "CO
    2
    -Free Engine Powers Up"
    , Mitsubishi website
  2. ^ a b c "Clean Magnesium Energy Cycle Hints at Fossil Fuel Freedom", by Steve Levenstein, July 27, 2007, InventorSpot.com
  3. ^ a b c d e "TIT & Mitsubishi Prototypes Pollution-free Engine Excluding Fossil Fuel", by Motohiko Hamada and Nikkei Monozukuri, techon.nikkeibp.co.jp
  4. ^ a b Duncan Graham-Rowe (September 19, 2007). "Solar-Powered Laser". MIT Technology Review. 
  5. ^ Applied Physics Letters (2007), cited in [4]