Magnetic photon

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In physics, a magnetic photon is a hypothetical particle. It is a mixture of even and odd C-parity states and, unlike the normal photon, does not couple to leptons. It is predicted by certain extensions of electromagnetism to include magnetic monopoles. There is no experimental evidence for the existence of this particle, and several versions [1] have been ruled out by negative experiments.[2]

The magnetic photon was predicted in 1966 by Nobel laureate Abdus Salam.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ R. W. Kühne (1997): "A model of magnetic monopoles". Modern Physics Letters A 12: 3153-3159 http://arxiv.org/abs/hep-ph/9708394
  2. ^ R. S. Lakes (2004): "Experimental test of magnetic photons". Physics Letters A 329: 298-300 http://arxiv.org/abs/physics/0405148
  3. ^ A. Salam (1966). "Magnetic monopole and two photon theories of C-violation". Physics Letters 22 (5): 683–684. Bibcode:1966PhL....22..683S. doi:10.1016/0031-9163(66)90704-9.