Magneto and Titanium Man

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"Magneto and Titanium Man"
Single by Wings
from the album Venus and Mars
A-side "Venus and Mars/Rock Show"
Released 1 November 1975
Format 7" single
Recorded January - April 1975
Genre Rock
Length 3:16
Label Capitol
Writer(s) Paul McCartney
Producer(s) Paul McCartney
Wings singles chronology
"Letting Go"
(1975)
"Venus and Mars/Rock Show"
(1975)
"Silly Love Songs"
(1976)
Venus and Mars track listing

"Magneto and Titanium Man" is the B-side song to Wings' single, "Venus and Mars/Rock Show" in 1975.

Lyrics[edit]

The song is in narrative form, and includes the Marvel Comics characters Magneto, Titanium Man, and the Crimson Dynamo in its story. When asked his opinion of the song decades after its release, Stan Lee (who co-created all three characters) said he thought it was "terrific".[1]

Live[edit]

The song was included in the setlist for the band's 1975/1976 world tours. While it was performed, comic art of Magneto, created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby and Titanium Man & the Crimson Dynamo, created by Stan Lee and Don Heck were projected onto the large screen behind the band. McCartney, a Marvel Comics fan and comic book fan in general, contacted Marvel Comics to hire Kirby for the backdrop art. On the L.A. leg of the tour, McCartney gave Kirby front row seats and back stage passes (his daughter was a big Wings and Beatles fan), and Kirby backstage gave Paul and Linda an original comic drawing he did of them.[2]

The artwork projected on the backdrop, however, was not drawn by Jack Kirby or Don Heck. The Magneto figure is by George Tuska & John Tartaglione from X-Men #43 (April 1968, on sale February, 1968), the Titanium Man is by George Tuska & Mike Esposito from Iron Man #22 (February 1970, on sale December 1969), and the Crimson Dynamo is by Sal Buscema & Joe Staton from Avengers #130 (December 1974, on sale October 1974). The two BG figures are flopped from their original Comic Book presentation.

The song can be heard coming from a radio, creating an argument during a scene in the 1976 Mike Leigh play Nuts in May.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Stan's Soapbox", Marvel Comics cover-dated June 2000, including Spider-Woman (vol. 3) #12 (June 2000).
  2. ^ Gallagher, Paul. "When Paul McCartney Met Jack Kirby". Dangerous Minds. Retrieved 12 December 2011.