Magnolia Bowl

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Magnolia Bowl
Magnolia bowl.png
Louisiana State University (block logo).svg UMRebels logo (script).png
LSU Tigers Ole Miss Rebels

Sport(s) Football
Total meetings 103
Series record LSU leads, 59–40–4
First meeting December 3, 1894
Ole Miss 26, LSU 6
Last meeting October 25, 2014
LSU 10, Ole Miss 7
Next meeting November 21, 2015
Largest win LSU, 52–3 (2011)
Longest win streak LSU, 8 (1928-1937)
Current win streak LSU, 1 (2014–present)
Trophy

Magnolia Bowl Trophy

trophy originated 2008

The LSU–Ole Miss football rivalry, renamed the Magnolia Bowl[1] in 2008, is an American college football rivalry game played annually by the LSU Tigers football team of Louisiana State University (LSU) and the Ole Miss Rebels football team of the University of Mississippi (Ole Miss). The teams compete for the Magnolia Bowl Trophy. The Tigers and the Rebels first met in 1894, and have been regular opponents in Southeastern Conference (SEC), meeting annually since 1945. The rivalry was at its height during the 1950s and 1960s, when both teams were highly ranked and during which time both teams claimed a national championship. The rivalry died down from the 1970s to the 1990s, owing to Ole Miss not returning to conference or national prominence since the 1970s and because LSU has seen new rivalries emerge when the SEC split into two divisions in 1992, most notably Auburn, Alabama, and Florida. Even though the rivalry has not attracted the same national attention in recent years, it still stirs up passion in both Oxford and Baton Rouge.

In 2008, the student bodies of both schools elected to christen the yearly contest the "Magnolia Bowl", the magnolia flower being the state flower of both Louisiana and Mississippi, and award a trophy to the winner. Ole Miss defeated LSU 31–13 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana to become the first winner of the new trophy.

LSU leads the all time series, 59–40–4. However, LSU already held a 20–7 lead in games played prior to 1938. Since then the rivalry has been much tighter with the Tigers leading 38–33–4. In many cases, wins have come in streaks with the longest being 8, (LSU: 1928–1937). The next longest win streak is 6, a total reached by both Ole Miss and LSU. The Tigers won from 2002 to 2007, while the Rebels were able to defeat LSU from 1952 to 1957.

It is the second most played rivalry for both teams. The 2011 edition in Oxford was the 100th meeting between the two schools. It was also the most lopsided game in series history, as top-ranked LSU defeated Ole Miss and coach Houston Nutt 52–3.

Game results[edit]

LSU vs. Ole Miss

Ole Miss victories are shaded ██ blue. LSU victories shaded in ██ gold. Ties shaded white.

Date Site Winning team Losing team Series
December 3, 1894 Baton Rouge Ole Miss     26  LSU 6 Ole Miss 1–0
November 13, 1896 Vicksburg LSU 12 Ole Miss     4 Tied 1–1
November 3, 1899 Meridian Ole Miss 11 LSU 0 Ole Miss 2–1
November 7, 1901 Baton Rouge LSU 46 Ole Miss     0 Tied 2–2
 November 8, 1902  New Orleans LSU 6 Ole Miss 0 LSU 3–2
November 21, 1903 New Orleans Ole Miss 11 LSU 0 Tied 3–3
November 5, 1904 Baton Rouge LSU 5 Ole Miss 0 LSU 4–3
October 20, 1906 Baton Rouge Ole Miss 9 LSU 0 Tied 4–4
November 16, 1907 Jackson LSU 23 Ole Miss 0 LSU 5–4
October 9, 1909 Baton Rouge LSU 10 Ole Miss 0 LSU 6–4
October 19, 1912 Baton Rouge Ole Miss 10 LSU 7 LSU 6–5
October 17, 1914 Baton Rouge Ole Miss 21 LSU 0 Tied 6–6
October 15, 1915 Oxford LSU 28 Ole Miss 0 LSU 7–6
November 18, 1916 Baton Rouge LSU 41 Ole Miss  0  LSU 8–6
October 13, 1917 Oxford LSU 52 Ole Miss 7 LSU 9–6
October 18, 1919 Baton Rouge LSU 13 Ole Miss 0 LSU 10–6
November 12, 1921 Baton Rouge LSU 21 Ole Miss 0 LSU 11–6
November 13, 1926 Baton Rouge LSU 3 Ole Miss 0 LSU 12–6
November 5, 1927 Oxford Ole Miss 12 LSU 7 LSU 12–7
November 10, 1928 Baton Rouge LSU 19 Ole Miss 6 LSU 13–7
November 16, 1929 Baton Rouge LSU 13 Ole Miss 6 LSU 14–7
November 8, 1930 Baton Rouge LSU 6 Ole Miss 0 LSU 15–7
November 13, 1931 Jackson LSU 26 Ole Miss 3 LSU 16–7
November 8, 1933 Baton Rouge LSU 31 Ole Miss 0 LSU 17–7
November 17, 1934 Jackson LSU 14 Ole Miss 0 LSU 18–7
October 17, 1936 Baton Rouge LSU 13 Ole Miss 0 LSU 19–7
September 24, 1937 Baton Rouge LSU 13 Ole Miss 7 LSU 20–7
September 24, 1938 Baton Rouge Ole Miss 20 LSU 7 LSU 20–8
September 30, 1939 Baton Rouge Ole Miss 14 LSU 7 LSU 20–9
September 28, 1940 Baton Rouge Ole Miss 19 LSU 6 LSU 20–10
November 8, 1941 Baton Rouge Ole Miss 13 LSU 12 LSU 20–11
October 17, 1942 Baton Rouge LSU 21 Ole Miss 7 LSU 21–11
November 3, 1945 Baton Rouge LSU 32 Ole Miss 13 LSU 22–11
November 13, 1946 Baton Rouge LSU 34 Ole Miss 21 LSU 23–11
November 1, 1947 Baton Rouge Ole Miss 20 LSU 18 LSU 23–12
October 30, 1948 Baton Rouge Ole Miss 49 LSU 19 LSU 23–13
October 10, 1949 Baton Rouge LSU 34 Ole Miss 7 LSU 24–13
November 4, 1950 Baton Rouge LSU 40 Ole Miss 14 LSU 25–13
November 3, 1951 Baton Rouge LSU 6 Ole Miss 6 LSU 25–13–1
November 1, 1952 Oxford Ole Miss 28 LSU 0 LSU 25–14–1
October 31, 1953 Baton Rouge Ole Miss 27 LSU 16 LSU 25–15–1
October 30, 1954 Baton Rouge Ole Miss 21 LSU 6 LSU 25–16–1
October 29, 1955 Baton Rouge Ole Miss 29 LSU 26 LSU 25–17–1
November 3, 1956 Baton Rouge Ole Miss 46 LSU 17 LSU 25–18–1
November 9, 1957 Oxford Ole Miss 14 LSU 12 LSU 25–19–1
November 1, 1958 Baton Rouge LSU 14 Ole Miss 0 LSU 26–19–1
October 31, 1959 Baton Rouge LSU 7 Ole Miss 3 LSU 27–19–1
January 1, 1960 New Orleans (Sugar Bowl) Ole Miss 21 LSU 0 LSU 27–20–1
October 29, 1960 Oxford Ole Miss 6 LSU 6 LSU 27–20–2
November 4, 1961 Baton Rouge LSU 10 Ole Miss 7 LSU 28–20–2
November 3, 1962 Baton Rouge Ole Miss 15 LSU 7 LSU 28–21–2
November 2, 1963 Baton Rouge Ole Miss 37 LSU 3 LSU 28–22–2
October 31, 1964 Baton Rouge LSU 11 Ole Miss 10 LSU 29-22-2
October 30, 1965 Jackson Ole Miss 23 LSU 0 LSU 29–23–2
October 29, 1966 Baton Rouge Ole Miss 17 LSU 0 LSU 29–24–2
November 29, 1967 Jackson Ole Miss 13 LSU 13 LSU 29–24–3
November 2, 1968 Baton Rouge Ole Miss 27 LSU 24 LSU 29–25–3
November 1, 1969 Jackson Ole Miss 26 LSU 23 LSU 29–26–3
December 5, 1970 Baton Rouge LSU 61 Ole Miss 17 LSU 30–26–3
October 30, 1971 Jackson Ole Miss 24 LSU 22 LSU 30–27–3
November 4, 1972 Baton Rouge LSU 17 Ole Miss 16 LSU 31–27–3
November 3, 1973 Jackson LSU 51 Ole Miss 14 LSU 32–27–3
November 2, 1974 Baton Rouge LSU 24 Ole Miss 0 LSU 33–27–3
November 1, 1975 Jackson Ole Miss 24 LSU 13 LSU 33–28–3
October 30, 1976 Baton Rouge LSU 45 Ole Miss 0 LSU 34–28–3
October 29, 1977 Jackson LSU 28 Ole Miss 21 LSU 35–28–3
November 4, 1978 Baton Rouge LSU 30 Ole Miss 8 LSU 36–28–3
November 3, 1979 Jackson LSU 28 Ole Miss 24 LSU 37–28–3
November 1, 1980 Baton Rouge LSU 38 Ole Miss 16 LSU 38–28–3
October 31, 1981 Jackson Ole Miss 27 LSU 27 LSU 38–28–4
October 30, 1982 Baton Rouge LSU 45 Ole Miss 8 LSU 39–28–4
October 29, 1983 Jackson Ole Miss 27 LSU 24 LSU 39–29–4
November 3, 1984 Baton Rouge LSU 32 Ole Miss 29 LSU 40–29–4
November 2, 1985 Jackson LSU 14 Ole Miss 0 LSU 41–29–4
November 1, 1986 Baton Rouge Ole Miss 21 LSU 19 LSU 41-30–4
October 31, 1987 Jackson LSU 42 Ole Miss 13 LSU 42–30–4
October 29, 1988 Baton Rouge LSU 31 Ole Miss 20 LSU 43–30–4
November 4, 1989 Oxford LSU 35 Ole Miss 30 LSU 44–30–4
November 3, 1990 Baton Rouge Ole Miss 19 LSU 10 LSU 44–31–4
November 2, 1991 Jackson LSU 25 Ole Miss 22 LSU 45–31–4
October 31, 1992 Jackson Ole Miss 32 LSU 0 LSU 45–32–4
October 30, 1993 Baton Rouge LSU 19 Ole Miss 17 LSU 46–32–4
October 29, 1994 Oxford Ole Miss 34 LSU 21 LSU 46–33–4
November 11, 1995 Baton Rouge LSU 38 Ole Miss 9 LSU 47–33–4
November 16, 1996 Oxford LSU 39 Ole Miss 7 LSU 48–33-4
November 26, 1997 Baton Rouge Ole Miss 36 LSU 21 LSU 48-34–4
October 31, 1998 Oxford Ole Miss 37 LSU 31 LSU 48–35–4
October 30, 1999 Baton Rouge Ole Miss 42 LSU 23 LSU 48–36–4
November 11, 2000 Oxford LSU 20 Ole Miss 9 LSU 49–36-4
October 27, 2001 Baton Rouge Ole Miss 35 LSU 24 LSU 49-37–4
November 23, 2002 Baton Rouge #21 LSU 14 Ole Miss 13 LSU 50–37–4
November 22, 2003 Oxford #3 LSU 17 #15 Ole Miss 14 LSU 51-37–4
November 20, 2004 Baton Rouge #14 LSU 27 Ole Miss 24 LSU 52–37–4
November 19, 2005 Oxford #4 LSU 40 Ole Miss 7 LSU 53–37–4
November 18, 2006 Baton Rouge #9 LSU 23 Ole Miss 20 LSU 54–37–4
November 17, 2007 Oxford #1 LSU 41 Ole Miss 24 LSU 55–37–4
November 22, 2008 Baton Rouge Ole Miss 31 #18 LSU 13 LSU 55–38–4
November 21, 2009 Oxford Ole Miss 25 #10 LSU 23 LSU 55–39–4
November 20, 2010 Baton Rouge #5 LSU 43 Ole Miss 36 LSU 56–39–4
November 19, 2011 Oxford #1 LSU 52 Ole Miss 3 LSU 57–39–4
November 17, 2012 Baton Rouge #7 LSU 41 Ole Miss 35 LSU 58–39–4
October 19, 2013 Oxford Ole Miss 27 #6 LSU 24 LSU 58–40–4
October 25, 2014 Baton Rouge #24 LSU 10 #3 Ole Miss 7 LSU 59–40–4

Notable games[edit]

Magnolia Bowl Trophy
  • 1959 – Cannon's Halloween Run — Late in the game between #1 LSU and #3 Ole Miss, LSU was trailing 0–3. Then Billy Cannon returned a punt 89 yards for a TD, breaking seven tackles. The Rebels then drove down the field but were stopped on the LSU 1-yard line as the game ended resulting in a 7–3 victory for LSU in Tiger Stadium. The Rebels would get revenge however in the Sugar Bowl by whipping the Bayou Bengals 21–0 and were declared national champions by several polls.
  • 1972 – Jones to Davis;. "The Night The Clock Stopped" -- #6 LSU survived an upset bid from unranked Ole Miss in Tiger Stadium by winning the game on a TD pass from QB Bert Jones to RB Brad Davis. Ole Miss fans say the 1972 contest featured a few seconds of free football. The Tigers trailed the Rebels 16–10 with four seconds to play and the ball on the Ole Miss ten-yard line. After a short incompletion by Jones to Jimmy LeDoux at the goal line, the game clock still showed one second remaining. The Tigers used the precious second to win the game on the "last play," 17–16. The home-clock advantage inspired a sign at the Louisiana state line reading, "You are now entering Louisiana. Set your clocks back four seconds."
  • 1989 – The 1989 contest in Oxford, the first visit by LSU to the Ole Miss campus since 1960, proved to have a much different flavor than most college football games. One week earlier, Rebels safety Chucky Mullins suffered a career-ending (and ultimately, fatal) injury making a tackle vs. Vanderbilt. The student body passed buckets around the stadium to a then record crowd of 42,700 at Vaught-Hemingway Stadium. In excess of $150,000 dollars was raised for the Mullins fund. A very emotional and passionate crowd watched as the Rebels nearly pulled off a miraculous comeback of 21 points against the 1–6 Tigers, only to have the ball intercepted in the end zone in the waning seconds, allowing LSU to hold on for a 35–30 victory.
  • 1997 – The Rebels upset then #7 LSU 36–21 one week after the Tigers shocked the then top-ranked Florida Gators. It would spark a three-game winning streak against the Tigers, including a thrilling overtime victory in 1998 (37–31).
  • 2003 – Ole Miss entered the game an undefeated 6–0 in SEC conference play while LSU entered the game with only a loss to Florida. The winner of this game would represent the SEC West in the SEC Championship Game in Atlanta. If Ole Miss won, they would be the outright SEC West champion and make the SEC Championship game for the first time. If LSU won, both teams would be SEC West co-champions but LSU would go to Atlanta due to the head-to-head victory tiebreaker. LSU won the game, which was played before the then all-time record crowd to ever watch an on-campus football game in Mississippi. LSU then went on to win both the SEC championship in Atlanta and the BCS national championship.
  • 2008 – Ole Miss beat #18 LSU 31–13 in Baton Rouge to snap a 6-game losing streak to LSU and to win the first Magnolia Bowl trophy.
  • 2009 – With 9 seconds remaining, down by 2 (25–23) on 4th and 26, LSU completes a 40-yard pass to the Ole Miss 6, and left one second on the clock. However, with no timeouts, they simply did not have enough time to execute any sort of play as time expired before LSU could even get off a snap. Oddly enough, LSU was attempting to spike the ball. Ole Miss prevailed for their first win at home against LSU since 1998.
  • 2011 – LSU and Zack Mettenberger mercy kneel the ball on the Ole Miss one yard line with 5 minutes and 10 seconds left on the clock in the fourth quarter. Final score: 52–3[2]
  • 2013 – LSU came into Oxford ranked #6 facing an unranked Ole Miss team that had lost their last 3 games. Buoyed by 3 Zach Mettenberger interceptions, however, Ole Miss took a 17–0 lead a third of the way into the third quarter. LSU would then take advantage of numerous Ole Miss miscues and, following a blocked Andrew Ritter field goal and a 4th and long conversion, tied the game at 24 via a Mettenberger touchdown pass to wide receiver Jarvis Landry. But Ole Miss quarterback Bo Wallace would lead a drive that brought the Rebels to the LSU 24 and was highlighted by two 3rd down conversions in Ole Miss territory. Ritter redeemed himself with a 41 yard field goal with 2 seconds left, putting Ole Miss up 27–24 for good. The win gave Ole Miss their first victory over LSU since 2009.
  • 2014 - Undefeated #3 Ole Miss came into Death Valley facing the 6-2 #24 LSU Tigers. Early in the game LSU had multiple chances to put points on the board, but failed to do so, missing a 29 yard field goal and fumbling the ball on the goaline. Ole Miss struck first with a late first quarter touchdown, but LSU's young defense stepped up big and did not allow Ole Miss to score another point. LSU's offense shot themselves in the foot against one of the best defenses in the country, fumbling twice and throwing two interceptions. At half Ole Miss lead 7-3, mid-way through the 4th quarter LSU was given the ball at their own 5 yard-line. LSU would run the ball 12 straight times on the backs of Leonard Fournette and Kenny Hilliard, but it would be Anthony Jennings who threw a 3 yard touchdown pass to TE Logan Stokes, his first catch of his career, to take the lead 10-7. Ole Miss was given another chance to win the game, Bo Wallace converted multiple times on 3rd and 4th down to drive Ole Miss down the field. With 9 seconds left Ole Miss had the ball on LSU's 25, and prepared to send out the kicker for a 42 yard field goal; however, due to a delay of game penalty the ball was moved to the 30. Ole Miss kept their freshman kicker on the field, but when LSU head coach Les Miles called a timeout Ole Miss sent Bo Wallace and the offense back onto the field. Instead of attempting a short pass to the sidelines, Bo Wallace threw an under-thrown ball to the endzone where it was intercepted by Senior Safety Ronald Martin. LSU won the game 10-7 and ended Ole Miss's undefeated season and possible shot to go to the first annual College Football Playoffs.


See also[edit]

References[edit]