Mahajati Sadan

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Mahajati Sadan
মহাজাতি সদন
General information
Status Active
Address 166,Chittaranjan Avenue, Kolkata 700007
Town or city Kolkata
Country India
Inaugurated 19 August 1939
Owner West Bengal Government

Mahajati Sadan is an auditorium located in Chittaranjan Avenue, Kolkata, West Bengal, India.[1] This auditorium is regularly used for Bengali theatres. Seminars are also organized in the seminal hall of Mahajati Sadan. This auditorium was an important part of India's freedom movement.[2] Rabindranath Tagore called this auditorium "House of the Nation".[3]

History[edit]

Subhas Chandra Bose made a request to Rabindranath Tagore to create an auditorium and in response to the request of Bose, Tagore laid the foundation stone of Mahajati Sadan 19 August 1939. At the foundation-laying ceremony of Mahajati Sadan, Tagore told in his speech:[3]

Today we assemble here to witness the beginning of the fulfilment of a long cherished dream. Those who for years have toiled ans suffered – laboured and sacrificed – so that India may be free, have long wished an abode to provide shelter an protection for their activities and to serve as a visible symbol of their hopes and ideal-dreams and aspirations. More than once has the attempt been made to give us the home that we have wanted, but it has failed and it has been left to you to lay the foundation stone of the 'House of Nation'

But, sudden disappearance of Bose stopped the construction work of this building. After independence of India, Bidhan Chandra Roy showed his interest to complete the construction work of this building and thus "Mahajati Sadan Act 1949" was enacted for completion of the construction.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Mahajati Sadan". West Bengal Government. Retrieved 2 July 2012. 
  2. ^ "Mahajati Sadan auditorium". Retrieved 2 July 2012. 
  3. ^ a b Subhas Chandra Bose (1 October 2004). The Alternative Leadership: Speeches, Articles, Statements and Letters, June 1939-January 1941. Orient Blackswan. pp. 8–. ISBN 978-81-7824-104-3. Retrieved 2 July 2012.