Mahmoud Fawzi

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Not to be confused with Mohamed Fawzi. ‹See Tfd›

Mahmoud Fawzi (Arabic: محمود فوزى‎, IPA: [mæħˈmuːd ˈfæwzi]) (19 September 1900 - 12 June 1981)[1] was an Egyptian diplomat and political figure of Circassian origin, .

Biography[edit]

Fawzi was born in a village near Quwaysina (Minufiyya).[1] His father was a graduate of Dar al'Ulum and the Shari'a Judges School.[1] He studied law at the University of Cairo. He did his postgraduate studies at the Universities of Liverpool, Columbia, and Rome, and received a PhD in criminal law in 1926.[1]

He served in many diplomatic posts as a young man, including Egyptian Consul in the Egyptian Consulate in Kobe, Japan, in the early 1930s, beginning in 1926. In 1942 he was appointed Egyptian consul-general in Jerusalem. He became Egyptian representative to the United Nations in 1947 and ambassador to the United Kingdom in 1952.[2] In late 1952 he became foreign minister of Egypt under its new leader, Gamal Abdel Nasser.[3] Fawzi was appointed largely because of his fluency in languages, and was known to avoid involvement in politics, always remaining a diplomat.

Fawzi served as foreign minister of Egypt until 1958 when the United Arab Republic, a union between Egypt and Syria was formed. Fawzi served as foreign minister of the United Arab Republic until its collapse in 1961. He remained in office until 1964. After that he remained a close advisor to Nasser on foreign affairs. Upon Nasser's death in 1970, Fawzi was appointed prime minister by his successor, Anwar Sadat, as a compromise civilian candidate.[4] Fawzi served as prime minister until January 1972 and then served as vice-president of Egypt until his retirement in 1974. He wrote a book entitled "Suez War" about the 1956 crisis with Israel over the Suez Canal and it was published after his death in 1981.[1]

References[edit]

General
Specific
  1. ^ a b c d e Arthur Goldschmidt Jr. (1999). Biographical Dictionary of Modern Egypt. Boulder, CO: L. Reinner. p. 35. Retrieved 4 September 2013.   – via Questia (subscription required)
  2. ^ "Former Heads of the Egyptian Mission to the UK since 1924". Egyptian Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Retrieved 25 February 2010. 
  3. ^ "Former Ministers". Egyptian Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Retrieved 25 February 2010. 
  4. ^ "Former Prime Ministers". Cabinet of Ministers. Retrieved 25 February 2010. 
Diplomatic posts
Preceded by
Amr Pasha
Ambassador of Egypt to the United Kingdom
1952
Succeeded by
Abdel Rahman Hakky
Political offices
Preceded by
Ahmed Farag Tayei
Foreign Minister of Egypt
1952 – 1964
Succeeded by
Mahmoud Riad
Vacant
Title last held by
Gamal Abdel Nasser
Prime Minister of Egypt
1970 – 1972
Succeeded by
Aziz Sedki