Maia Shibutani

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Maia Shibutani
2011 Four Continents Maia SHIBUTANI Alex SHIBUTANI P.jpg
The Shibutanis in 2011.
Personal information
Full name Maia Harumi Shibutani
Country represented  United States
Born (1994-07-20) July 20, 1994 (age 20)
New York City
Residence Ann Arbor, Michigan
Height 1.55 m (5 ft 1 in)
Partner Alex Shibutani
Coach Marina Zueva
Former coach Igor Shpilband, Patti Gottwein, Rich Griffin, Damon Allen, Erik Schulz
Choreographer Marina Zueva
Former choreographer Igor Shpilband
Skating club SC of New York
Training locations Canton, Michigan
Former training locations Colorado Springs, Colorado
Began skating 1998
World standing 4 (As of 21 April 2012)[1]
Season's bests 9 (2012–13)[2]
8 (2011–12)[3]
4 (2010–11)[4]
15 (2009–10)[5]
19 (2008–09)[6]
ISU personal best scores
Combined total 163.79
2011 Worlds
Short dance 66.88
2011 Worlds
Free dance 96.91
2011 Worlds

Maia Harumi Shibutani[7] (born July 20, 1994) is an American ice dancer. With her brother Alex Shibutani, she is the 2011 World bronze medalist, 2011 Four Continents silver medalist, 2011 NHK Trophy champion, 2009 World Junior silver medalist, and a four-time U.S. national medalist. She competed at the 2014 Winter Olympics.

Personal life[edit]

Maia Shibutani was born to Chris and Naomi Shibutani, who met as Harvard musicians.[8] She lived in Colorado Springs from 2005 through 2007. She moved to Ann Arbor, Michigan in 2007.

Maia Shibutani was originally home-schooled.[8] She graduated from Huron High School in Ann Arbor in 2012. She entered the University of Michigan in the fall of 2012.

Career[edit]

Early career[edit]

Maia Shibutani began skating at age four.[9] She originally trained as a single skater and tested up to the juvenile level in singles. In March 2003, she and her family attended the World Championships in Washington D.C. Her brother said, "We were seated close to the ice in the second row, and when the ice dancers came out for their warm up, we could actually feel a gust of wind as the skaters flew by. We were so impressed with the artistry, skating quality, and speed of the top teams that we decided to give it a try."[9]

Maia and Alex Shibutani teamed up to compete in ice dancing in the spring of 2004.[9] Their singles coach, Kathy Bird, arranged for them to work with their first dancing coaches Andy Stroukoff and Susie Kelley.[10] The Shibutanis also worked with Mary Marchiselli. During their juvenile season, their programs were choreographed by Josh Babb.

During the 2004–2005 season, their first season of competition, they competed on the juvenile level, which is the lowest competitive level in the U.S. Figure Skating testing structure. They competed at the 2005 North Atlantic Regional Championships, the qualifying competition for the U.S. Junior Championships, and won the competition.[11] The win qualified them for the 2005 U.S. Junior Championships. At that competition, they placed second in the first compulsory dance, fourth in the second compulsory dance, and third in the free dance. They won the silver medal overall.[12]

After moving up to the Intermediate level following the 2004–2005 season and performing well at the non-qualifying competitions, the Shibutanis went to Colorado Springs, Colorado to work with choreographer Tom Dickson. During that off-season, they were being coached by Judy Blumberg on the east coast. After doing better than expected at the Lake Placid Ice Dance Competition in the summer of 2005, the Shibutanis decided to move coaching centers to a better training environment and so moved to train in Colorado Springs under head coach Patti Gottwein.[8][10] During that time, they also worked with Rich Griffin, Damon Allen and Eric Schulz.

In the 2005–2006 season, they moved up to the Intermediate level. The Shibutanis won the Southwestern Regional Championships, their qualifying competition for the 2006 U.S Junior Championships.[13] At the 2006 U.S. Junior Championships, they placed second in the first compulsory dance and then won the second compulsory and free dances to win the title overall.[14] They worked as guest bloggers and aides for the media staff for U.S. Figure Skating at the 2006 U.S. Championships,[15] and again at the 2006 Four Continents, which were held in Colorado Springs.[16]

In the 2006–2007 season, they moved up to the novice level, which is the first and lowest of three levels that compete at the U.S. Championships. At the 2007 Midwestern Sectional Championships, their qualifying competition for the national championships, the Shibutanis competed under the ISU Judging System for the first time. They placed second in the first compulsory dance and then won the second compulsory and the free dances to win the competition overall and qualify for the 2007 U.S. Championships.[17] At Nationals, the Shibutanis placed second in both compulsory dances and then won the free dance to win the novice gold medal by a margin of victory of 2.06 points ahead of silver medalists Sara Bailey & Kyle Herring.[18] This was their second consecutive national title.[19]

Following the 2007 U.S. Championships, the Shibutanis changed coaches to Igor Shpilband and Marina Zueva in Canton, Michigan.[10] One factor in the decision to change coaches was the issue of university for Alex Shibutani, who at the time of the coaching change, had two years left of high school and was considering his university options.[20]

Junior career[edit]

The Shibutanis perform a lift at the 2008–2009 Junior Grand Prix Final

In the 2007–2008 season, the Shibutanis moved up to the junior level nationally. However, they were unable to compete internationally on the junior level because Maia was not yet old enough. At the 2008 Midwestern Sectionals, the Shibutanis placed fourth in the compulsory dance and then third in the original and free dances to win the bronze medal overall. This medal qualified them for the 2008 U.S. Championships. At Nationals, they placed 7th in the compulsory dance, 2nd in the original dance, and 4th in the free dance. They placed 4th overall, winning the pewter medal.

Alex & Maia Shibutani with coaches Igor Shpilband and Marina Zueva in 2008.

In the 2008–2009 season, Maia became age-eligible for the international junior circuit. The Shibutanis made their junior international debut on the ISU Junior Grand Prix. At their first event, the 2008–2009 ISU Junior Grand Prix event in Courchevel, France, they placed second in the compulsory dance and then won the original and free dances to win the gold medal overall by a margin of victory of 11.00 points over silver medalists Kharis Ralph and Asher Hill.[21] They were then assigned to their second event, the event in Madrid, Spain. At this event, they placed second in all three segments of the competition and won the silver medal, placing 4.24 points behind champions Ekaterina Riazanova and Jonathan Guerreiro.[22] These two medals qualified them for the 2008–2009 ISU Junior Grand Prix Final, for which they were the third-ranked qualifiers.[23] Qualifying for the event had also qualified them for the 2009 U.S. Championships.

The Junior Grand Prix Final was being held concurrently with the senior final for the first time and so did not have a compulsory dance segment. The Shibutanis placed 7th in the original dance, 4.79 points behind original dance leaders Madison Chock & Greg Zuerlein.[24] The Shibutanis placed 3rd in the free dance.[25] They placed 4th overall.[26]

The Shibutanis went on to the 2009 U.S. Championships, where they competed on the junior level for the second consecutive year. At the event, the Shibutanis placed second in the compulsory dance,[27] the original dance,[28] and the free dance.[29] They won the silver medal, placing 6.78 points behind Chock and Zuerlein.[30] This was their fifth consecutive medal at a national-level competition. Following the competition, the Shibutanis were named to the team to the 2009 World Junior Championships.[31]

At Junior Worlds, the Shibutanis placed 5th in the compulsory dance, 4th in the original dance, and 2nd in the free dance. They won the silver medal, placing 10.40 points behind Chock and Zuerlein.[32]

In the 2009–2010 season, the Shibutanis won both their junior Grand Prix events and won the bronze medal at the Junior Grand Prix Final. They again skated at the junior level at US Nationals, which they won. At 2010 Junior Worlds, they finished off the podium in fourth place. This was their final junior event.

Senior career[edit]

The Shibutanis at the 2011 Worlds

2010–2011 season[edit]

In the 2010–2011 season, the Shibutanis moved to the senior level. They finished fifth at the 2010 Nebelhorn Trophy, moving up from eighth after the short dance with a strong free dance showing.[33] They won the bronze medal at both the 2010 NHK Trophy and the 2010 Skate America, making them the first dance team to medal at both Grand Prix events in its first senior season. They were the first alternates for the Grand Prix final.[34]

The Shibutanis finished second at U.S. Nationals and were chosen to compete at the Four Continents and World Championships. They won the silver medal at Four Continents. At the World Championships, they were in fourth after the short dance, 4.09 points behind third-placed Nathalie Péchalat / Fabian Bourzat. In the free dance, they scored 4.34 ahead of Pechalat and Bourzat, both of whom had fallen. The Shibutanis finished third overall by 0.25 points and won a bronze in their World Championships debut, a feat not even Virtue and Moir, the current Olympic Champions had accomplished.

2011–2012 season[edit]

The Shibutanis started their 2011–2012 season with a silver medal at the 2011 Finlandia Trophy.

For the Grand Prix season, the Shibutanis were assigned to the 2011 Cup of China and 2011 NHK Trophy. They placed 2nd at the Cup of China. A week later they placed 1st at the NHK Trophy, edging Kaitlyn Weaver and Andrew Poje for gold by .09 points. It was the Shibutanis' first senior Grand Prix title. Their combined results qualified them for the Grand Prix Final.[35]

The Shibutanis finished 4th at the 2012 Four Continents and 8th at the 2012 World Championships.

Invited by Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, the Shibutanis attended a dinner in honor of Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda on May 1, 2012 in Washington, D.C.[36]

Following Igor Shpilband's dismissal from the Arctic Edge Arena in June 2012, the Shibutanis decided to remain at the rink with Marina Zoueva and ended their collaboration with Shpilband.[37]

2012–2013 season[edit]

The Shibutanis started their season at the 2012 Rostelecom Cup where they were third in the short dance. They paused their free dance for half a minute due to Alex pulling a muscle in his thigh. They were allowed to continue from the point of interruption and finished 4th overall behind Russian ice dancers Victoria Sinitsina / Ruslan Zhiganshin. They won the bronze medal at their next event, the 2012 NHK Trophy. The Shibutanis also took bronze at the 2013 U.S. Championships.[38] They then competed at the 2013 Four Continents and finished 4th behind Madison Chock / Evan Bates.

2013–2014 season[edit]

The Shibutanis won the bronze medal at the 2014 U.S. Championships and were named in the U.S. team to the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia. They placed ninth at the Olympics.[39]

Programs[edit]

Season Short dance Free dance Exhibition
2013–2014
[7][39]
  • Foxtrot
    by Michael Buble
  • Quickstep
    by Michael Buble
  • Foxtrot
    by Michael Buble
  • Wanna Be Startin' Somethin'
    by Michael Jackson
  • Ben
    by Walter Scharf
  • Thriller
    by Michael Jackson
2012–2013
[40][41]
  • March: Ojos Azul
    by Incantations
  • Waltz: Dolencias
    by Incantations
  • Polka: Sikureada
    by Incantations

Earlier:[42]

  • Waltz: Mary Poppins Overture
    by Richard and Robert Sherman
  • Polka: Mary Poppins Overture
    by Richard and Robert Sherman
2011–2012
[43]
  • Samba: Batuca
    by DJ Dero
  • Samba: The Girl From Ipanema
    by Olivia
  • Samba: Samba de Janeiro
    by Bellini

Earlier:[44]

  • Batuca
    by DJ Dero
  • Skip to the Bip
    by Club des Belugas
  • Jazz Machine
    by Black Machine
Sun Valley Serenade
by Glenn Miller Orchestra:
2010–2011
[45]

Original dance
2009–2010
[46][47]
  • Itsuka Mata
    by Tetsuro Naito
  • Ao-ki Kaze
    by Ryutaro Kaneko
2008–2009
[48]
  • Japanese Koto music
2007–2008
[47][49]
  • Japanese Kodo music
  • Piano music
    by Jean-Marie Senia
2006–2007
[47][50]

Competitive highlights[edit]

The Shibutanis with the other medalists and their coaches at the 2011 World Championships

(with Alex Shibutani)

Senior results[edit]

International[51]
Event 2010–11 2011–12 2012–13 2013–14 2014–15
Olympics 9th
Worlds 3rd 8th 8th 6th
Four Continents 2nd 4th 4th
Grand Prix Final 5th
GP Cup of China 2nd TBD
GP NHK Trophy 3rd 1st 3rd 3rd
GP Rostelecom 4th
GP Skate America 3rd 3rd TBD
Nebelhorn 5th
Finlandia 2nd
National[47]
U.S. Champ. 2nd 2nd 3rd 3rd
GP = Grand Prix; TBD = Assigned

Junior results[edit]

International[51]
Event 2004–05 2005–06 2006–07 2007–08 2008–09 2009–10
Junior Worlds 2nd 4th
JGP Final 4th 3rd
JGP Croatia 1st
JGP France 1st
JGP Spain 2nd
JGP USA 1st
NACS 2nd N.
National[47]
U.S. Champ. 1st N. 4th J. 2nd J. 1st J.
U.S. Junior Champ. 2nd Jv. 1st I.
Midwestern Sect. 1st N. 3rd J.
Southwestern Reg. 1st I.
North Atlantic Reg. 1st Jv.
Levels: Jv. = Juvenile; I. = Intermediate; N. = Novice; J. = Junior
JGP = Junior Grand Prix

Detailed results[edit]

(with Alex Shibutani)

Senior results[edit]

2013–2014 season
Date Event SD FD Total
March 24–30, 2014 2014 World Championships 6
63.55
6
95.02
6
158.57
February 6–22, 2014 2014 Winter Olympics 9
64.47
10
90.70
9
155.17
January 5–12, 2014 2014 U.S. Championships 3
68.00
3
102.44
3
170.44
November 8–10, 2013 2013 ISU Grand Prix NHK Trophy 3
63.09
3
94.49
3
157.58
October 18–20, 2013 2013 ISU Grand Prix Skate America 3
61.26
3
93.21
3
154.47
2012–2013 season
Date Event SD FD Total
March 11–17, 2013 2013 World Championships 8
66.14
9
91.57
8
157.71
February 8–11, 2013 2013 Four Continents Championships 4
63.26
4
96.71
4
159.97
January 19–27, 2013 2013 U.S. Championships 3
69.63
3
104.58
3
174.21
November 23–25, 2012 2012 ISU Grand Prix NHK Trophy 2
60.84
3
93.72
3
154.56
November 8–11, 2012 2012 ISU Grand Prix Rostelecom Cup 4
58.26
5
82.65
4
140.91
2011–2012 season
Date Event SD FD Total
March 26 – April 1, 2012 2012 World Championships 7
62.35
11
82.37
8
144.72
February 7–12, 2012 2012 Four Continents Championships 4
63.38
4
94.91
4
158.29
January 22–29, 2012 2012 U.S. Championships 2
72.61
2
106.23
2
178.84
December 8–11, 2011 2011–12 Grand Prix Final 5
65.53
5
95.02
5
160.55
November 10–13, 2011 2011 ISU Grand Prix NHK Trophy 3
59.02
1
92.83
1
151.85
November 3–6, 2011 2011 ISU Grand Prix Cup of China 2
57.79
2
90.61
2
148.40
October 6–9, 2011 2011 Finlandia Trophy 2
58.45
2
92.63
2
151.08
2010–2011 season
Date Event SD FD Total
April 24 – May 1, 2011 2011 World Championships 4
66.88
3
96.91
3
163.79
February 15–20, 2011 2011 Four Continents Championships 4
62.04
2
93.34
2
155.38
January 22–30, 2011 2011 U.S. Championships 2
70.47
2
102.71
2
173.18
November 12–14, 2010 2010 ISU Grand Prix Skate America 4
56.46
3
88.35
3
144.81
October 22–24, 2010 2010 ISU Grand Prix NHK Trophy 5
53.68
2
83.25
3
136.93
September 23–26, 2010 2010 Nebelhorn Trophy 8
46.90
2
86.10
5
133.00

References[edit]

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  2. ^ "ISU Judging System – Season Bests Total Scores 2012/2013: Ice Dance". International Skating Union. April 13, 2013. 
  3. ^ "ISU Judging System – Season Bests Total Scores 2011/2012: Ice Dance". International Skating Union. April 21, 2012. Retrieved April 26, 2012. 
  4. ^ "ISU Judging System – Season Bests Total Scores 2010/2011: Ice Dance". International Skating Union. April 30, 2011. Retrieved June 17, 2011. 
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  6. ^ "ISU Judging System – Season Bests Total Scores 2008/2009: Ice Dance". International Skating Union. April 18, 2009. Retrieved June 20, 2011. 
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  8. ^ a b c Borzilleri, Meri-Jo (October 18, 2011). "Shibutanis make ice dancing the family business". ESPN.com. Retrieved October 18, 2011. 
  9. ^ a b c Walker, Elvin (June 20, 2010). "Shibutanis make move to the big leagues". GoldenSkate.com. Retrieved March 28, 2011. 
  10. ^ a b c Mittan, Barry (July 31, 2007). "Skyrocketing Shibutanis". Skate Today. 
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  13. ^ "2006 SOUTHWESTERN REGIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS Intermediate Dance Final Standings". U.S. Figure Skating. 
  14. ^ "2006 U.S. Junior Figure Skating Championships Intermediate Dance Final Standings". U.S. Figure Skating. 
  15. ^ "2006 United States Figure Skating Championships Blogs". U.S. Figure Skating. 
  16. ^ "Belbin & Agosto Increase Lead at Four Continents". U.S. Figure Skating. 
  17. ^ "2007 Midwestern Sectional Championships Novice Dance – Free Dance Final Results". U.S. Figure Skating. 
  18. ^ "2007 State Farm U.S. Figure Skating Championships Novice Dance Result". U.S. Figure Skating. 
  19. ^ Backman, Daphne. "Shibutanis Claim Second Straight U.S. Title with Novice Win". U.S. Figure Skating. 
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  27. ^ "2009 U.S. FIGURE SKATING CHAMPIONSHIPS Junior Dance Compulsory Dance Final Result Details". U.S. Figure Skating. 
  28. ^ "2009 U.S. FIGURE SKATING CHAMPIONSHIPS Junior Dance Original Dance Final Result Details". U.S. Figure Skating. 
  29. ^ "2009 U.S. FIGURE SKATING CHAMPIONSHIPS Junior Dance Free Dance Final Result Details". U.S. Figure Skating. 
  30. ^ "2009 U.S. FIGURE SKATING CHAMPIONSHIPS Junior Dance Final Results". U.S. Figure Skating. 
  31. ^ "U.S. Figure Skating Announces World, Four Continents and World Junior Teams". U.S. Figure Skating. 2009-01-25. 
  32. ^ "ISU World Junior Figure Skating Championships 2009 – Junior Ice Dance Result". International Skating Union. 
  33. ^ Brown, Mickey (September 25, 2010). "Russia leads the way at Nebelhorn Trophy". IceNetwork. 
  34. ^ Brannen, Sarah S.; Meekins, Drew (November 30, 2010). "The Inside Edge with Sarah and Drew – Nov. 30". IceNetwork. 
  35. ^ "Shibutanis claim ice dancing gold at NHK Trophy". IceNetwork. November 12, 2011. Retrieved April 15, 2012. 
  36. ^ Shibutani, Maia; Shibutani, Alex (May 8, 2012). "Shibs rub elbows with dignitaries at D.C. dinner". IceNetwork. 
  37. ^ Barnas, Jo-Ann (June 4, 2012). "U.S. Figure Skating confirms top American teams to stay in Canton after Shpilband dismissal". Detroit Free Press. Archived from the original on June 5, 2012. 
  38. ^ Whiteside, Kelly (February 3, 2013). "On a day to celebrate siblings, skaters work together". USA Today. 
  39. ^ a b "Maia SHIBUTANI". Organizing Committee of the XXII Olympic Winter Games. Archived from the original on April 7, 2014. 
  40. ^ "Maia SHIBUTANI / Alex SHIBUTANI: 2012/2013". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on March 12, 2013. 
  41. ^ Rutherford, Lynn (September 4, 2012). "Memoirs of the Shibutanis: A matured 'Geisha'". IceNetwork. 
  42. ^ "Maia SHIBUTANI / Alex SHIBUTANI: 2012/2013". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on November 2, 2012. 
  43. ^ "Maia SHIBUTANI / Alex SHIBUTANI: 2011/2012". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on June 12, 2012. 
  44. ^ "Maia SHIBUTANI / Alex SHIBUTANI: 2011/2012". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on November 2, 2011. 
  45. ^ "Maia SHIBUTANI / Alex SHIBUTANI: 2010/2011". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on May 19, 2011. 
  46. ^ "Maia SHIBUTANI / Alex SHIBUTANI: 2009/2010". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on September 6, 2009. 
  47. ^ a b c d e "Maia Shibutani / Alex Shibutani". IceNetwork. ; Earlier versions:
  48. ^ "Maia SHIBUTANI / Alex SHIBUTANI: 2008/2009". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on June 11, 2009. 
  49. ^ "2008 Nationals profile" (PDF). Ice-dance.com. Archived from the original on June 3, 2011. 
  50. ^ "2007 U.S. Nationals Profile" (PDF). U.S. Figure Skating. Archived from the original on September 30, 2011. 
  51. ^ a b "Competition Results: Maia SHIBUTANI / Alex SHIBUTANI". International Skating Union. 

External links[edit]