Maillardville

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Notre Dame de Lourdes Church on Laval Square

Maillardville is a community on the south slope of the city of Coquitlam, British Columbia, Canada.

In 1889, Frank Ross and James McLaren opened what would become Fraser Mills, a $350,000, then state-of-the-art lumber mill on the north bank of the Fraser River. By 1908, a mill town of 20 houses, a store, post office, hospital, office block, barber shop, and pool hall had grown around the mill. A mill manager's residence was built that later became Place des Arts.[1] In 1909, Ross and McLaren, in search of workers, recruited a contingent of 110 French Canadian mill workers from Quebec. With the arrival of a second contingent in June 1910, Maillardville was born. Named for Father Edmond Maillard, a young Oblate from France, it became the largest Francophone centre west of Manitoba.[2]

In 1971, the City of Coquitlam and the Village of Fraser Mills were amalgamated, which gave the city a larger tax base. The mill closed in 2001, and is now rezoned into a residential area.[1] Maillardville's past is recognized today in street names, the Francophone education system and French immersion programs, French-language guides and scouts, and celebrations such as Festival du Bois.[3]

Maillardville celebrated its 100th birthday in 2009.[4]

Media[edit]

They Dream, a Canadian feature-length film, set in and around Maillardville, including Place des Arts and Mackin House Museum, was shot over the Summer of 2012. Written and directed by Vancouver filmmaker Gord Stanfield, They Dream is the story of a 20-year-old art student, David Dubois, his love affair with a mysterious woman Lisa Reese, and his tragic past. Jean Ory reminds David he can’t escape the truth. "Lisa and Jean were lifetime residents of Maillardville. They Dream's lead cast includes Jason Mireau, Delia Tatiana and Max Teichman.

Notable people[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Fraser Mills: History Retrieved on 15 February 2009
  2. ^ City of Coquitlam: History and Heritage Retrieved on 15 February 2009
  3. ^ CitySoup.ca: Coquitlam Regional History Retrieved on 15 February 2009
  4. ^ Maillardville100.com: 100 Years of History Retrieved on 22 February 2009

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 49°14′15″N 122°52′01″W / 49.2374°N 122.867°W / 49.2374; -122.867