Maizuru Line

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     Maizuru Line
Special express Maizuru.jpg
A Maizuru limited express services at Higashi-Maizuru Station, July 2005
Overview
Type Heavy rail
Locale Kyoto Prefecture
Termini Ayabe
Higashi-Maizuru
Stations 6
Operation
Opening 1904
Owner JR West
Technical
Line length 26.4 km (16.4 mi)
Track gauge 1,067 mm (3 ft 6 in)
Electrification 1,500 V DC, overhead wire

The Maizuru Line (舞鶴線 Maizuru-sen?) is a 26.4 km (16.4 mi) railway line in Kyoto Prefecture, Japan, operated by the West Japan Railway Company (JR West). It connects Ayabe and Higashi-Maizuru, the line beyond there being called the Obama Line connecting to Tsuruga.

Stations[edit]

  • Local trains stop at every station and rapid ones at the stations merked "S".
Name Japanese Distance
(km)
Rapid Transfers Location
Ayabe 綾部 0.0 S Sanin Main Line Ayabe Kyoto Prefecture
Fuchigaki 淵垣 5.3 S
Umezako 梅迫 8.2 S
Magura 真倉 15.5 | Maizuru
Nishi-Maizuru 西舞鶴 19.5 S Kitakinki Tango Railway Miyazu Line
Higashi-Maizuru 東舞鶴 26.4 S Obama Line

History[edit]

The line opened in the autumn of 1904 to transport troops and materiel to the naval base and Maizuru-Higashi Port during the Russo-Japanese War, which commenced in February of that year.[1] Although built by the Japanese Government, it was initially leased to the Bantsuru Railway Co, which opened the Ayabe - Fukuchiyama section of what is now the Sanin Main Line the same year.

The company was nationalised in 1907, the year the 2 km Maizurukō Line (舞鶴港線?) from Nishi-Maizuru to Maizuru Port opened. Passenger services operated on that branch between 1913 and 1924, and it closed in 1985.

Nishi- Maizuru was also the junction for the 4 km Naka-Maizuru Line (中舞鶴線?) to Naka-Maizuru which operated between 1919 and 1972.[1]

The line was electrified in 1999.[1]

References[edit]

This article incorporates material from the corresponding article in the Japanese Wikipedia

  1. ^ a b c 帰ろう 私たちの故郷へ JR舞鶴線 [JR Maizuru Line - Returning to our hometown]. The Asahi Shimbun Digital (in Japanese). Japan: The Asahi Digital Company. 2 May 2009. Retrieved 12 October 2012.