Makhdoom

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Makhdoom (Arabic: مخدوم‎, meaning one who is served) is an Arabic word meaning "Teacher of Sunnah."[citation needed] It is a title for Pirs, in South and Central Asia.[citation needed]

This title was used by the descendants of Pirs, Quraysh Tribe, politicians and landlords in the in Pakistani provinces of Punjab and Sindh. Hazrat Abbas, a respectable paternal uncle of Muhammad, often visited Mecca and Medina. Muhammad received him and always addressed him with the title Makhdoom.[citation needed] In the Punjab and Sindh provinces of Pakistan, this title was used by some but not others for sacerdotal dignity.[citation needed]

The Makhdoom families were respected in Pakistan mainly due to the role of their ancestors in spreading Islam in the subcontinent.[citation needed] However, a majority of the Makhdoom families are now landlords as well as are involved in national politics and are identified more by these roles. In contemporary politics the Makhdoom 'brand' has secured a large number of provincial and national seats throughout Pakistan and hold great power in the Parliament.

A Makhdoom was a respected person who dedicated his life to Islam, the Quran and the Sunnah.[citation needed] However, at present this title is commonly used by modern Pakistani politicians, landlords and Pirs who are unafilliated with Islam.

The term "Makhdoom" is used synonymously in reference to the Banu Makhzum sub-clan of the Quraysh tribe. In 617 the leaders of the Banu Makhzum clan, such as Amr ibn Hishām, declared a public boycott against Banu Hashim in order to pressure Banu Hashim to withdraw it's protection for Muhammad. Meccan boycott of the Hashemites