Malaya and British Borneo dollar

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Malaya and British Borneo dollar
Ringgit (Malay)
رڠڬيت (Malay)
Malaya&BritishBorneo 1Dollars front 1959.jpg
Malaya & British Borneo $1 note issued in 1959
Central bank Malayan and British Borneo Board of Commissioners of Currency
Bank Negara Malaysia
User(s) Malaya, Singapore, Brunei, North Borneo and Sarawak
Subunit
 1/100 cent
Symbol $
Coins 1, 5, 10, 20, 50 cents
Banknotes 1, 5, 10, 50, 100, 1000, 10,000 dollars

The Malaya and British Borneo dollar (known as the ringgit in Malay, Jawi: رڠڬيت) was the currency of Malaya, Singapore, Sarawak, North Borneo, Brunei and Riau archipelago from 1953 to 1967. The currency was issued by the Board of Commissioners of Currency, Malaya and British Borneo. Prior to 1952, the board was known as the Board of Commissioners of Currency, Malaya.

The Malaya and British Borneo dollar was used in Malaya after independence in 1957, and in Malaysia after its formation in 1963, as well as in Singapore after its independence in 1965. After 1967, the two countries and Brunei ended the common currency arrangement and began issuing their own currencies. However, the Malaya and British Borneo dollar continued to be legal tender until 16 January 1969. The currency was also being used in the Riau Archipelago in Indonesia prior to 1963.

History[edit]

Board of Commissioners of Currency Malaya and British Borneo[edit]

The Currency Ordinance No. 44 of 1952 of the Crown Colony of Singapore, No. 33 of 1951 of the Federation of Malaya, No. 10 of 1951 of North Borneo and No. 1 of 1951 of Sarawak implemented an agreement between those governments and the State of Brunei for the establishment of a Board of Commissioners of Currency to be the sole issuing authority in British Malaya and British Borneo.

This agreement became effective on 1 January 1952. The Board consisted of five members:

  1. Financial Secretary of Singapore who was also the Chairman of the Board
  2. Minister of Finance for the Federation of Malaya
  3. Governor of Sarawak
  4. Governor of North Borneo
  5. British Resident of Brunei
  6. and two further appointed by agreement of the participating governments.

End of common currency[edit]

On 12 June 1967, the currency union came to an end and Malaysia, Singapore and Brunei each began issuing their own currencies. The currencies of the three countries were interchangeable at par value under the Interchangeability Agreement until 8 May 1973 when the Malaysian government decided to terminate it. Brunei and Singapore continue with the Agreement until the present day.[1]

The Board of Commissioners of Currency Malaya and British Borneo was officially wound up on November 30, 1979.[2]

Coins[edit]

Coins were available in 1 (square coins issued between 1953 and 1961, circular coins from 1962), 5, 10, 20, and 50 cents.

Banknotes[edit]

1953 series[edit]

All notes bear the date 21 March 1953, and signed by W.C. Taylor, the Chairman of the Board of Commissioner of Currency. The 1, 5 and 10 dollar notes were printed by Waterlow and Sons, the 50 and 100 dollar notes were printed by Bradbury, Wilkinson & Co. Ltd. and the 1,000 and 10,000 dollar notes were printed by Thomas de la Rue & Co. Ltd.. As a safeguard against forgery, a broken security thread and the watermark of a lion's head were incorporated in the paper before printing.

1953 Series
Image Value Main Colour Description Date of issue
Obverse Reverse Obverse Reverse
$1 $1 $1 Blue/pink Elizabeth II State emblems of the Federation of Malaya and its constituent components, Singapore, North Borneo, Sarawak and Brunei 21 March 1953
$5 $5 $5 Green/yellow
$10 $10 Red/green
$50 $50 $50 Blue/green
$100 $100 $100 Violet/pink
$1000 $1000 $1000 purple/yellow
$10000 $10000 $10,000 green/multicoloured

1959 series[edit]

1959 Series
Image Value Main Colour Description Date of issue
Obverse Reverse Obverse Reverse
$1 $1 $1 Blue/green Sail boat State emblem of the Federation of Malaya, Singapore, North Borneo, Sarawak and Brunei; scene of fishermen returning from sea 1 March 1959
$10 $5 $10 Red/grey Farmer ploughing padi field with buffalo State emblem of the Federation of Malaya, Singapore, North Borneo, Sarawak and Brunei 1 March 1961

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Currency History of Singapore". Monetary Authority of Singapore. 2007-04-09. Retrieved 2010-11-21. 
  2. ^ "History of Money in Malaysia: Colonial Notes & Coins". Bank Negara Malaysia. 2010. Retrieved 2010-11-21. 

Other references[edit]

External links[edit]

Preceded by:
Sarawak dollar (post-WWII)
Reason: Creation of a common currency board
Ratio: at par, or 8.57 dollars = 1 British pound
Currency of Sarawak
1953 – 1963
Currency of Malaysia
1963 – 1967
Succeeded by:
Malaysian dollar
Location: Malaysia
Reason: End of common currency board
Ratio: at par, or 8.57 ringgit = 1 British pound
Preceded by:
British North Borneo dollar (post-WWII)
Reason: Creation of a common currency board
Ratio: at par, or 8.57 dollars = 1 British pound
Currency of British North Borneo
1953 – 1963
Preceded by:
Malayan dollar (post-WWII)
Reason: Creation of a common currency board
Ratio: at par, or 60 dollars = 7 British pounds, about 8.57 dollars = 1 British pound
Currency of Malaya
1953 – 1963
Currency of Singapore
1953 – 1963
Currency of Malaysia
1963 – 1965
Currency of Singapore
1965 – 1967
Succeeded by:
Singapore dollar
Location: Singapore
Reason: End of common currency board
Ratio: at par, or 8.57 dollars = 1 British pound
Currency of Brunei
1953 – 1967
Succeeded by:
Brunei dollar
Reason: End of common currency board
Ratio: at par, or 8.57 dollars = 1 British pound
Currency of Riau Archipelago
1953 – 1963
Succeeded by:
Riau rupiah
Location: Riau Archipelago
Reason: To create a common currency in Indonesia
Ratio: at par, or 8.57 Riau rupiah= 1 British pound