Malcolm Baker

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For the Australian spree killer, see Malcolm George Baker.
Malcolm Baker
Residence Flag of the United States.svg USA
Nationality Flag of the United States.svg American
Fields Finance
Institutions Harvard Business School (2000-)
Harvard University (1998-2000)
Alma mater Harvard University (Ph.D.)
Cambridge University (M.Phil.)
Brown University (B.A.)
Known for 1991 Outstanding Male Athlete (Brown University)
1992 Olympic Rower
Notable awards Brattle Prize

Malcolm P. Baker, Ph.D. is a professor of finance, and a former Olympic rower.

Scholar athlete[edit]

Baker began rowing at Brown University. As a Freshman he was on a National Championship team[1] and he became the 1991 Outstanding Male Athlete. He also earned a bachelor's degree in applied mathematics and economics at Brown in 1992.[2] He raced for the United States National Rowing Team in the 1990 and 1991 World Championships and the 1992 Summer Olympics. At the Olympics his eight-man team finished fourth.[3] Baker earned a M.Phil. in finance from the University of Cambridge in 1993, and a Ph.D. in business economics from Harvard University in 2000.[2] At Cambridge, he helped the crew team defeat University of Oxford in The Boat Race for only the second time in eighteen contests.[1]

Professional career[edit]

Prior to graduate study he was a senior associate at Charles River Associates,[2] and during graduate study he served as a teaching fellow at Harvard University. He has been on the faculty at the Harvard Business School since earning his Ph.D. in 2000.[4] He was an assistant professor from 2001 to 2004, associate professor from 2004 to 2007 and has been a full professor since.[5]

As a professor he has written numerous case studies and has been widely published.[4] He has served as associate editor for the Journal of Finance and the Review of Financial Studies.[4] During his career he has been a three-time Brattle Prize nominee and a two-time Smith Breeden Prize nominee. In 2002, "Market Timing and Capital Structure" (co-authored with Jeffrey Wurgler) was recognized with the Brattle Prize by the American Finance Association as the best corporate finance research paper published in the Journal of Finance that year.[6] In that same year, he and co-author Jeremy Stein, attributed low abnormal returns following high liquidity to the "dumb investor effect."[7] Baker also serves as a faculty research fellow in the corporate finance program at the National Bureau of Economic Research. He has served as an independent director of Board of Directors of TAL International Group, Inc. and of each of its US subsidiaries since September 12, 2006,[2] and he is a consultant for Acadian Asset Management.[4] For his work as a co-author (with Lubomir Litov, Jessica A. Wachter, and Jeffrey Wurgler) of "Can Mutual Fund Managers Pick Stocks? Evidence from Their Trades Prior to Earnings Announcements" in the October 2010 Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, he earned the William F. Sharpe Award for Best Paper in 2011 for his paper.[4]

Personal[edit]

As of February 2004, Baker was married with a 3-year-old child and a 10-month-old child.[1]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Khan, Jamil (2004-02-02). "On-Campus Interview Series: A Baker Scholar". Harbus. Retrieved 2008-05-13. 
  2. ^ a b c d "FORM 8-K". TAL International Group, Inc. 2006-09-12. Retrieved 2008-05-13. 
  3. ^ "U.S. Team Members: B". Friends of Rowing History. 2001. Retrieved 2008-05-13. 
  4. ^ a b c d e "Malcolm P. Baker: Professor of Business Administration: Biography". President and Fellows of Harvard College. Retrieved 2008-05-13. 
  5. ^ "Malcolm Baker". Harvard Business School. 2012-10-22. Retrieved 2013-03-14. 
  6. ^ "Abstracts of Brattle Prize Winning Papers (2003)". American Finance Association. Retrieved 2008-05-13. 
  7. ^ Mandel, Michael J. (2002-04-08). "Economic Trends". Businessweek. The McGraw-Hill Companies Inc. Retrieved 2008-05-13. 

External links[edit]