Malcolm C. Smith

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Professor Malcolm C. Smith FREng FIEEE
Nationality British
Fields control engineering
Institutions University of Cambridge; Ohio State University
Alma mater University of Cambridge
Thesis A Generalised Nyquist/Root-Locus Theory for Multi-Loop Feedback Systems (1982)
Known for contributions to feedback control and systems theory
Notable awards FREng; FIEEE
Website
www.eng.cam.ac.uk/profiles/mcs1000

Malcolm Clive Smith FREng, FIEEE is a British electrical engineer. He is a professor of control engineering at the University of Cambridge. He is notable for his contributions to feedback control and systems theory. He is also the inventor of the inerter, used in mechanical network synthesis.

Career[edit]

Smith studied at the University of Cambridge (BA 1978, MPhil 1979, PhD 1982);[1] his doctoral thesis was entitled "A Generalised Nyquist/Root-Locus Theory for Multi-Loop Feedback Systems". He worked in various research and academic posts, becoming an assistant professor at Ohio State University. In 1990, he moved to the University of Cambridge where he became a professor of control engineering and a fellow of Gonville and Caius College.[1]

Smith's research has dealt with both theoretical contributions to control and practical applications, particularly in the automotive and motorsport domains. A notable contribution was the development of the inerter,[1]' which removed some of the previous limitations on passive network synthesis. When awarding him a fellowship, the IEEE cited Smith's 'contributions to feedback control and systems theory'.[2]

As of early 2014, Smith is head of the Control Group within the University of Cambridge's Department of Engineering.[1]

Awards[edit]

Smith has received the following notable awards:

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d IEEE (2014). "Malcolm C. Smith (Distinguished Lecturer profile)". Retrieved January 4, 2014. 
  2. ^ a b IEEE (2014). "IEEE Fellows Directory". Retrieved January 4, 2014. 
  3. ^ Royal Academy of Engineering (2014). "List of Fellows". Retrieved January 4, 2014. 

Further reading[edit]

Official website