MaliVai Washington

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MaliVai Washington
MaliVai Washington at the 2010 US Open 01.jpg
Washington in 2010
Country  United States
Residence Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida
Born (1969-06-20) June 20, 1969 (age 45)
Glen Cove, New York
Height 5 ft 11 in (1.80 m)
Turned pro 1989
Retired 1999
Plays Right-handed (2-handed backhand)
Prize money $3,239,865
Singles
Career record 254–184
Career titles 4
Highest ranking No. 11 (October 26, 1992)
Grand Slam Singles results
Australian Open QF (1994)
French Open 4R (1993)
Wimbledon F (1996)
US Open 4R (1992)
Other tournaments
Olympic Games QF (1996)
Doubles
Career record 27–44
Career titles 0
Highest ranking No. 172 (April 20, 1992)
Grand Slam Doubles results
US Open 2R (1991)
Last updated on: August 5, 2012.

MaliVai "Mal" Washington (/mælɨˈvə/ mal-i-VEE; born June 20, 1969, in Glen Cove, New York) is a former professional tennis player from the United States. He reached the Men's Singles final at Wimbledon in 1996, won 4 titles and achieved a career-high singles ranking of World No. 11.

Family[edit]

Washington's father, William, taught himself and then his five children to play tennis. When William was the assistant dean at the State University of New York, he decided to teach underprivileged children in the area how to play tennis on the university's new courts. When the family moved to Mundy Township, Michigan, they played on the courts at General Motors headquarters, where MaliVai's parents worked, and at the Flint Tennis Club.

Washington's younger sister, Mashona, is also an accomplished professional tennis player. She was a member of the 1992 U.S. National Team.[clarification needed] His younger brother, Mashiska, received All-America honors at Michigan State University, before joining the men's professional tour. MaliVai's older sister, Michaela, also played professionally.[1]

Amateur tennis[edit]

Washington began playing tennis at the age of five after his family moved to Michigan. Growing up in Mundy Township, Michigan, MaliVai worked on his game and trained at the Indoor Genesee Valley Tennis Club and the Flint Tennis Club in nearby Flint, Michigan. As a teenager, he played on the junior circuit and competed in the USTA national junior championships, facing future world-class players like Pete Sampras, Andre Agassi, Jim Courier, and Todd Martin.

As a high school senior, at Carman - Ainsworth High School in Flint Township, Washington was coached by former ATP Tour participant Victor Amaya. For two seasons, Washington played tennis for the University of Michigan and was the top ranked college player in the United States at the end of his sophomore season.[1] He left school and turned professional in 1989.

Professional tennis[edit]

His first notable tour result came in 1990, when he defeated Ivan Lendl in straight sets in the second round of the tournament at New Haven, Connecticut. Just a week earlier, Lendl had lost the World no. 1 ranking to Stefan Edberg, and he would have regained it if he had won that match.

Washington won his first top-level singles title in 1992 at Memphis, Tennessee.

In 1996, Washington reached his only Grand Slam final at Wimbledon. He was the first African-American male to reach the Wimbledon final since Arthur Ashe in 1975. Washington lost to the Dutch player Richard Krajicek, 3-6, 4-6, 3-6. He also reached the quarter-finals of the Australian Open in 1994.

During his career, Washington won 4 tour singles titles. His career-high singles ranking was no. 11 in 1992.

The later years of Washington's career were plagued by injuries, and he retired from the professional tour in 1999. Since retiring, he has served as a TV analyst with ESPN, and as an on-court interviewer for the USTA during the US Open.

Accolades[edit]

MaliVai received the 1997 Boys and Girls Clubs of America CARE Award. In 1998, he was honored with the Arthur Ashe Athletic Association Leadership Award. Washington also played on the US Davis Cup team in 1992.

He was awarded the Arthur Ashe Humanitarian Of The Year Award in the 2009 ATP World Tour Awards.

Grand Slam singles final[edit]

Runner-up (1)[edit]

Outcome Year Championship Surface Opponent in Final Score in Final
Runner-up 1996 Wimbledon Grass Netherlands Richard Krajicek 3–6, 4–6, 3–6

ATP Tour finals (14)[edit]

Singles champion (4)[edit]

Legend
Grand Slam (0)
Tennis Masters Cup (0)
ATP Masters Series (0)
ATP Championship Series (1)
ATP Tour (3)
Outcome No. Date Championship Surface Opponent in the final Score in the final
Runner-up 1. January 6, 1992 Auckland, New Zealand Hard Peru Jaime Yzaga 6–7(6–8), 4–6
Winner 1. February 10, 1992 Memphis, U.S. Hard (i) South Africa Wayne Ferreira 6–3, 6–2
Runner-up 2. April 13, 1992 Tampa, U.S. Clay Peru Jaime Yzaga 6–3, 4–6, 1–6
Winner 2. May 4, 1992 Charlotte, U.S. Clay Switzerland Claudio Mezzadri 6–3, 6–3
Runner-up 3. June 15, 1992 Manchester, U.K. Grass Netherlands Jacco Eltingh 3–6, 4–6
Runner-up 4. August 17, 1992 New Haven, U.S. Hard Sweden Stefan Edberg 6–7(4–7), 1–6
Runner-up 5. January 11, 1993 Auckland, New Zealand Hard Russia Alexander Volkov 6–7(2–7), 4–6
Runner-up 6. March 12, 1993 Miami, U.S. Hard United States Pete Sampras 3–6, 2–6
Winner 3. October 10, 1994 Ostrava, Czech Republic Carpet (i) France Arnaud Boetsch 4–6, 6–3, 6–3
Runner-up 7. October 9, 1995 Ostrava, Czech Republic Carpet (i) South Africa Wayne Ferreira 6–3, 4–6, 3–6
Runner-up 8. October 23, 1995 Essen, Germany Carpet (i) Austria Thomas Muster 6–7(6–8), 6–2, 3–6, 4–6
Winner 4. April 15, 1996 Bermuda Clay Uruguay Marcelo Filippini 6–7(6–8), 6–4, 7–5
Runner-up 9. July 7, 1996 Wimbledon, London Grass Netherlands Richard Krajicek 3–6, 4–6, 3–6

Doubles finalist (1)[edit]

Performance Timeline[edit]

Singles

Tournament 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Career SR Career Win-Loss
Grand Slam Tournaments
Australian Open A A A 1R 3R 4R QF 1R 4R 4R 2R A 0 / 8 16–7
French Open A A 1R 1R 2R 4R 1R 2R 1R A A A 0 / 7 5–7
Wimbledon A A 2R 2R 1R 2R 1R 1R F A A A 0 / 7 9–7
U.S. Open A 2R 2R 3R 4R 3R 2R 1R 2R A 1R A 0 / 9 11–9
Grand Slam SR 0 / 0 0 / 1 0 / 3 0 / 4 0 / 4 0 / 4 0 / 4 0 / 4 0 / 4 0 / 1 0 / 2 0 / 0 0 / 31 N/A
Annual Win-Loss 0–0 1–1 2–3 3–4 6–4 9–4 5–4 1–4 10–4 3–1 1–1 0–0 N/A 41–30
ATP Masters Series
Indian Wells A A A A 3R 3R 1R 1R A A 2R A 0 / 5 5–5
Miami A A A 1R 2R F 2R 4R 3R A 2R A 0 / 7 10–7
Monte Carlo A A A A A A A A A A A A 0 / 0 0–0
Rome A A A A A 1R A 3R 2R A A A 0 / 3 3–3
Hamburg A A A A A A A 2R 2R A A A 0 / 2 2–2
Montreal/Toronto A A 1R 2R SF 2R QF QF 3R A 3R A 0 / 8 13–8
Cincinnati A A A 3R 1R 2R 3R 1R 2R A A 1R 0 / 7 6–6
Stockholm/Essen/Stuttgart A A A A 2R SF 1R F 2R A A A 0 / 5 9–5
Paris A A A 2R 2R 2R A 2R 3R A A A 0 / 5 4–5
Masters Series SR 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 1 0 / 4 0 / 5 0 / 7 0 / 5 0 / 8 0 / 8 0 / 0 0 / 3 0 / 1 0 / 42 N/A
Annual Win-Loss 0–0 0–0 0–1 4–4 3–5 13–7 7–5 15–8 6–7 0–0 4–3 0–1 N/A 52–41
Year End Ranking 329 199 93 50 13 23 30 26 20 258 178 1115 N/A

References[edit]

External links[edit]