Malin, Oregon

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Malin, Oregon
City
Malin city sign on Klamath Falls-Malin Highway.
Malin city sign on Klamath Falls-Malin Highway.
Location in Oregon
Location in Oregon
Coordinates: 42°0′46″N 121°24′31″W / 42.01278°N 121.40861°W / 42.01278; -121.40861Coordinates: 42°0′46″N 121°24′31″W / 42.01278°N 121.40861°W / 42.01278; -121.40861
Country United States
State Oregon
County Klamath
Incorporated 1922
Government
 • Mayor Gary Zieg[1]
Area[2]
 • Total 0.50 sq mi (1.29 km2)
 • Land 0.50 sq mi (1.29 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation 4,062 ft (1,238 m)
Population (2010)[3]
 • Total 805
 • Estimate (2012[4]) 794
 • Density 1,610.0/sq mi (621.6/km2)
Time zone Pacific (UTC-8)
 • Summer (DST) Pacific (UTC-7)
ZIP code 97632
Area code(s) 458 and 541
FIPS code 41-45400[3]
GNIS feature ID 1136509[5]

Malin is a city in Klamath County, Oregon, United States. The population was 805 at the 2010 census.

History[edit]

According to Lewis A. McArthur, Malin was settled September 30, 1909, on land that was formerly at the bottom of Tule Lake by 65 Bohemian families who named the new town for their former home. McArthur also alludes to the discovery of fossils near Malin in 1925.[6] Many surviving descendants of these original Czech families still call Malin home and maintain family farms.

Geography[edit]

Malin is at an elevation of 4,062 feet (1,238 m)[5] in southern Klamath County near the Oregon–California border.[7] It is along a spur of Oregon Route 39, southeast of Klamath Falls, east of Merrill, and northeast of Tulelake.[7] Lava Beds National Monument is to the south, nearby in California.[7] By highway, the city is 30 miles (48 km) from Klamath Falls and 309 miles (497 km) from Portland.[8]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.50 square miles (1.29 km2), all of it land.[2]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1920 110
1930 215 95.5%
1940 535 148.8%
1950 592 10.7%
1960 568 −4.1%
1970 486 −14.4%
1980 539 10.9%
1990 725 34.5%
2000 638 −12.0%
2010 805 26.2%
source:[3][9]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census of 2010, there were 805 people, 255 households, and 194 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,610.0 inhabitants per square mile (621.6 /km2). There were 278 housing units at an average density of 556.0 per square mile (214.7 /km2). The racial makeup of the city was 70.6% White, 1.1% Native American, 25.7% from other races, and 2.6% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 57.8% of the population.[3]

There were 255 households of which 49.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.6% were married couples living together, 11.8% had a female householder with no husband present, 6.7% had a male householder with no wife present, and 23.9% were non-families. 19.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.16 and the average family size was 3.66.[3]

The median age in the city was 29.1 years. 33.3% of residents were under the age of 18; 12.3% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 24.6% were from 25 to 44; 19.1% were from 45 to 64; and 10.7% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 52.5% male and 47.5% female.[3]

2000 census[edit]

As of the census of 2000, there were 638 people, 200 households, and 155 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,810.4 people per square mile (703.8/km2). There were 217 housing units at an average density of 615.8 per square mile (239.4/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 63.32% White, 0.63% African American, 2.19% Native American, 0.63% Pacific Islander, 31.03% from other races. About 2% were of two or more races. About 54% were Hispanic or Latino of any race.[3]

There were 200 households out of which 48.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.5% were married couples living together, 10.5% had a female householder with no husband present, 22.5% were non-families. Twenty percent of all households were made up of individuals. About 10% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older.[3]

The average household size was 3.19 and the average family size was 3.61. The age distribution was 36.4% under the age of 18, 9.9% from 18 to 24, 27.4% from 25 to 44, 16.5% from 45 to 64, and 9.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 28 years. For every 100 females there were 109.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 106.1 males.[3]

The median income for a household in the city was $29,750, and the median income for a family was $30,000. Males had a median income of $26,875 versus $21,591 for females. The per capita income for the city was $10,258. About 19.4% of families and 26.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 38.1% of those under age 18 and none of those age 65 or over.[3]

Economy and infrastructure[edit]

Malin city park on the northwest corner of town

As of 2002, the three largest employers in Malin were the Circle C (potato shed), Baley Troutman (farm), and Cy's Market (grocery store).[8]

The "Malin Substation", an electrical substation owned by PG&E, PacifiCorp, and BPA, forms the northern end of Path 66, a major north-south power transmission corridor. Near Malin is the Malin interconnect, where the Tuscarora, Gas Transmission Northwest and Pacific Gas & Electric gas pipelines currently connect, as will the Ruby Pipeline currently under construction.

Transportation[edit]

Climate[edit]

This region experiences warm (but not hot) and dry summers, with no average monthly temperatures above 71.6 °F. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Malin has a warm-summer Mediterranean climate, abbreviated "Csb" on climate maps.[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Incorporated Cities: Malin". Oregon Blue Book. Oregon Secretary of State. 2013. Retrieved August 24, 2013. 
  2. ^ a b "U.S. Gazetteer: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 22, 2013. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "American FactFinder". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved August 22, 2013. 
  4. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 2, 2013. 
  5. ^ a b "Malin". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. November 28, 1980. Retrieved August 24, 2013. 
  6. ^ McArthur, Lewis A. (1982). Oregon Geographic Names (5th ed.). Portland: Western Imprints. p. 468. 
  7. ^ a b c The 2013 Road Atlas. Chicago, Illinois: Rand McNally. pp. 84, 85. ISBN 978-052-80062-2-7. 
  8. ^ a b "Malin Community Profile". Infrastructure Finance Authority. 2009. Retrieved August 24, 2013. 
  9. ^ Moffatt, Riley Moore (1996). Population History of Western U.S. Cities and Towns, 1850–1990. Lanham, Maryland: Scarecrow Press. p. 212. ISBN 978-0-8108-3033-2. 
  10. ^ Climate Summary for Malin, Oregon

External links[edit]