Malino Conference

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The Dutch organised a conference in the Sulawesi town of Malino in July 1946 as part of their attempt to arrange a federal solution for Indonesia. From the end of World War II, Indonesian Republicans had been trying to secure Indonesian Independence from the Dutch colonial control.

COLLECTIE TROPENMUSEUM De conferentie met 39 vertegenwoordigers van Borneo en de Grote Oost en Nederland onder leiding van Van Mook voor de vorming van een federaal Indonesië in Malino op Celebes TMnr 10000220.jpg

The Dutch invited thirty-nine Indonesian representatives of the local rulers (rajas), Christians, and several other ethnic groups of Kalimantan and East Indonesia who supported the idea of some form of continuing Dutch connection. However, the Dutch had not anticipated the level of support amongst the Indonesians for genuine autonomy. The conference resulted in plans for a state in Kalimantan and another for East Indonesia.

References[edit]

  • Ricklefs, M.C. (1993). A History of Modern Indonesia Since c. 1300. San Francisco: Stanford University Press. p. 224.