Mallaig railway station

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Mallaig National Rail
Scottish Gaelic: Malaig
Mallaig
Location
Place Mallaig
Local authority Highland
Coordinates 57°00′20″N 5°49′49″W / 57.0056°N 5.8302°W / 57.0056; -5.8302Coordinates: 57°00′20″N 5°49′49″W / 57.0056°N 5.8302°W / 57.0056; -5.8302
Grid reference NM675970
Operations
Station code MLG
Managed by First ScotRail
Number of platforms 2
Live arrivals/departures and station information
from National Rail Enquiries
Annual rail passenger usage*
2002/03   64,300
2004/05 Increase 69,779
2005/06 Decrease 66,193
2006/07 Increase 67,393
2007/08 Decrease 62,984
2008/09 Increase 65,436
2009/10 Increase 87,862
2010/11 Decrease 85,630
2011/12 Decrease 85,378
2012/13 Decrease 82,914
History
Original company Mallaig Extension Railway of West Highland Railway
Pre-grouping North British Railway
Post-grouping LNER
1 April 1901 Station opened[1]
National RailUK railway stations
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
* Annual estimated passenger usage based on sales of tickets in stated financial year(s) which end or originate at Mallaig from Office of Rail Regulation statistics. Methodology may vary year on year.
Portal icon UK Railways portal

Mallaig railway station is a railway station serving the ferry port of Mallaig, Lochaber, in the Highland region of Scotland. This station is a terminus on the West Highland Line, 41 miles (66 km) from Fort William and 164 miles (264 km) north of Glasgow Queen Street railway station.

History[edit]

The station in 1973

Mallaig station opened on 1 April 1901.[1]

The station was laid out as an island platform with tracks on either side. There were sidings on both sides, and a turntable to the south of the station, on the west side of the line, right beside the sea.

Until 1968 two tracks continued down onto the pier, which was built and originally owned by the West Highland Railway Company. The tracks were removed when the harbour passed from British Railways ownership to that of the Mallaig Harbour Authority.

The glass overall roof was removed in 1975 and the ticket office was extended at the same time.

Services[edit]

A train to Glasgow
The Jacobite at Mallaig Station
The Skye ferry at Mallaig harbour

Scheduled train services on the ScotRail network out of Mallaig railway station are operated by First ScotRail. Currently, four trains a day depart Monday to Saturdays from Mallaig for Fort William, three of which continue to Glasgow. On Sundays during the summer four trains depart Mallaig for Fort William and Glasgow, but during winter months this is reduced to only one train. The railway line from Mallaig is noted as a scenic route, especially as it passes along the Glenfinnan Viaduct 37 kilometres (23 mi) out of Mallaig.[2][3]

Mallaig is also the destination of a special tourist steam train operated by the West Coast Railway Company, The Jacobite, which runs sightseeing trips from Fort William to Mallaig from May to October. The service runs twice daily, Monday to Friday with additional weekend services during the summer months. The Jacobite steam train is known for its association with the Harry Potter film series, particularly due to its route along the Glenfinnan Viaduct, which featured in the Harry Potter films.[2]

Ferry services[edit]

Mallaig ferry port is located in front of the railway station, approximately 130 metres (430 ft) away.

Caledonian MacBrayne ("Cal Mac") provides ferry services from Mallaig to Armadale on the Isle of Skye, a thirty minute sailing, as well as daily services to the Small Isles of Canna, Rùm, Eigg and Muck, although the timetable, itinerary and calling points differ from day to day. A small, independent ferry service run by former lifeboatman Bruce Watt sails up Loch Nevis to the remote village of Inverie in Knoydart, and also calls by prior arrangement at Tarbet in Morar, locations that are only accessible by sea. Both Cal Mac and Bruce Watt also offer non-landing sightseeing tickets.

Preceding station National Rail National Rail Following station
Morar   First ScotRail
West Highland Line
  Terminus
Arisaig   West Coast Railway Company
The Jacobite
May–October
  Terminus
"boat icon" Ferry services
Armadale   Caledonian MacBrayne
Mallaig – Skye
  Terminus
Lochboisdale   Caledonian MacBrayne
Mallaig – South Uist
  Terminus
Rùm   Caledonian MacBrayne
Mallaig – Small Isles
  Terminus
Eigg
Muck
Inverie   Bruce Watt
Mallaig – Knoydart
  Terminus
Historical railways
Morar
Line and Station open
  North British Railway
West Highland Railway (Mallaig Extension Railway)
  Terminus

Signalling[edit]

One of the semaphore signals removed in 1982

From the time of its opening in 1901, the Mallaig Line was worked throughout by the electric token system. Mallaig signal box was situated south of the station, on the east side of the line.

On 14 March 1982, the method of working on the section between Arisaig and Mallaig was changed to One Train Working (with train staff). Mallaig signal box was closed as a token station, but retained as a ground frame with four levers. All the semaphore signals were removed.

On 6 December 1987 the Radio Electronic Token Block (RETB) system was commissioned between Mallaig Junction (now called 'Fort William Junction') and Mallaig. The RETB is controlled from a Signalling Centre at Banavie railway station.

In November 1992, the former signal box was demolished and replaced by an ordinary ground frame.

The Train Protection & Warning System was installed in 2003.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Butt (1995)
  2. ^ a b Townsend, Chris (2011). Scotland. Milnthorpe: Cicerone. p. 317. ISBN 9781849653534. 
  3. ^ "Highland train line best in world". BBC News. 6 February 2009. Retrieved 14 August 2014. 

Sources[edit]

External links[edit]