Mallow (UK Parliament constituency)

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Mallow
Former Borough constituency
for the House of Commons
18011885
Number of members One
Replaced by North East Cork

Mallow was a United Kingdom Parliament constituency, in Ireland, returning one MP. It was an original constituency represented in Parliament when the Union of Great Britain and Ireland took effect on 1 January 1801.

Boundaries[edit]

This constituency was the Parliamentary borough of Mallow in County Cork.

The boundaries of the Cities and Boroughs in Ireland were defined by an Act passed in 1832, whose long title was "An Act to settle and describe the Limits of Cities, Towns, and Boroughs in Ireland, in so far as respects the Election of Members to serve in Parliament." This legislation was subsequently given the short title of the Parliamentary Boundaries (Ireland) Act 1832.

The boundaries of this constituency were described as follows.

From the Easternmost Gate Post (opposite the Park Wall of Mr. Purcell) of a Field on the Kanturk Road, the Entrance to which is distant about One hundred and seventy-six Yards (measured along the Kanturk Road) from the Seneschal's House, in a straight Line to the Gate Post nearest the Turnpike in a Wall on the Southern Side of the old Road which runs a little to the North of the Limerick Road, and which Post is distant about Two hundred and forty-two Yards (measured along the said old Road) to the North-west of the Turnpike; thence in a straight Line to the Point at which a Bye Lane joins the Fair-lane Road, about One hundred and fifty Yards to the North of the Entrance to the Lime and Salt Works; thence in a straight Line to the Point at which the Carrigoon Road, which passes under Mr. Jephson's Park Wall, is met by a Fence which divides a Field occupied by Mr. Lynch from a Field occupied by Mr. Carmichael, and which Point is also about Three hundred and seventy-five Yards to the North of a small Door in the Park Wall; thence in a straight Line across the Park to the Westernmost Point at which the Boundary of Mr. Delacour's Pleasure Grounds meets the Fermoy Road; thence, Westward, along the Boundary of Mr. Delacor's Pleasure Grounds to the Southernmost Point at which the same meets the Boundary of the Garden attached to the Water Mill; thence in a straight Line to a Point in the old Cork Road which is distant Two hundred and twenty-five Yards (measured along the old Cork Road) to the South of the old Turnpike thereon; thence in a straight Line to a Point on the new Cork Road which is distant about Two hundred and ninety Yards (measured along the new Cork Road) to the South of the said old Turnpike, and which Point is at the Commencement of a Nursery Ground; thence in a straight Line in the Direction of the Eastern Corner of Captain Davis's House to the Point at which such straight Line cuts the Blackwater River; thence in a straight Line to the Gate Post first described.

Members of Parliament[edit]

Election Member[1] Party Note
1801, 1 January John Longfield 1801: Co-opted
1802, 13 July Denham Jephson Whig
1812, 16 October Sir James Cotter, Bt
1818, 27 June William Wrixon Becher Whig
1826, 16 June Denham Jephson Whig First term
1832, 16 June William Joseph O'Neill Daunt Repeal Association Unseated on petition
1833, 24 April Denham Jephson Whig Declared elected. Second term (new surname 1838).
1859, 6 May Robert Longfield Conservative
1865, 13 July Rt Hon. Edward Sullivan Liberal Appointed Master of the Rolls in Ireland
1870, 3 February Henry Munster Liberal Unseated on petition and new writ issued
1870, 10 May George Waters Liberal Appointed chairman, County Waterford Quarter Sessions
1872, 7 June William Felix Munster Liberal
1874, 4 February John George MacCarthy Home Rule League
1880, 2 April Rt Hon. William Moore Johnson Liberal Appointed a Judge of the High Court in Ireland
1883, 24 January William O'Brien Home Rule League Last MP for the constituency
1885 Constituency abolished

Elections[edit]

  • 3 February 1870. The constituency consisted of 208 voters and Munster polled 91 votes defeating, by a majority of 8, the Conservative Major Knox. Knox stated his intention to petition the return on the basis of bribery and intimidation of the electorate.[2]

References[edit]

  • The Parliaments of England by Henry Stooks Smith (1st edition published in three volumes 1844–50), 2nd edition edited (in one volume) by F.W.S. Craig (Political Reference Publications 1973)
  • Parliamentary Election Results in Ireland, 1801–1922, edited by B.M. Walker (Royal Irish Academy 1978)