Maluca Mala

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Maluca Mala
Birth name Natalie Ann Yepez[1]
Origin Washington Heights, Manhattan[1]
Genres Electro, experimental tropical punk, ghettotech, hip house[1]
Labels RPM MSC, Mad Decent
Associated acts Diplo, Gilbere Forte, Dillon Francis
Website www.malucamala.com

Natalie Ann Yepez,[1] better known by her stage name Maluca, grew up in Washington Heights, Manhattan.[1] Raised on a steady diet of bachata, cumbia, merengue, and mambo, as well as hip-hop and other club music,[1] Maluca's music has been described as "experimental tropical punk, ghetto tech, and hip-house".[1] Although a bad case of stage fright kept her out of the spotlight for much of her life, a chance meeting with Diplo while performing karaoke eventually led to "El Tigeraso", Maluca's first single.[2]

The years 2009 and 2010 saw her touring, performing, and releasing what she calls "tropical punk" tracks.[3] Since the release of her single in 2009, Maluca has recorded tracks that range from merengue mashups to kuduro to old-school deep house and focused on her stage show, which includes two dancers named the Cookies.[4] China Food is her latest release as she prepares for a second visit to South by South West.

The name Maluca in Spanish is a derivative of Mala which means bad or mean girl. In Portuguese Maluca means a crazy or mischievous girl.[5]

Discography[edit]

Singles[edit]

Year Single Peak positions Album
US Latin Rhythm
Aug. 2009 "El Tigeraso" 11 FIFA 11 & Tuenti Movil Advert (soundtrack)
Aug. 2010 "Hector" China Food mixtape

Featured singles[edit]

Year Single Peak positions Album
US Latin Rhythm
2011 "La Campana" (Tittsworth and Alvin Risk featuring Maluca) - FIFA 12 (soundtrack)
Two Strokes Raw
2011 "Que Que" (Dillon Francis and Diplo featuring Maluca) - Que Que Remixes

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "Maluca". AllMusic. Retrieved 1 August 2013. 
  2. ^ "Artist to Watch: Maluca". XLR8R. 
  3. ^ "Interview SXSW 2010: Maluca". Spinner. 
  4. ^ "A New York Thing". VMagazine. 
  5. ^ "Let's Talk Maluca". Mun2. 

http://tmagazine.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/02/26/maluca-mala-la-crazy-bad/?ref=t-magazine

External links[edit]