Malva neglecta

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Malva neglecta
Malva neglecta-flower.jpg
common mallow
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Rosids
Order: Malvales
Family: Malvaceae
Genus: Malva
Species: M. neglecta
Binomial name
Malva neglecta
Wallr.[1]
Synonyms

Malva rotundifolia auct. non L.

Malva neglecta is also known as Common mallow in the United States and also buttonweed, cheeseplant, cheeseweed, dwarf mallow and roundleaf mallow.[2] Although often considered a weed, this plant is often consumed as a food.[3][4][5] This is especially true of the seeds, which contain 21% protein and 15.2% fat.[6] The plant is an invasive in the United States. [7]

Distribution[edit]

Native
Palearctic:
Macaronesia: Canary Islands
Northern Africa: Algeria, Morocco
Arabian Peninsula: Saudi Arabia
Western Asia: Afghanistan, Cyprus, Sinai, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Occupied Palestinian Territories, Syria, Turkey
Caucasus: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia
Soviet Middle Asia: Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan
Mongolia: Mongolia
China: Xinjiang
Indian Subcontinent: India, Pakistan
Northern Europe: Denmark, Ireland, Norway, Sweden, United Kingdom
Middle Europe: Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Germany, Hungary, Netherlands, Poland, Slovakia, Switzerland
Southeastern Europe: Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Greece, Italy, Macedonia, Montenegro, Sardinia, Serbia, Slovenia, Romania,
Southwestern Europe: France, Portugal, Spain

Source: [1]

Uses[edit]

Malva neglecta herb has been used in the traditional Austrian medicine internally as tea or externally as baths for treatment of disorders of the skin, gastrointestinal tract and respiratory tract.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN) (1995-05-23). "Taxon: Malva neglecta Wallr.". Taxonomy for Plants. USDA, ARS, National Genetic Resources Program, National Germplasm Resources Laboratory, Beltsville, Maryland. Retrieved 2008-05-09. [dead link]
  2. ^ "Malva neglecta". Integrated Taxonomic Information System. Retrieved 9 May 2008. 
  3. ^ Facciola S. Cornucopia – A Source Book of Edible Plants. Vista, Ca. Kampong Publications, 1990. 677 p.
  4. ^ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bdGAUejE8BM&feature=channel_page
  5. ^ http://www.pfaf.org/database/plants.php?Malva+neglecta
  6. ^ Duke JA. CRC Handbook of Proximate Analysis Tables of Higher Plants. Boca Raton, Fl. CRC Press, 1986. 389 p.
  7. ^ Peterson, Roger Tory, and Margaret McKenny, A Field Guide to Wildflowers of Northeastern and North Central North America. 1968, p.32
  8. ^ Vogl S, Picker P, Mihaly-Bison J, Fakhrudin N, Atanasov AG, Heiss EH, Wawrosch C, Reznicek G, Dirsch VM, Saukel J, Kopp B. Ethnopharmacological in vitro studies on Austria's folk medicine - An unexplored lore in vitro anti-inflammatory activities of 71 Austrian traditional herbal drugs. J Ethnopharmacol.2013 Jun13. doi:pii: S0378-8741(13)00410-8. 10.1016/j.jep.2013.06.007. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 23770053. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23770053

External links[edit]

Media related to Malva neglecta at Wikimedia Commons Data related to Malva neglecta at Wikispecies