Man's Rights in the Family Party

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The Man's Rights in the Family Party (Hebrew: מפלגת זכויות הגבר במשפחה - רע"ש‎, Miflega Zkhuyot HaGever BeMishpaha - Ra'ash) is a minor political party in Israel. It is currently headed by Yaakov Schlusser.

Background[edit]

The party was founded in 1996 as Justice for All (Hebrew: צדק לכל‎, Tzedek LaKol), and campaigned on two distinct issues: Men's rights and for the establishment of a commission to determine who really killed Yitzhak Rabin. According to Yaakov Schlusser its aims are to transfer primary custody to fathers and end equality for women which he believes to be "unnatural" and a cause of homosexuality amongst men.[1][2] In 2003 the party were accused of inciting violence against women and misrepresenting facts in their campaign broadcasts.[3]

In the 1999 Knesset elections it won just 1,257 votes (0.04%), the second lowest number of votes after Moreshet Avot and well below the 1.5% electoral threshold. Although the party's performance in the 2006 elections was better, winning 3,819 votes, it still amounted to just 0.12% of the vote, even further below the new threshold of 2%.

In the 2009 elections they again failed to pass the threshold and did not win any seats.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Edelson, Daniel (December 11, 2008). "Men's Rights Party vies for votes". Ynetnews. Retrieved November 3, 2012. 
  2. ^ Socol, Max (March 11, 2009). "Smaller parties reckon with the political wilderness". The Jerusalem Post. Retrieved November 3, 2012. 
  3. ^ Alon, Gideon (January 15, 2003). "Cheshin rejects petition to censor Man's Rights in the Family ad". Haaretz. Retrieved November 3, 2012. 

External links[edit]