The Man on the Train

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This article is about the 2002 film. For the 2011 film, see Man on the Train (2011 film).
The Man on the Train
Man on the train.jpg
United States theatrical poster
Directed by Patrice Leconte
Produced by Philippe Carcassonne
Written by Claude Klotz
Starring Jean Rochefort,
Johnny Hallyday,
Edith Scob
Distributed by Paramount Classics (USA)
Release dates
  • 2 September 2002 (2002-09-02) (Venice)
  • 9 October 2002 (2002-10-09) (France)
Running time 90 minutes
Country France
Language French
Budget €5 million
Box office $7,585,989

The Man on the Train (French: L'homme du train) is a 2002 French crime-drama film directed by Patrice Leconte, starring Jean Rochefort and Johnny Hallyday. It wa re-titled Man on the Train in the USA.

The movie was shot in Annonay, France and won the audience awards at the Venice Film Festival for "Best Film" and "Best Actor" (Jean Rochefort) in 2002.

Though not an English-language film, the UK Film Council awarded £500,000 (€750,000) to assist its production.[1]

Paramount Classics acquired the United States distribution rights of this film and gave it a limited US theatrical release on May 9, 2003 to a total of 85 theaters; this film went on grossing $2,542,020 in the United States theaters,[2] which is a solid result for a non-English film.[3] Paramount Classics was ecstatic with this film's performance in the United States market.[4]

Plot[edit]

Milan (Hallyday) arrives in a small town by train at the start of the week. The hotel is closed, but he finds accommodation via a chance meeting with a retired French teacher, Manesquier (Rochefort). The film tells the story of the developing relationship between these apparent opposites, though looming in the background are two unavoidable events that each is expecting to take place on the Saturday - Manesquier is to undergo a major operation, and Milan (though he keeps this secret at first) is to lead a bank robbery. Manesquier soon realises Milan's intentions, but this does not prevent a growing mutual respect, with each envying the other's lifestyle.

English-language remake[edit]

In 2011 an English-language remake of this film was released, starring Donald Sutherland as the professor and Larry Mullen, Jr. as the thief.

References[edit]

External links[edit]